Testimonials Shop News Specials Catalogue Contact Forum Blog My Account My Edibles
Christmas vouchers
Christmas vouchersLast chance Fruit tree for Christmasopening over Christmas
Forum Rules | Updates

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum

Yellow Lemon Tree Leaves

    63 responses

Sort:
Andrea starts with ...
My 3 years old lemon tree is partially green leaves and partially yellow leaves, the fruits stay small and green, never turn into mature yellow lemon, what can I do? fertilizer? we have plenty of rain this winter.
About the Author
Andrea2
Melbourne
17th August 2010 3:32pm
#UserID: 4103
Posts: 1
View All Andrea2's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Hello Andrea
Sounds like your tree has a Magnesium deficiency for starters.
Apply a hand full of Magnesium Sulphate [Epsom Salts] per square metre under the tree out beyond the drip line, the same thing with Dolomite. If you mulch under the tree pull it aside first. Also add a good citrus fertiliser with trace elements or Terrafoska TE and you will see much improvement.

About the Author
Wayne
Mackay QLD
17th August 2010 4:58pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 17th August 2010 4:59pm
Violet_Cactus says...
Hi Andrea,
Do a Ph test, also try adding chelated iron.

From Gardening Australia:
Yellow leaves on a green plant can indicate a number of problems, including lime-induced chlorosis. The symptoms of this condition are yellow leaves with darker green veins. It occurs on the new growth and when it's severe it can cause the whole leaf to become pale yellow or almost white. Lime-induced chlorosis affects many types of plants and happens when iron in the soil is 'locked up' and not available to the plant.

Alkaline soil is the major source of this problem and this is caused by the application of alkaline water, mulch or compost (such as spent mushroom compost). Sometimes it can be caused by lime leeching out of the render in walls and buildings.

To correct this problem, apply iron chelates. This should be mixed with water and can be applied as a foliar spray or around the root zone. If the weather is still warm, the leaves should start to green up within a week, however it will probably take a couple more applications at the rate of one application every two to four weeks until the leaves are as green as they should be.

Treating your plants with iron chelates is only a short-term solution to the symptoms of chlorosis and it doesn't actually treat the soil. For a long-term solution, apply agricultural sulphur.

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s2829969.htm
About the Author
VioletCactus1
Melbourne
17th August 2010 7:50pm
#UserID: 516
Posts: 349
View All VioletCactus1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
You can do one or the other Andrea, but to add sulphur over dolomite is chasing your tail
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay QLD
18th August 2010 11:22am
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Andrea - can u post a picture? also the old leaves versus the new one's?
Are the new leaves getting smaller? Is it the new growth that is pale?
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. WA
18th August 2010 2:14pm
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
Amanda,
Andrea is saying the leaves are partially green and partially yellow with the fruit not maturing. To me that indicates a low PH as one of the problems.
In fact I would be also adding some Gypsum, especially if it is heavy soil.

Sulphur is going to lower the PH even further.
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay QLD
18th August 2010 3:35pm
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
I'd still like to see a pic Wayne... :) This part of growing really interests me and I enjoy the problem solving part.
It's not quite clear to me what Andrea is saying. It's pretty hard to determine the problem without a pic and a pH test.

Magnsium deficieny can also occur when potassium and calcium levels too high. Gypsum is calcium sulphate.

Fruits not maturing suggest an immobile element (like iron, calcium or boron)

Andrea could have also chucked a whole heap of super phosphate or nitrogen on her tree...the "whole" story is important.

