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Preparing Soil - Blueberries

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HappyEarth starts with ...
Hey everyone - I have successfully grown four different varieties of blueberries in pots over the last couple of years. I made up a potting mix using an azalea potting mix (to get an acid soil) and mixing that with coco-peat and organic matter. Well now its time to plant them in the ground!!! So .. I was wondering what other people do to prepare their soil for these acid loving fruit plants?

Ive heard of people buying peat moss (not very sustainable), mulching with pine needles and coffee grounds. Anyone have any good suggestions or ideas??
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HappyEarth1
Wollongong
16th November 2007 8:37pm
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Shaun says...
I was told to add a squeeze of lemon/orange juice to my Yates Thrive solution when I water my blueberries and camellias ..... and it worked wonders (& I got lots of blueberries) !!!
My blueberries (Sharpeblue & Ned Kelly varieties) are grown in self-watering pots, and the potting mix comprised of builders sand, used tea leaves, some compost / soil improvers and some water crystals.
So, you may wish to throw in a few over-ripe lemon (or other citrus) at the drip line of your blueberry plants if they are grown in the ground.
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Perth
19th November 2007 2:10am
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Roshan Fernando says...
Dear Sir/ Madam,

In Sri Lanka we manufacture and export “COCO PEAT” products (coconut pith) in various types to suit all needs of agricultural and nursery industry as well as animal sanitary use too in the world.

This beneficial substrate can be used as a substitute for “PEAT MOSS “ too.

Our products Category is subscribed in the website for further details.

If you are interested in our products . Pls search our website www.srilankancocopeat.com
& contact us.

I here with sending you the “E-mail broacher “ for your earliest convenience.

Your prompt & positive reply are very much appreciated.

Thanks & regards,

Mr. Roshan Fernando. (MD)

ASHANI FIBRE PRODUCTS (PVT) LTD,
THARANA,
MADAMPE (NW)
SRI LANKA.
Tel : +94 773978700
Fax : +94 322248461

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Roshan Fernando
Sri Lanka
28th August 2008 3:51pm
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Larry says...
Cow manure will provide the acidity needed for blueberries. As others have said fertilise with thrive and lemon juice.
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Larry
perth
28th August 2008 6:22pm
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Anonymous says...
Can you tell us what the pH of COCOPEAT is ?
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sydney
29th August 2008 5:52pm
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cici says...
Never use manure of any type on blueberries. Treat same as azalea and rhododendrons.
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cici
jindabyne australia
21st May 2009 9:52pm
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amanda says...
Hi HappyEarth - I use a pine bark mulch around my citrus trees. I have alkaline soil and find this really helps with the long-term control of the alkalinity. The cow poo I get is quite alkaline - maybe pH test 1st. It becomes acidic as it ages tho'. I might try the over-ripe citrus fruit trick on them too! (an ironic solution - but if it works...!?)
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amanda19
geraldton WA
21st May 2009 10:35pm
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amanda says...
PS - I tried coco-peat for mulch but it all blew away!
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amanda19
geraldton WA
21st May 2009 10:39pm
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amanda says...
happy earth - just looked at your web-site (I'm green with envy....!) - just a quick question - does the banna grass set any seed? I have heard of this stuff b4 and am interested in it as a wind break - but we have a shocking problem with african fountain grass here (a Penniseteum spp - not sure how spelt..) as well as a few others and I am always wary of introducing anything else to the mix..
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amanda19
geraldton WA
21st May 2009 11:24pm
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Julie says...
Anonymous, I don't remember the pH of the cocopeat, but when I used it some time ago it was very acid. I tested it with a pH kit.
I had planned to use it for growing seedlings, but decided not to.
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Roleystone WA
22nd May 2009 3:42pm
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tecko says...
From my experience (or rather observation), having grown 2 blueberry plants for the past (one year only), I think they do thrive in mult-mix and cow manure. One of my plants was planted in a half wine barrel loaded with multi-mix (from Waldeck's) and recently added with cow manure (also Waldeck's)- and this one has grown taller, is more bushy and has more branches and leaves. The other one that is planted on the ground (no multi-mix or cow manure) but NPK fed has not grown much taller, has only a few branches or leaves. My simple inference is that mult-mix and cow manure do impact on the productivity of this plant. However, I must add, that the one planted on the ground also has to share its ground space with some other plants.
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tecko1
perth
29th May 2009 10:33pm
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HappyEarth says...
Hi Amanda,

As far as I know, banna grass does not set any seed. It certainly is not a weed and is great as a fast growing windbreak. They use it in commercial orchards for that purpose.

