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Pomegranate

    66 responses

Georgia starts with ...
I live in Brisbane and have three pomegranate trees. One has double flowers and hasn't yet fruited - it it true that they never do? The other two are singles, and the yield is very very low - any ideas? They are in almost full sun, well drained and I prune in winter. Thanks
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Georgia
Toowong
14th April 2012 9:37am
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MaryT says...
I would say that the double was cultivated for flowers rather than fruit.
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MaryT
Sydney
14th April 2012 11:31am
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amanda says...
Also (for the non-double)...they are usually pruned at the end of dormancy (winter)
If you google:
pomegranate pruning

You will find more info like in this link:
http://www.dryclimategardening.com/Portals/0/Blog/2009/02/pomegranate-how-to-prune-landscaping.html

There is a "wild" tree down the road from us that has loads of fruit every year...it's growing in a dreadful spot and has had no rain for 6 months now.
So they don't need to be spoiled and are very tough :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
14th April 2012 11:44am
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MaryT says...
Lucky you, Amanda. Wild pomegranate sounds good to me but today I went to the market and there were gigantic red ones for a dollar each. Yum
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MaryT
Sydney
14th April 2012 6:21pm
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Mike says...
My 2 wonderfuls grow ok but don't fruit or flower.The gene pool of many of our fruits seems to be very shallow with few varieties.One of these days I'll get seeds from the tropical thai or indian types where they are so popular.
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Mike27
 
14th April 2012 6:47pm
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MaryT says...
I have three different ones after getting rid of the white double ornamental. Have only seen the odd flower but no fruit.
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MaryT
Sydney
14th April 2012 6:56pm
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VF says...
Mike, I have a pom. that was labelled "Indian" - it has only been in the ground a few months so I doubt it will fruit for a couple of years yet, but I can keep you in mind for the future if you're still interested. At the nursery they couldn't tell me much about it except that it was one of the Indian varieties, name unknown.
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VF
 
14th April 2012 9:35pm
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Mike says...
VF thanks for the thought.It could be from a cool part of India or the hot south.Hopefully I will secure seeds of one of the good tropical ones before your one fruits.
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Mike27
 
14th April 2012 9:45pm
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MaryT says...
Mike I read that they do not like humidity - hopefully there would be cultivars that do.
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MaryT
Sydney
15th April 2012 12:37pm
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Mike says...
I think it is the temps being too high that hold back the wonderfuls.The thai ones grow in hot humid places and fruit prolifically.
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Mike25
Cairns
15th April 2012 1:11pm
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MaryT says...
The Wonderfuls are supposed to do well around here so yes it's probably too hot for them in Cairns. I'm sure you will find the right cultivar for your area; if anyone can source a plant, you can :)
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MaryT
Sydney
16th April 2012 8:45am
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amanda says...
It gets hotter here than in Cairns and they fruit fine? Maybe it's a lack of "cool" that's the problem? They come from a hot part of the world too.
$1 each MaryT!! Lucky you :) The big Aust ones are $4 each here...the big Californian wonderfuls $3 (and they are lovely too)
The wild one doesn't have nice fruit at all...it might if it were looked after though...it's profilic though.
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
16th April 2012 10:45am
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Db says...
Last week I picked large sized poms from local Woolworths for $1.50 each, they had heaps of them.. yet to taste it though... I'm also growing 3 different varieties but they are very young at this stage, I hope they will fruit here..
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Db
Brisbane
16th April 2012 10:55am
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amanda says...
Mike, I wonder if it would be worth trying some of the varieties that were originally bred in Florida...? (like Wonderful)

You should be ok Db...it's possible that if u have a 'soft seeded' variety that the seeds go hard, in a warmer temp..?
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
17th April 2012 9:53am
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MaryT says...
I tried 'kneading' the pomegrante on the bench before poking a hole in it then drinking the juice - yum
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MaryT
Sydney
17th April 2012 11:02am
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Mike says...
Mary I knead dough so I should get a job in a bakery.The book came and it is fantastic.Thanks but you go too far.

Amanda,Wonderfuls might have been bred in Florida but are probably more suited for California.Mine are out of their comfort zone and will never be fruitful.That's why I'd like the ones from the humid tropics or even near equatorial zones.
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Mike28
 
17th April 2012 4:36pm
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BJ says...
I'm testing the Ben Hur ones now, so I'll let you know how they go Mike. I had a Vietnamese Pom, but it was a gnarly thing and the fruits only so-so. It liked it hot and wet though. I donated it to another gardener due to its large spines.