I don't believe in just putting a remedy on my trees cos' someone tells me so...I am not saying u are wrong Wayne - but pics are important and so is the history.
Deficiencies are not simple and without a pH test, at the very least ..forget it - you are running blind. And anyone who wants to grow a fruit tree MUST learn to do a pH test, at the very least - otherwise - forget it.
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. WA
18th August 2010 5:23pm
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 19th August 2010 12:47am
amanda says...
Andrea - this is why a pH test is important. And - if u really want to garden....you will need to learn how to do one.... :)
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. WA
19th August 2010 1:04am
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Carol says...
Hey guys, I am in the same position as Andrea. I have a potted lemon tree. Leaves are going yellow and I have no drip line for the epsom salt so I put in just inside around the pot and it liked it but it didn't improve. I still have two lemons on it and they are still green. All my friends lemons are going yellow. Can I save the tree, I am not concerned about the two lemons but I would like to save them as well.

Also my roots are at the surface, are they suppose to be?
About the Author

Queensland
26th February 2011 9:17am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Pauline says...
Yellowing leaves are the sign of a lot of things, a photo would help LOADS. Is it the older leaves turning first or the new leaves? Is it the veins, or inside of the veins, or is it the whole leaf?
About the Author
Pauline
Adelaide
26th February 2011 1:53pm
#UserID: 1532
Posts: 293
View All Pauline's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Charles cant spell says...
Please dont ask these questions without pictures, we like to be helpful so we are going to respond but the chances of being wrong, even totally wrong, i.e to acidic or to basic could worsen your problem and kill the tree.

Please provide photos or take a leaf to a garden centre.

Cheers.
About the Author
Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
26th February 2011 3:25pm
#UserID: 2742
Posts: 411
View All Charlesstillcantspell1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
kert says...
Yellowing on lemon leaves is a hoary,old chestnut, beloved of Gargening Australia. It's magnesium deficiency and fixed with Epsom salts foliar spray. The packet even gives the instructions of how to do it, that's how common it is.
About the Author

sydney
26th February 2011 3:49pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Andrea, if for some reason you can't send a pic, have a look at this. It shows examples of deficiences in citrus.

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus

I take photos, but haven't put a programme on the computer to resize them - so they are too big to go through. Must do it soon!
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
26th February 2011 5:15pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 26th February 2011 5:20pm
Brad says...
It's one reason kert. Not the reason
About the Author
Brad2
G Hill,Perth
26th February 2011 11:43pm
#UserID: 2323
Posts: 762
View All Brad2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Wayne says...
I'm thinking that Carol's tree is root bound, one reason why some roots are on the surface. I think it needs to be planted out or re-potted
About the Author
Wayne
Mackay QLD
27th February 2011 8:58am
#UserID: 338
Posts: 908
View All Wayne's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Charles cant spell says...
Julie what operating system do you have. I just right click on the photo or photos and select send to then select mail Recipient - then it will ask you what size you want them to end up. Its not very techy only gives a couple of sizes, it opens up outlook or email client and attaches them in their smaller size, you can then select them, and copy and paste them into a new folder (as file names are the same as the original). That is for Windows 7 and Win XP not sure about 98 etc.

I.e. this requires no extra picture editing software, but it might require outlook to be enabled, even if you dont use it to manage emails.
About the Author
Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
27th February 2011 2:36pm
#UserID: 2742
Posts: 411
View All Charlesstillcantspell1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brad says...
as an example why pictures are so important, here's some different types of yellow citrus leaves, with different causes and cures. scanned ages ago out of some borrowed book, so I can't give the reference.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
About the Author
Brad2
G Hill,Perth
27th February 2011 3:26pm
#UserID: 2323
Posts: 762
View All Brad2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
MaryT says...
This US site has good description and photographs of yellow leaves (like yours, Brad) with explanations and solutions. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs141
About the Author
MaryT
Sydney
27th February 2011 4:18pm
#UserID: 5412
Posts: 2066
View All MaryT's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
That's a good link MaryT - thanks! Brad what is the pic 1 deficiency in that eg?

(2 is Mg and 3 is Fe?)
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA.
27th February 2011 5:44pm
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
grub says...
hi amanda picture one i lack of nitrogen i suffed from this,this year
About the Author

 
27th February 2011 7:08pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Charles, I don't have problems with sending by email, though they might take a while. I had difficulties putting pictures on this site.