Rich
www.happyearth.com.au
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Wollongong
31st May 2009 10:39am
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amanda says...
Thanks HappyEarth! Your web-site has been quite inspiring for me - as our block was just a paddock 3 yrs ago. I can appreciate your hard work. We are lucky to have one of the few 'arid' zone permaculturalists residing in town (Julie Firth). I plan on getting her up here one day! Hope your garden survived the recent floods ok.
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
1st June 2009 11:29am
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Julie says...
amanda, I noticed some bana grass today in my street,at the edge of an orchard. There were odd little clumps of it here and there,right up to the verge - certainly not a windbreak. It looked as though it had escaped from elsewhere.
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Roleystone WA
1st June 2009 6:35pm
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Dekka says...
Here is a link you might want to visit before growing Bana Grass.
http://www.weeds.org.au/cgi-bin/weedident.cgi?tpl=plant.tpl&state=&s=&ibra=all&card=G23
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Dekka
Newcastle
1st June 2009 10:25pm
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amanda says...
thanks julie - things have a very bad habit of becoming weeds here - so far I have (thru' no fault of my own):

african fountain grass
stemless thistle
purple thistle
crown beard
wild turnip (like canola)
a solanaceae (can't remember name)
bali/chillie needle grass
deadly nightshade
box thorn
pattersons curse

and then all the regular stuff!

I am just about to pull out some wattles that i purchased at a fete as I have a bad feeling that they are going to be a problem - full of pods even without water for 2 yrs...

I will look into this stuff very carefully and maybe talk to Julie too.
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amanda19
geraldton.wa
1st June 2009 10:30pm
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amanda says...
Thanks for link Dekka - not sure if it's same but that fact that u n julie have both alerted me makes me think I might just stick to my native acacias - they grow 3m in 2yrs and they belong here. I'm a bit neurotic about being the one to introduce the next 'rabbit'/'fox'/'gorse' or whatever!!
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amanda19
geraldton.wa
1st June 2009 11:41pm
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Dekka says...
Hi, Amanda
Yes. The Banna, Bana, or Barner Grass is actually a hybrid being Pennisetum purpureum X Pennisetum glauca.
It is on several local weed species lists in Queensland as well as being listed as an invasive weed in the Pacific Islands and Florida.
I think in Australia it is probably recorded as the weed generally known as Elephant Grass or Cow Cane and not always recognised as the specific hybrid.
I understand being neurotic about weeds...Whoever introduced Lantana, Bridal creeper and Madiera vine over here has a lot of guilt to live with...probably nurserymen.
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Dekka
Newcastle
2nd June 2009 1:36pm
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amanda says...
Ta dekka - I actually spent most of this weekend burning off our resident Penniset' - african fountain grass (as did both my neighbours on their 30 acres) It's hard to watch all that biomass go up in smoke - but there's nothing else for it - it's a totally (ob)noxious weed!
I have tried almost everything but it's root system is massive and full of corms that go dormant when u stress the plant. I'm slowly winning the war tho'
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amanda19
geraldton WA
2nd June 2009 3:37pm
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Julie says...
Hi everyone. Did anyone watch Australian Story last night? Mostly a personal story about Maarten Stapper and his struggle to get CSIRO to accept his ideas (he worked for them).

Biological farming was his thing, and the short interviews with farmers told it all.You might see some weeds (not all) differently after watching this.

It is repeated tonight (Tuesday) on ABC2 at 8.00. Or go to www.abc.net.au/austory for more info.



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Roleystone WA
2nd June 2009 4:15pm
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Julie says...
(Wish we had an edit button!) What acacias are you growing amanda? 3m in two years is pretty good.
When I move to Chidlow, eventually, I will need to plant a kangaroo-proof barrier, as we will not be allowed to have fences.
I was thinking of one of the prickly acacias - not native to WA, can't remember the name right now.
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Roleystone WA
2nd June 2009 4:24pm
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amanda says...
Hi julie..buggared if i know!! :) but I will take a photo and see what i can find out - they are all over the place here (indigenous). I have a really good prickly native too - so i'll snap that as well. Can I send to your e-mail address?

The one's I use for wind breaks get a litte bit of water tho' - but they are still very fast - on my driveway photo in blackwater topic there is one of the original windbreak trees left - it's on the corner - (it's been chopped a fair bit) It is not more than 2yrs old maybe even a bit less and the barrier is approx 3.7m high

sent off gooseberries this morning.
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amanda19
geraldton wa
2nd June 2009 4:44pm
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Julie says...
Yup, email is fine - but others might be interested as well, so putting it here sounds OK too.
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Roleystone WA
2nd June 2009 4:50pm
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Julie says...
Oops! I might be wrong about the 'Back to Earth' programme. I now think it is repeated on Saturday at 12.30. You can also view it on your computer through the link.

The ABC2 repeat is probably from the previous week.
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Roleystone WA
2nd June 2009 8:25pm
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Brad says...
Digging up this old topic as a warning to others. When I potted up my blueberries I had bulk potting mix which i tried to acidify. The pH was 5.5 but within months has risen to near 7!

