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Mandarin

    24 responses

Grant starts with ...
Anyone with advice on good variety of mandarin? Want few or no seeds, and will get sun from 9am till 2pm
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Grant
Lennox Head
5th September 2015 9:24pm
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Bangkok says...
I don't know the variety but there are very good ones around, we buy them in Holland, from Spain i guess.

They are big, seedless, loose in their skin, very sweet, great flavour, very easy to peel.

Maybe the spanish grower knows the variety?
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Bangkok
thailand
6th September 2015 2:01am
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MIke T1 says...
It is all about your location and selecting the most suited variety.The show phenotypic plasticity so each type appears a bit in each location where it is grown.
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MIke T1
cairns
6th September 2015 7:36am
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jakfruit etiquette says...
The classic Aussie var is Imperial. It is both sweet, and slightly acid. Many other vars dont have the acid, which can make them over sweet to some tastes. Your coastal location means you dont have the heat as per the inland growing areas to get the same ripening for all vars.
Other good ones are Clementines, Murcotts and Satsumas.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
6th September 2015 11:15am
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Original Post was last edited: 6th September 2015 11:14am
sternus1 says...
imperial is a good one, for sure. Other than I'd have to say hickson is a goody too. I don't find a single redeeming quality in Honey Murcott.
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sternus1
Australia
6th September 2015 5:07pm
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Julie says...
Imperial definitely the best tasting of the older varieties. People here have raved over newer ones like Daisy and Arfura (?) but as I haven't tried them I can't comment.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
6th September 2015 7:14pm
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Original Post was last edited: 6th September 2015 7:14pm
Waterfall says...
I've been buying the Afourer variety in the supermarket lately, they are absolutely delicious.

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Waterfall
WATERFALL,2233,NSW
11th September 2015 10:48pm
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Bangkok says...
I found some info:

Queen is a new variety which is very good, easy to peel and seedless. It's in Spain

Or-clementines fetch the highest price and are the best. Spain and Israel.

Nadercott is also very good, from Maroc.

http://www.agf.nl/artikel/93160/Kwaliteit-en-prijsverschillen-Spaanse-mandarijnen-groot



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Bangkok
thailand
11th September 2015 11:13pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th September 2015 11:13pm
Brain says...
I second imperial! It remains my favourite.

There are plenty of mandarins varieties around and i think, with the exceptions of the new types, i.e. Sumo, you can get trees for them and its a matter of patience and then enjoy.

I tried a taylor lee mandarin of late, not bad. Too bad the seeds didnt germinate.
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Brain
Brisbane
13th September 2015 1:07pm
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Manfred says...
Seediness is fundamental in young citruses. If you grow it from a seed it will have seedy fruit for the first few years of fruiting. If it is a scion graft from an old tree, it will have few or even no seeds.

Don't choose or reject any mandarine because you have had seedy or seedless fruit of a particular type.

I'd agree on imperial.
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Manfred
tully
13th September 2015 5:20pm
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Bangkok says...
Manfred i had a grafted pomelo and a navel orange, both grafted.

The first fruits had loads of big seeds, later they had only tiny ones.

Maybe it's different for mandarins, they won't grow in my climate.
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Bangkok
thailand
13th September 2015 6:39pm
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Brain says...
I am surprised that mandarins wont grow in thailand. I recent saw a variety of mandarin from jamaca. So it does have a wide spread of climate ranges, its a matter of getting the right type.

Yes i agree about the seeds, choose the best favour and seeds are a lower consideration.

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Brain
Brisbane
13th September 2015 7:31pm
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Bangkok says...
Brain I live in Bangkok, they do grow in Chiang mai, very well but not the best variety's like from Spain. Very nice though, i buy their juice a lot on the streets.

Chiang mai is cooler in the mountains, BKK is always hot, day and night.
Chiang mai is 8-900 km up north.

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Bangkok
thailand
13th September 2015 8:32pm
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David says...
BK how do you cope with the persistant heat. Nights are a challenge here from December through to march.
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David
Springwood
13th September 2015 8:53pm
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Bangkok says...
David we have 3 airconditioners and 10 fans haha.

But in daytime from 11-4 it's almost impossible to do anything without aircon.