Thanks for the info, I'll see if it works for me. There is a free prog. called Picasa which is supposedly very good. They store the pics for you,saving room on your hard drive.

I'm sure it's easy to install - I just hate fiddling with anything techy!
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
27th February 2011 7:50pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Charles cant spell says...
Julie, you use the email thing to make the file smaller (i.e. reduce the pic size) it needs to be smaller than 140kb ? then it can be attached. You dont use it to email people.

But picasa is ok expect it wants to take over everything, anyone would think its google or something.
About the Author
Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
27th February 2011 10:36pm
#UserID: 2742
Posts: 411
View All Charlesstillcantspell1's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Hey Julie - I do it the same way as CCS (I think he told me actually..?!) If u want to email me your phone number I can call u and talk u thru it if u like....(easier than emailing intructions - but I can try that too...)
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA.
28th February 2011 12:42am
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brad says...
Irfanview is a 1 file simple to download and use program that I recommend for viewing and editing. it also lets you do batch resizing etc

you guys got those pics correct. Nitrogen, magnesium and iron. When I've had lack of nitrogen they looked more mottled than that pic though. note that Ph is sometimes a factor in deficiencies, rather than lack of elements themselves.

here's hoping the original query poster can post some pics :)
About the Author
Brad2
G Hill,Perth
28th February 2011 1:13am
#UserID: 2323
Posts: 762
View All Brad2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
MaryT says...
Looks like we lost Andrea who posted the query but meanwhile I learnt a lot from researching for the answers so it's all good. :)
About the Author
MaryT
Sydney
28th February 2011 6:28am
#UserID: 5412
Posts: 2066
View All MaryT's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
kert says...
It's been said that commoner things are commonest;as Magnesium deficiency is practically universal treat for that before enetertaining other causes.
About the Author

sydney
28th February 2011 8:49am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Perhaps Andrea just wanted a quick, simple answer - lots of people do! Having worked in a nursery, I know many folks hate it if you give them a choice. It's usually'Just tell me one thing to do and I'll do it!
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
28th February 2011 2:57pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brad says...
fair enough Julie and Kert. I'll bet she needs nitrogen. Add some dynamic lifter. if you can get the citrus one, it'll fix any other problems too :)
About the Author
Brad2
G Hill,Perth
1st March 2011 1:19am
#UserID: 2323
Posts: 762
View All Brad2's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
Hey Brad, I didn't know there was a citrus one! Mind you, since D. Lifter was taken over by Yates it has about doubled in price. I now buy Multigrow DPM. Similiar to the old D.Lifter price.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
1st March 2011 7:58pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Helen says...
having trouble with my young lemon tree too. here is a photo:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v32/missruckus/P1010351.jpg
About the Author
Helen10
Toronto
2nd August 2011 5:58am
#UserID: 5607
Posts: 1
View All Helen10's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Helen - it might be worth checking pH of the potting mix and/or the bark stuff you have on top? (is it mulch?)

I'd be potting it up into a much bigger pot than that now also (or get it in the ground). Make sure it has good drainage and don't over water it.

It looks a bit hungry to me - if the pH is good - then try giving it some liquid feeds of a good product like Miracle Grow or such (I tend to go slightly weaker and more often in pots - to avoid salt build ups..) and some liquid seaweed is a great tonic for all plants.

Not sure what your climate is like there so can't comment on that part...
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
2nd August 2011 9:25am
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Steven says...
Citrus trees are susceptible to magnesium and iron deficencies, both will cause the leaves to yellow an iron deficency will usually leave the veins of the leaf green but the rest will turn yellow and for a Mg deficiency i think the whole leaf usually turns yellow.

You can buy Magnesium Sulphate at the supermarket as Epson salts and you can get iron either at the nursery or a hardware store as colouring for cement.

A simple layer of compost or good fertilizer may also help.