I mulched my 'Wonderful'. They grew okay, but didnt flower well or fruit at all compared to any others.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
17th April 2012 5:02pm
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MaryT says...
BJ what are the 'others' you speak of that flowers and fruit better than the "Wonderful"? I just bought one, woe.

Mike I can't think of a more appropriate book to send you. I ordered it online so am glad it arrived. I was going to give you my copy but it's one of those books people borrow and keep,so one of my friends has it.:)

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MaryT
Sydney
17th April 2012 5:11pm
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Mike says...
It is a beauty alright and I have flicked through it already.It is more than youb should do Mary and once again there is imbalance in the universe that needs to be corrected.
Wonderful is one of the best and oldest and certainly has been prized in California for decades.The varieties I was referring to are un-named tap tims from thailand that are grown as seedlings.They are suberbly suited to latitudes of 10 to 20 and rainfall of 1200mm to 3000mm per year.They are less red inside and out,smaller and taste very nice.
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Mike28
 
17th April 2012 5:44pm
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Db says...
BJ, I was set to put my wonderful in a ground on last weekend but rain stopped me from doing site preparation. Looks like I shouldn't put it in ground for now, anyone in Brisbane successful in getting fruits from wonderful? How abt Rosavaya? Mine went in ground just few days back, I hope it fruits here. BJ, is ur Ben Hur cutting grown or seedling? Mine seem seedling, not sure how it will fruit if it is seedling.
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Db
Brisbane
17th April 2012 5:50pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th April 2012 5:55pm
Diana says...
Lots from Rosavaya and even more from Jativa. Come to think of it, none yet from wonderful. They are all 3 years old.

Diana.
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Diana
Western Brisbane
17th April 2012 9:18pm
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Db says...
Thanks Diana, that helps. Now my wonderful will stay in pot. Jativa sounds interesting, Where did u buy ur Jativa from? It's not mentioned on Daley's.
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Db
Brisbane
17th April 2012 10:01pm
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amanda says...
Sounds like my Wonderful can stay in it's pot and come south to cooler nights too then. Must need some chill hours/more Med climate...?
As it's one of the commercial varieties in California you would expect it to be fruitful at least.
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
18th April 2012 8:54am
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MaryT says...
Phil, please don't tell me that is your tree or I'll get green eyes! That is a BEAUTIFUL crop! What a sight!
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MaryT
Sydney
18th April 2012 10:05am
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
No, and I just noticed it's copyrighted as well.. had better replace it! Chili seeds on their way MT
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
18th April 2012 10:33am
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Parr's nursery in Cobargo, near Bega, NSW has some interesting varieties from the former Soviet Union. I ordered Gulosha Azerbaijani, Jativa and Kazake but they have seven or eight others at a great, mail order price.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
18th April 2012 10:36am
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amanda says...
Phil...do the varieties from cold climates (like Russia) have some chill hours needed do you think..?
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth
19th April 2012 11:09am
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
I don't imagine so, the Old Soviet Union included countries which are now on the Turkish border, so really Middle Eastern in origin. Persia was traditionally the home of the wild pomegranate so they'd have much the same requirements as the ones we are more familiar with.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
19th April 2012 11:27am
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Jantina says...
Mike Daleys list a Vietnamese variety that might enjoy your climate more.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
19th April 2012 3:55pm
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Mike says...
Jantina, it could be from the cool inland north.I am endeavouring to get the southern thai ones so I may have them in hand before too long with luck.
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Cairns
19th April 2012 4:19pm
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amanda says...
The mighty and ancient pomegranate..."exceptionally high levels of the polyphenol anti-inflammatory and antioxidant - ellagitannin"

An anti-inflammatory!? Yay! ....I know one person who could do with a good dose of this Natural Remedy/Superfood... ;-)