I like to have many tree's to keep the house/garden shaded but it doesn't help much. Wake up early, sleep early and hold a siesta works the best. And drink loads of water.
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Bangkok
thailand
13th September 2015 9:12pm
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Grant says...
Thanks for all the input, Imperial it is then. Next weekend it will go in the ground, curiously the Daleys online shop showed none in stock but on the weekend i found quite a few there. Must be hard to keep up i guess, also found an advanced Achacha that i couldn't leave behind.
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Grant
Lennox Head
14th September 2015 8:26am
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Brain says...
welcome to the club ... I would rate mandarin as a harder citrus to grow, so you will have to baby the tree to get all the nutrition right, to get sweet tasting fruit. :)

I'm also curious as to which Spanish varieties mandarin is that good? I know they do a bit of clementine and tangerines around the Mediterranean. But they haven't really taken off in Aus.
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Brain
Brisbane
14th September 2015 9:50am
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Markmelb says...
I have 2 imperials - first 3 years old on trifoliata that had first mandys this winter (several still on)that has no flavour & not juicy second a pixie on flying dragon that fruited first year - not so big fruit but juicy with good mandy flavours - not best ive had but way better than the first and should get better with size.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
14th September 2015 10:41am
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Julie says...
Mark, I have planted two mandarins in the past that were labelled Imperial, but turned out to be another variety.

It's more than annoying, as by the time you find out a few years later you can do nothing about it.

Are you sure yours is Imperial? BTW, I have one in ground and another in a bag, and they taste quite different. May have to do with nutrition, but haven't sorted that out yet.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
14th September 2015 1:15pm
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Brain says...
Mandarins are fickle and it is a challenge to grow a perfect sweet tasting mandarin, like what you expect from the shops.

My efforts with imperial, has been more of a miss. Due to insufficient watering, the internal structure was a bit tough. One year I didn't fertilise enough, and it was as sour as a lemon, thought I remedied with a bit of worm juice and it turned out all right. However, I'm getting there and I dare say I've had some success with Afourer, Okitsuwase and the Hickson.
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Brain
Brisbane
14th September 2015 6:11pm
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Markmelb says...
I gave both Imperial Pipsqueek and Trifoliate mandys exactly the same everything and the Trifoliate was rubbish in comparison - so would highly recommend any dwarf on Flying dragon - especially as a space saver for home gardens - mine are in pots - the only citrus Ive put in the ground is a Lisbon as it can be kept fairly compact too - i wish they would do a Lisbon on FG rootstock.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
14th September 2015 6:50pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th September 2015 6:49pm
Brain says...
I do have a lisbon with flying dragon rootstock and in a pot too. It took me like 3 years for it to come good and producing. Seeing you have the scion, it can be an easy exercise to purchase a few FD rootstock and graft yourself a few new plants.

Yes i would agree that daley should FD every citrus they have on catalogue!
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Brain
Brisbane
14th September 2015 7:24pm
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Boris Spasky says...
It is not correct to say the quality was rubbish due to trifoliata. This rootstock (and its dwarfing mutation FD) produces superb quality fruit.
Something is amiss with your watering and feeding regime. Is it in full sun or shaded by other plants in pots?
Fruit quality can noticeably improve after several cropping years.
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Boris Spasky

14th September 2015 8:28pm
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Markmelb says...
Thanks Brain will try and create an FD Lisbon - my budding is improving as have had successes with buds done on an espalier pear in early Feb and my old ornamental weeping cherry with cherry buds done at same time with a 50% success rate.

I think I prefer grafting over budding as the wait time is far less to see results.

But I guess if you bud citrus in late November for example you get some growth to determine a successful union before growth reduces before winter?
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
14th September 2015 8:32pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th September 2015 8:32pm
Brain says...
Not 100% sure about grafting, but i know in budding citrus, you do it in spring or autumn, when the bark slips. Maybe another user can chime in. Spring is when the saps start flowing, so i'd think you will see some results within 3 mths.

Years gone by, i brought some FD and troyer rootstock. As they were on the small planter pots and a few hot days and a slight oversight in watering has meant no more rootstock. So just be mindful of that.

Even within the rootstocks, there are some variations, so dont expect a uniform growth rate. thats my guess with your other imperial. But i agree with boris, with lots of tlc, it should come good when the plant reached an optimal size, it might just take longer thats all. Lol.
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Brain
Brisbane
15th September 2015 1:45am
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