Regards

Steven
About the Author
Steven
Eastern Suburbs
2nd August 2011 5:09pm
#UserID: 704
Posts: 322
View All Steven's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
That's true Steven - but it does depend on the pH...if it's too alkaline then it's [Iron, Manganese and Zinc] that are the usual suspects. You can usually buy a Zinc/Manganese mix for this very reason - it's that common.

It can be hard to tell the difference between some of them...that's why a pH test can narrow them down.

In winter citrus will often get the "yellows" as the soil is too cold for effective uptake - particularly zinc. Foliar spraying works best in this instance.

Overwatering can cause an iron deficiency - and other ghastly yellows if it's bad enuf'

It's interesting as many of my citrus (mostly the lemons n limes) are always showing a slight deficiency (as it's very hard to amend the soil permanently) - but they still produce the most lovely fruit...

I don't get too stressed about it anymore - I find foliar spraying can cause more damage than the problem itself?! Pine bark chips, as mulch, have been my best friend in maintaining a more acid soil.

The other thing I have found is that almost every single manure or mulch that I have sourced externally, is alkaline...once it's laid out - it sorts itself out and ends up fairly neutral - but it can cause a transient deficiency in the meantime.
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
3rd August 2011 9:29am
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Xiem says...
It might be appropriate at this point to ask about the benefits of peeing on one's lemon tree. Is this just convenient for blokes or are there real advantages? Is it recommended for yellowing leaves and in what "doses"??
About the Author
Diego
 
4th August 2011 4:42pm
#UserID: 4715
Posts: 277
View All Diego's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jason says...
An old chestnut,you know. It is magnesium deficiency, fixable with Epsom salt as foliar spray. Is there any one left who hasn't heard of this?
About the Author

Katoomba
5th August 2011 10:00am
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Steven says...
I agree Amanda, If the soil is too alkaline it will hinder the trees uptake of minerals. check that then i would give it some epsom salts or iron.

haha, i might be wrong but i think the reason why people pee on lemon trees is because there is ammonia in your urine.
About the Author
Steven
Eastern Suburbs
5th August 2011 10:08am
#UserID: 704
Posts: 322
View All Steven's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
MaryT says...
Wee works. I planted a tin of lemon tree (that's how they came in the 60s) and made my brother wee on it and it thrived and fruited for years. Not sure if it's still alive; it was a long time ago and we don't live there any more. Maybe the tin provided the iron :)
About the Author
MaryT
Sydney
6th August 2011 7:53am
#UserID: 5412
Posts: 2066
View All MaryT's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Jason says...
I heard a funny story from a commercial citrus orchard, someone got the idea peeing on a lemon tree was good and it ended up some bloke and all his mates decided to use it as their official backyard pee area and killed the tree stone dead. So you want to limit you pee'ers to one or two :)
About the Author
Jason
Portland
6th August 2011 8:46am
#UserID: 637
Posts: 1217
View All Jason's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
amanda says...
Apparently wee should be diluted 1/10 b4 application - but if you peed just outside the drip zone (not too often) you might be ok...?
Perhaps it (the urea) could burn the surface feeder roots otherwise....(especially that super-concentrated morning wee! :)
About the Author
amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
6th August 2011 11:31am
#UserID: 2309
Posts: 4607
View All amanda19's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 6th August 2011 11:32am
Mike says...
The rule of 'thumb' is different spots along the dripline and never near the trunk.I think nearly all fertliser should be at the drip line or further out and let the roots go chasing the nutrients.Some asian farmers say this improves the root system and also makes trees more 'drought proof'.
About the Author