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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth.
27th April 2012 11:59pm
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Julie says...
That was naughty amanda!
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Julie
Roleystone WA
28th April 2012 6:40pm
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snottiegobble says...
You must mean the State premier, Amanda??
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso
28th April 2012 10:02pm
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amanda says...
:-) Yup. Anyone know what you use Pomegranate Molasses on, for/in cooking do u think?
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth.
29th April 2012 9:18am
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Georgia says...
very good as a marinade for lamb!
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Georgia
Toowong
29th April 2012 1:59pm
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peter, says...
hi all,
how do you tell when a pomegranite
is ripe.
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peter,
adelaide
29th April 2012 2:09pm
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MaryT says...
peter, I like this answer: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_can_you_tell_if_a_pomegranate_is_ripe
though I do not agree with the juicing advice. My quick and easy way is to knead the fruit on a bench till it turns into a bag of juice then poke a hole in it and drink it, 'milking' it as you go. (Warning, it does squirt) This has therapeutic value on a par with cracking bubble wrap. Highly recommended. You can also pretend you're a vampire sucking blood - that is, if you're a kid.
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MaryT
Sydney
29th April 2012 2:29pm
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peter, says...
thanks mary, ill leave it a few more
days then try your kneading method.
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peter,
adelaide
29th April 2012 7:10pm
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Db says...
Just an update about my Rosavaya that I bought and planted in ground in April this year - it went completely deciduous but started growing as winter passed, flowered a lot and set one fruit and its growing well, very happy, I wasn't expecting it to set any fruit in this season... Question - Do I need to bag it?

I also put my wonderful in ground (i think in June or July-12), it also flowered but being very young and small it dropped all the flowers (it actually set tiny 2 fruits but they dropped), I'm sure it will set some fruits in next season...
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Db
Brisbane
19th November 2012 10:23am
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Original Post was last edited: 19th November 2012 12:48pm
BJ says...
I would bag it. My old vietnamese one got hit by fruit flies despite being one of the woodier types. Unless you really like average pomegranates I would yank the wonderful early on and put in something else. They perform poorly and taste ordinary, but are a nice softer looking ornamental type...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
19th November 2012 10:59am
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Db says...
Thanks BJ, Ok I'll bag it and also dig out my wonderful then.. I should have bought Ben Hur when it was available with Daley's just few days back... Will keep looking for it and will replace wonderful with Ben Hur or is there any other better variety? I have one Ben Hur that I bought at Rockley Brisbane market here but I'm not trusting it as there was no PBR tag on it, it just had hand-written label and also it looks like seedling but not cutting grown...
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Db
Brisbane
19th November 2012 12:32pm
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Original Post was last edited: 19th November 2012 12:35pm
Pauline says...
I bought a Bunnings generic one, I must have had it about three years and not one fruit. :(
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Pauline
Adelaide
19th November 2012 7:52pm
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snottiegobble says...
One of the nicest alcoholic drinks I have ever had was at a Brittany couples wedding in Jersey, channel isles! It was called Pernod & Grenadine & quite a potent aperitif. The pernod is made from aniseed & the grenadine a popular juice from pomegranites! That was over 40 years ago, but will never forget that wonderful taste & the resultant milky pink colour of the drink so juice your over abundance & google for some Pernod!
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snottiegobble
South of Bunbury
20th November 2012 12:21am
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Db says...
Pauline, I also had one bad experience with Bunnings fruit tree (fig), so I've decided not to buy any fruit tree from Bunnings in future even if plant look healthier. I'm buying only from Daleys, till now I've bought around 30 fruit trees from Daleys in last 9 months and around 25 have set fruit or at least tried to set fruit by flowering.
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Db
Brisbane
20th November 2012 8:47am
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BJ says...
Db, Bunnings trees are fine, as they mostly come from Birdwood, who have won the industry award for best large scale nursery. I've visited them and their setup and collection is first class. Just make sure you are getting grafted trees, or healthy plants of varieties where grafted cvs are not required, and plants suited to local conditions. Unless you are an experienced grower, an elderly Italian or Greek couple or have lucked out on the perfect fig for Brisbane, growing figs here is likely to bring more pain than pleasure. I've failed miserably in the past with army grubs and general humidity taking down my common figs. I'm going to try again soon with varieties that have been developed (or well adapted heirloom types) by older Italian growers locally that cope with the heat and humidity combo. I did the same thing with grapes and now have two super productive vines that never need spraying or any other care.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
20th November 2012 9:11am
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Db says...
Alright BJ, in that case I'll consider Bunnings in future if I cannot get any specific tree in Daleys.. My fig tree from Bunnings is actually growing very nice, only thing was it was mislabeled.. I bought it as White Adriatic and it turned out to be black Genoa or something else (that time Bunnings also had lots of big Black Geonoa plants but I specifically choose White Adriatic bcoz I wanted that variety)... Mine also gave me 2 fruits in last season but taste wasn't good - no flavour and no sweetness, hopefully taste will improve over the time.