Cairns
6th August 2011 3:49pm
#UserID: 0
Posts:
View All 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Carol says...
Okay guys I have ready everyones information and arguments, you all make me laugh and smile. Brad I am not Picture 2 or 3, I would say i am closer to being picture 1. As for the root problem I am thinking of upsizing the pot but have been cautious as I know there are so many risks to upsizing too early or too much. We have now had a massive amount of rain, more than normal so I am thinking that is not helping. I am new to the gardening scene and plan to stay so I agree with one of the others that I should also learn to do a PH test. I will do the epsom salts first and organise either the magnisium or the iron issue once I do the PH test. Thank you for all arguing about my problem, you are all awesome.
Carol
About the Author
Carol22
Queensland, Australia
1st April 2012 11:14am
#UserID: 6799
Posts: 1
View All Carol22's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jill says...
Hi everyone,

Reading through the previous comments, I'm thinking that my mandarin is suffering from an iron deficiency - although it could be magnesium or manganese. Could anyone advise? As you can see in the picture, the leaves are quite yellow although more green around the veins, and the tree produces lots of flowers but no fruit.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
About the Author
jill
 
24th September 2013 2:53pm
#UserID: 7680
Posts: 4
View All jill's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
jill, I posted this a couple of years ago, so you may not have seen it (way up in the thread). Have a look.

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus

It looks more like manganese than magnesium deficiency, though they look very alike. A friend had a similar problem with an avocado recently - it was hard to tell the difference. But as she had given it Epsom salts the previous season, I guessed manganese. It worked.

About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
24th September 2013 3:02pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 24th September 2013 3:14pm
jill says...
Hi Julie,

Thanks, I did look at that website, it was very informative. I checked out the section on nutrient deficiencies but, to be honest, it's hard (at least for me) to tell the difference between some of the conditions that cause yellowing leaves. Both these seem applicable, as do the photos:
* "Iron: Young leaves chlorotic, stunted abnormal growth, tips/margins/veins stay green longest. Lower vigour. Reduced yield."
* "Manganese: Young leaves mottled pale green, interveinal yellowing, reduced growth & slight loss in yield."

I was hoping that one of the forum experts might be able to tell exactly from my leaf! :-)
About the Author
jill
 
24th September 2013 3:08pm
#UserID: 7680
Posts: 4
View All jill's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
jill, magnesium def. seems to have a sort of green 'V' at the bottom. Yours doesn't. I'm mostly going by that. But it is quite hard to tell.

Boy, you're quick off the mark with your posts!
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
24th September 2013 3:11pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 24th September 2013 3:40pm
jill says...
Thanks, Julie. Is there any harm in feeding it with both iron chelates and manganese sulfate to counter both possible deficiencies? For both of them, DPI says "no known effects" to "symptoms of excess" - so I figure I can't do any harm?

p.s. I'm quick of the mark cos I'm bored at work and day dreaming about my garden. :-)
About the Author
jill
 
24th September 2013 3:57pm
#UserID: 7680
Posts: 4
View All jill's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
I would try one or the other first, or you may never really know which worked. That won't help your learning curve!

Don't know where you are, but unless the weather is warming up it might not respond straight away. Give it a couple of weeks - it won't die in the meantime.

.
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
24th September 2013 8:22pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
allybanana says...
I struggled for years trying to get a manderine happy that was in soil to alkaline the leaves always had the green vein look. I think a stack of old morter buried in the hill just above was the source of the problem. I tried the lot; epsom salts, trace elements, the applications of iron and even sulpher. The last two helped a bit, but after years of getting nowear in the end i mooved it and put in a alkaline loving carob in that spot. Both trees thrived.

When planting citrus i try to steer towards manderine rootstock which has the best alkaline tolerence. Trifoliata needs acid soils and when planting these trees i plant them deep, so the graft is below surface level to give the scion (top wood) a chance to root in.
About the Author
allybanana
 
25th September 2013 5:15am
#UserID: 4544
Posts: 352
View All allybanana's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Anonymous says...
You have to be careful with manderines they love free draining soils.You have make sure your soil has adequate sand levels to draw water from soggy materials such as clay, composts and manure.Next time you go to the nursery just lightly scratch the potting mix from a manderine pot you will see white crystals which is sand,plays a very important function.You dont need a lot of sand in soil as it will dry too quickly but a little is required .The finer the better,lawn topping or potting mix sand is good. Another thing you may want to try is planting them on a raised mound.
About the Author
AC1
 
25th September 2013 8:28pm
#UserID: 8055
Posts: 100
View All AC1's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Skyetelz says...
Can anyone help me with this question... I have a Meyer lemon tree about 2-3 years old I'm guessing. Some of my leaves are turning yellow and I also have roots coming up from the top soil. Not sure what this means, some sites say when the roots do that it's a good thing and mean new growth, some of the other sites say otherwise... Very confused:( my tree is really green on the top but the yellow leaves throw me off...please help
About the Author
Skyetelz
Yellow leaves on lemon tree
10th June 2014 7:13am
#UserID: 10057
Posts: 1
View All Skyetelz's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
christine horan says...
I made my potted lemon mix to dry(fear root rot) now I've got dry & brown roots .What can I do to regrow white healthy roots.what to make a better soil but not to drowns them? Please help me to regrow white moist roots back & leaves it lost due to dry mix & not watering fully?So much talk of winter root rot scared me! Please help my 3 yr. old lemon tree potted in wibterCold outdoors28 degrees. Photo only shows Lil tree inback under one yr doing very well in smaller pot and different soil mix
About the Author
Hottina44
Phila. Pa. suberbs indoor winter
20th December 2016 11:09am
#UserID: 12898
Posts: 6
View All Hottina44 's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Manfred says...
Lemon trees like water so you would need to overwater badly to get "e;root rot"e;. That could happen in your particular circumstance though.

Luckily for you, lemon trees also like extreme fertility, so even in a cold place I would be comfortable about potting one in almost 100% cow or sheep manure (say about 90% manure and 10% loamy soil) or horse manure with some well-rotted compost (50:50) and no soil. Break it up and aerate it well when you start it because the lemon won't thank you for soil disturbance when it is spreading its roots.

Give it a go. The horse manure mix will only last a year, or two at most, and it might not be something you'd want indoors, but I'd expect a better result at the spring break, so it would be my preference, all other things being equal.

Don't break up the roots when you are repotting, but shake the soil out lightly and carefully tease the roots into the new soil as you fill the pot. Be gentle. It sounds complicated, but once you start it will be instinctive.
About the Author
Manfred
Wamboin
21st December 2016 9:04pm
#UserID: 9565
Posts: 175
View All Manfred's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jakfruit etiquette says...
You would need to be cateful of having a drying pot mix and high fertilizer application. As the pot dries, the concentration of fert in the soil moisture increases. This could explain your dry brown roots etc, ie fertilizer injuty. For Citrus, they like water and drainage, the best pots are tall like a normal bucket, with the tree roots potted in the top third. Drainage is achieved by structure in the mix, ie bark chips, gravel, coarse coir. A too fine mix wont drain well.
Using a wetting agent may help revive the pot mix. A low rate of wetting agent should rehydrate the mix, and also increase drainage.
About the Author
jakfruit etiquette
vic
24th December 2016 8:29am
#UserID: 5133
Posts: 454
View All jakfruit etiquette's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Steven says...
If it were me unless its potted in something akin to orchid mix i wouldnt bother re-potting it. The best and simplest way ive found to prevent pots from drying out is to simply put a tray under the pot. You can get them suitable for almost any pot size at your local nursery. That little reservoir of water keeps the tree well hydrated and you dont need to water anywhere near as ofter. For fertility id add a generous amount of chicken pellets and a dozen or so compost worms. The worms will break down the potting mix/manure and keep the soil health. I find plants in pots do much better if you add compost worms.
About the Author
Steven
Eastern Melbourne
4th January 2017 10:32am
#UserID: 704
Posts: 322
View All Steven's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Kelvin from SG says...
Hi guys. I bought the plant 2 months ago, and place it indoor at the southern window . Singapore weather on day around 33 C or aka 91 F . In order not to overwater it , i water only when the soil is dry . I water moderately so is impossible for water to drain out from the holes.. maybe 3 seconds from a watering pot . I check with my finger and soil is moist from as deep as i can feel with my fingers. Before watering i will always insert my whole middle finger daily to check the sole moist before watering, will only water will the soil is dry.