What variety of grape you are growing? Any chance of getting cuttings?
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Db
Brisbane
20th November 2012 9:34am
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BJ says...
Db - sure, I'm going to do a few cuttings in winter. I havent matched them up to any cultivars that I know yet, but one is a short fat cluster bunch that is super sweet and tropical flavoured - almost like Jaboticaba, with red/pink skin. The other is a blue black grape on a long bunch that has a slightly tart but still very sweet flavour. I got the black one from a house where the old Italian father died and his son was going to bulldoze the vine to put in a shed so I gave him a 6pack of beer and dug it out. The other I got locally and the owner called it 'tropical grape'. Both have decent sized seeds though.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
20th November 2012 9:56am
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Db says...
Thanks BJ, I was actually looking for seedless but I would love to try your cuttings if it has good flavour, let me know once you prune yours.. Which seedless varieties you can recommend for Brisbane?
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Db
Brisbane
20th November 2012 10:04am
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BJ says...
Unfortunately I still havent found a seedless variety that performs nearly as well. I'm still looking though.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
20th November 2012 11:16am
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amanda says...
BJ - I was reading on an American pomegranate site that the seed thing has something to do with temperatures versus variety of pomegranate...
Might try and see if I can find it again...it suggested that some varieties are lower chill than others - and if u put them in a warmer climate they form the hard seed inside...
Dunno...never heard of it b4 - but it was interesting... :)
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amanda19
Leschenault (160kms south of Perth)
22nd November 2012 10:56am
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Db says...
Amanda, BJ was talking about seedless grapes above, not seedless pome
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Db
Brisbane
22nd November 2012 11:43am
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Pauline says...
BJ, birdwood certainly aren't the main supplier in sa. I have totally forgotton the 'brand' of the pomegranate I got there, they are a range. A range which I won't buy again, although I am perfectly happy with most bunnings plants.
I haven't even had a flower. :-(
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Pauline
Adelaide
22nd November 2012 6:44pm
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Grant says...
Hi gang, has anyone had a good 'Wonderful' experience? I ask this cause i bought one from Daleys about 6 weeks ago and planted straight in the ground.
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Grant
Lennox Head
22nd November 2012 7:20pm
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Db says...
Grant, mine is in ground too since last 3-4 months but BJ has recommended me to pull it out in one of his recent post above.
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Db
Brisbane
22nd November 2012 7:42pm
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allybanana says...
My wonderful is growing well but the fruit start setting late december and they dont ripen enough to get tasty before winter. I have heard wonderful likes a hot summer to have good fruit you should be hotter that here at lennox head make shure it gets lots of sun good luck .
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allybanana
 
22nd November 2012 7:43pm
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allybanana says...
The main pomergranates you by in the super market are wonderful and they taste pretty good, maybe not enough sour but sweet and flavourfull. They also are a vigourase grower from personal experience. If you live in a hot climate like brisbane i most certainly wouldnt be ripping them out.

As for soft seeded varieties they grow just fine to, reasonable drainage and a good layer of manure and mulch on top soak once a week in first couple of years and boom.
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allybanana
 