Last week the weather was getting hot my plant start to lose leaves at alarming rate, maybe 5 per day on the ground .. and the leaves turning pale green and curled up. the pale green leaves are fragile that when i touched it, it will break and fall..I increase my watering slightly and add in oraganic fertilzer, but is not getting better: leaves fall off same rate and leaves start to curl up .

I not sure whether if is iron or magnesium deficiency , or lack of nutrients, underwatering or overwatering~, help!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6

Picture: 7
  
About the Author
Kelvin from SG
Singapore
14th May 2017 1:46am
#UserID: 16141
Posts: 2
View All Kelvin from SG's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Original Post was last edited: 14th May 2017 1:51am
Manfred says...
That's a tough one! I like your watering regime and I can't match your pictures with any deficiencies in any of my books.

Anyone?
About the Author
Manfred
Wamboin
15th May 2017 7:33pm
#UserID: 9565
Posts: 175
View All Manfred's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brain says...
I'm going to chime in. I suspect 2 reasons.

1/ It was grown as an outdoor plant but being indoors, the plant is not adjusting well and hence the leaves are shedding. It's also probably not getting enough sunlight. It likes to get 6+ hours sunlight. Think of it as 'shock'.

2/ the Watering. I suspect being indoors, it never received any rain flushes. So as you water each time, the minerals in the water is deposited in soil and is built up in the soil and so the plant is 'drowning in salt'. The leave shed is a sign that it's trying to displace the salt.

There is probably something you can do to try save the plant - but it is not guaranteed to work.

a) give the plant a 10 min shower - to wash the salt off. Just like you would when a plant gets rain.
b) i'd be safe and soak it in a bucket for 20 mins and change the water a few times.
c) water it with distilled water from now on
d) hold off any more fertiliser until the plant stabilised

You won't be able to fix any existing leaves and chances are the leaves will keep falling.

The only thing you can hope for is, the plant has residual energy to shoot out some new growth.

BTW, I'd buy a grow light - once you see new shoots.

About the Author
Brain
brisbane
16th May 2017 2:42pm
#UserID: 6289
Posts: 632
View All Brain's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Manfred says...
I'd expect to see wilting of the leaves if it was recent fertiliser shock or salt water and browning starting at the leaf edges if it was long-standing salt or fertiliser excess.
Kelvin's treatment of the plant seems impeccable to me. With careful watering like that the plant should even be able to take a fertiliser hit every now and again, even indoors.
I'm not much good at plant diseases, so I'd hesitate to suggest one, but leaves falling off like that seems like a symptom someone should recognise.
About the Author
Manfred
Wamboin
17th May 2017 1:24pm
#UserID: 9565
Posts: 175
View All Manfred's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Kelvin from SG says...
Thanks brain and Manfred. My guess was:
1) I let the soil dry for a day south sun , that result the young leaves to turn yellow drop and roots dry .

2)I suspect sulfur deficiency which the yellow leafs fits this cause. I watered with some less than half teaspoon Epsom salt a quarter gallon of water.

3) i suspect PH level slight alkaline level (tap water is slightly alkaline at 8 ), so i add less than half tea spoon rice vinegar on a quarter gallon of water .(3 days after I watered epsom salt) and when soil at moist level.(i still waiting for my moist and PH meter i bought online days ago. )

B4 Steps: i added fish emulsion and watering before these steps and it seems little help, leaves still dropping.


Observation After steps 1-3 :

1) I saw older leaves dark green leaves stop turning into lighter green color. The earlier symptoms was younger leafs turn light green and wilted and spread light green to older leafs.. and much older leafs have lighter green patches as of pic attached earlier. now older leafs stays ok. But the young leaves still fell.

2)i rake gently of the soil approx a thumb's depth, realise a number of broken roots. i think is dried rotten roots. I not sure whether i overwater or underwatered that result minor dead roots to be scattered around the soil after i rake.. i think is underwatered.


Conclusion: I will wait and see, i will heed your advice to increase watering to flush the salts and use distill water only .

About the Author
Kelvin from SG
Singapore
22nd May 2017 12:27am
#UserID: 16141
Posts: 2
View All Kelvin from SG's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jensen says...
Old garden, new user, my citrus trees do not thrive. One problem is the yellow leaves.
The garden has a thin layer of 'soil' on top of a lot of clay, which I 'treat' in selected spots.
I use shredded palm fronds for mulch. In what 'direction' would that change pH and chemicals (e g nitrogen, etc. )?

jensen

About the Author
jensen
innisfail
24th July 2017 12:19am
#UserID: 16572
Posts: 13
View All jensen's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Julie says...
'Yellow' is not very meaningful as a description. Have a look at this website to find out what might be lacking.

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus
About the Author
Julie
Roleystone WA
24th July 2017 6:40pm
#UserID: 154
Posts: 1639
View All Julie's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Manfred says...
Not enough information. How long have you been mulching the citrus? How far out from the tree do you mulch?
In the long run mulching will lower the pH (make it more acid0. At first. a new mulch will decrease available nitrogen causing the older leaves to yellow and die, but as the mulch ages it will add nitrogen and other nutrients.

Clay is good provided the roots don't stand in water. Citrus feed from shallow roots which go out to the dripline of the leaf canopy, so fertilise and mulch out that far. If you don't want to do that, keep the grass cut short but fertilise anyway. Give them some iron chelate too because that seems to be usually deficient in the tropics.

Full sun? That's what they like.
About the Author
Manfred
Wamboin
24th July 2017 8:12pm
#UserID: 9565
Posts: 175
View All Manfred's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
jensen says...
Yes, "e;Clay is good provided the roots don't stand in water."e;
But the lawn has about one cm of water standing on it after heavy rain.
-And I have been told that clay is acidic.
So, I tried to create some raised garden beds by burying some 'garden waste'.
(Before I planted the trees.)
-Then it occurred to me (later) that by adding dolomite and gypsum, and having organic material rotting underground and mulch on the surface I had no idea what happened to pH and chemistry. ...
The four different citrus trees are about a year old.
-And I have a lot to learn. ...
About the Author
jensen
INNISFAIL,4860,QLD
26th July 2017 3:47am
#UserID: 16572
Posts: 13
View All jensen's Edible Fruit Trees
Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)
Brain says...
clay in general is not the best for citrus, as there is a greater disposition for root rot.

what you really need is good drainage.

and most of the clay breakers will increase the pH to alkaline side

I suspect being in innisfail, a high rainfall area, most of the nutrients in soil is 'wash away'. Hence a possible explanation of why your leaves are yellowing. (But there could be other reasons).

As organic materials break down, they tend towards acidic side but the changes are very quite minor.

if you want acidic soil of right pH - after you have done a soil test - adding proper additives might be the go.

I would also advice, adding dynamic lifter, compost or worm castings to your citrus trees to see if you can get it to boost a little with bright green flushes.

lastly, consider growing citrus in big pots. It might be a better option in your challenged location.
About the Author
Brain
brisbane
26th July 2017 2:55pm
#UserID: 6289
Posts: 632
View All Brain's Edible Fruit Trees

Reply | | Remember to LIKE this Answer(0) LIKE this Question (0)

REPLY to this forum

Email: Password:
display Name: Suburb:  
Pictures: Add Another Picture
Body:
 
Remember to include a picture if possible

<< Back to Daleys Fruit Tree Forum