22nd November 2012 8:09pm
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amanda says...
Ah..but isn't anyone interested in the pomegrantes with the arials that don;lt have the hard seed inside..? Ok..thought it was a Pomegranate thread ;)
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amanda19
Leschenault (160kms south of Perth)
23rd November 2012 1:36am
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Db says...
Amanda, I also wish for seedless pomegranate, also seedless mango and guava :)
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Db
Brisbane
23rd November 2012 8:45am
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BJ says...
I reccommend putting the wonderful in a pot. They grow very well in pots and will fruit quite fine. I have found that where I am they just grow really well and dont put enough energy into fruiting. They are a nice ornamental though as they lack the thorns of the other types. I'm trying Ben Hur in gorund as it looks to have the same fairly thornless ornamental qualities of the wonderful, but I'm hoping it will perform better - and the fruits are supposed to be huge and tasty.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
23rd November 2012 9:23am
#UserID: 3270
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Mike says...
I have 2 wonderfuls that have been anything but.They grow fine but produce no flowers or fruit.Luckily thety are soon falling on their swords and volunteering spots to trees that will come up with the goods.
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Cairns
23rd November 2012 9:41am
#UserID: 5418
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Diana says...
My Wonderful is now producing quite well (I suppose will see what the hail damage was from last weekend when I cut them open).
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Diana
Brisbane
23rd November 2012 7:08pm
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VF says...
With any luck Diana, the hard shell has protected the arils. Bought ones seem to survive falls onto tiled floor at my place (kids!)
Db, I too got a Rosavaya from Daleys this year, and mine too is flowering its' head off - I keep plucking off the fruit that sets as plant can't be bigger than 50cm. Seems to be a precocious 'lil bugger. Next year may be better to fruit.
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VF
Wongawallan
24th November 2012 10:16am
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Db says...
VF, My Rosavaya is 140cm tall, it was probably more than 50cm when I bought it... it has set only one fruit in this season so I have not bothered to remove it, looks like it will set more fruits in next season...
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Db
Brisbane
24th November 2012 11:01am
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VF says...
I got mine mid-winter (MT size) - don't think it's put on any real height,(hard to tell as branches quite droopy), but bushing up well. Hopefully it will take off once flowering over and done with, as I'd love some fruit next year. My other varieties seem to be only intent on growing.
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VF
Wongawallan
24th November 2012 11:49am
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Neat says...
Rousting up an old thread here...looking for some advice. We have a 3 yr old (since planting) pomee tree, espaliered so it kept quite small. My problem is that the very first year we had her in the ground, she flowered, fruit set, and we had three very lovely fruit from her. Then last year all the 'fruit' dropped off once the flowering was done, and it looks as though it is happening again (just picked the first up off the ground :( ) At the moment, there's around 19 buds on the tree in various stages of growth. Has anyone any ideas on how to set the fruit? I'm in a suburb of perth btw
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Neat
Tapping
11th October 2013 7:58pm
#UserID: 8266
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Neat says...
Oh...and this is the tree and its instructions...
Pomegranite….Gulosha rosavaya
From Russia with love comes this perfect pomegranate – light pink, large sized fruit bears masses of sweet, juicy, slightly acidic seeds that are truly divine.

FEATURES: Is in fact a true berry…and a tough one at that. A deciduous tree growing to around 5m x 4m, with an attractive, somewhat shrubby habit, the pomegranate will tolerate a range of soils, from lovely and loamy to tough and clayey. Seriously, these things are so easy to grow that everyone should have a go.

FOR BEST RESULTS: Pop your pomegranate in a warm sunny spot where you can enjoy the gorgeous, glossy spring/summer foliage as it changes from red to apple green with the seasons. As long as the tree is protected from any spring frosts it should be fairly trouble-free; pomegranates are extremely cold tolerant and love a hot, dry summer. Water is important for pomegranates, so prevent from drying out over spring – it will improve growth and fruit set in the long run. Water for the rest of the year can be fairly limited – they don’t need too much, especially not in heavier clay soils. The key irrigation period is from flowering and peaking during the fruit development and at maturation-where lack of water at this time may cause fruit splitting.
Don’t be afraid to prune your pomegranates, and this is best done over winter. The idea is to clear out the middle of the tree a bit to prevent over-crowding. Remember though that pomegranates bear their fruit on mature wood, so don’t go too silly with the secateurs. Pomegranates are ready to harvest in autumn to winter, and the secret here is to grab the biggest, brightest fruits first. If picked at the right time, pomegranates can be stored successfully for a couple of months in a dark, cool place or the fridge. They do NOT continue to ripen once picked.
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Neat
Tapping
11th October 2013 7:59pm
#UserID: 8266
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amanda says...
Neat - have a read of this page on a Blog that is also specifically for WA gardeners - by a lady who works in Agriculture Dept...
It's a great resource and I also encourage other WA gardeners to use it - because much Eastern States advice just doesn't work here on the Bassendean sand plain...and with our climate...

http://wahorticulture.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/flowering-what-can-go-wrong-with-it-and-why/
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amanda19
Leschenault (150km south of Perth)
13th October 2013 11:44am
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