I incorporated peat, coffee and lemon bits and mulched with pine needles. My best guess is that the organic acidic components broke down into neutral components in the soil quite quickly. (I knew lemon needed regular topping up but am surprised how high the pH got when my supply ran out.)

Time to add some Iron Sulphate which will get it back down and hang around longer.

PS don't bother with vinegar - that will be very acidic for a very short time
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Brad2
Como, Perth
6th March 2010 3:22pm
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Original Post was last edited: 6th March 2010 8:43pm
JUJUBE FOR SALE IN MELBOURNE says...
My blueberry plants had exactly the same problem. I used azaria mix when I potted them up.

I noticed 3 months ago that they did not wake up or grew after winter and I measured PH and found all soil was 7 so I have since added sulphate to correct the soil. My trees have started to grow.

Yes, I agree with Brad that Vinegar changed the soil PH for a couple of hours only.
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JUJUBE FOR SALE
Melbourne
6th March 2010 3:48pm
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Jim says...
Hi, I would just like to offer a little advice learned in my growing of Blueberries.
I have found that the most valuable Mulch/Growing medium is undoubtedly one of AGED PINEBARK.
My last berries were picked this AM 16/3/'10.
I have bushes around 1.6m tall which bear very well. They are mulched each year with Aged Pinebark with occasional doses of Seasol. Pruning of Old Wood seems essential for heavy cropping but this should be done with care.
Cheers and happy growimg, Jim.
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Jim13
NW Tasmania
16th March 2010 11:43am
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JUJUBE FOR SALE IN MELBOURNE says...
Hi Jim,

Many thanks for your valuable advice. Much appreciated. It is much cheaper solution then chasing the expensive peat moss and azaria potting mix.

Happy gardening.

Lucy.
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JUJUBE FOR SALE
Melbourne
16th March 2010 11:51am
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Mary says...
Hi Jim,
May I know the name of the blueberries you grew and how old are they? I just bought two plants and plan to grow them in pots.
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17th March 2010 9:55pm
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Anonymous says...
If you want to successfully grow different varieties of blueberries in pots, then your pot should contain an acid mix soil. Also soil should have a high water adsorbing capacity. So, it's good to use coco pet. Coco peat has an optimal water absorbing capacity and essential nutrients require for plantation.
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88
 
5th September 2013 10:40pm
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Chris says...
Good suggestions Anon. Coco peat contains nothing in the way nutrients.
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Chris
Sydney
6th September 2013 3:23pm
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BJ says...
It often contains horrifically high salt content though, so be sure to soak thoroughly a number of times before adding to the mix for sensitive plants like Blueberries.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
6th September 2013 3:26pm
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yry says...
Where did you learn of coco peats high salt content? ; somehow I doubt it as it would be an utter failure commercially if it were so.
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yry
 
7th September 2013 3:17pm
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starling says...
Coco peat is made from coconut husks, which is naturally quite high in sodium.

More expensive peat is processed to remove it--Cheap and nasty, not so much.

Hence the caveat "often" added by BJ.

S
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7th September 2013 4:35pm
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Original Post was last edited: 7th September 2013 4:37pm
roborthudson says...
Agree with starling - Coco peat is one of the best organic soil for any type of garden plants and vegetable growth. It has a great capacity to hold more water for a longer period of time and provide required ingredients for proper plant growth.

Coco peat maintains soil pH well and keep plants green and healthy.

To know more details about the benefits of using coco peat Click Here.
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roborthudson
 
27th September 2013 7:56pm
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Original Post was last edited: 27th September 2013 7:58pm
Boris Spasky says...
Except, except....the one brand available for retail in Australia, has in the past sold product with very high salt content, enough to kill seedlings and stunt plants. And Brunnings products are in general pretty poor in my experience.
Rob, there are no nutrients in coco peat. Reiterating something often enough doesn't make it true..
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Boris Spasky
 
27th September 2013 8:51pm
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amanda says...
Odd..I use the fine coir - and lots of it - every time I plant a tree here..(about 50 of them now - including more sensitive plants than blueberries)..and there are no signs of high sodium problems...??

It's also from Bunnings...but I never buy with the one/s with any additives...

Where there problems in the early days with treatments that they did to the coir (in the US..?) to satisfy some regulations...

It's also used in hydroponics/soil less growing.

I love it - it's a great soil conditioner and is far more resistant to degradation by fertiliser salts than wood based conditioners...plus it has the increased CEC and water holding capacity - and the worms love it too...
I use it as bedding material for my worms also.

I wonder which brand is the culprit - maybe a complaint to Bunno's is needed..
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amanda19
Leschenault (150km south of Perth)
28th September 2013 10:42am
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Brendan says...
Hi amanda, BorisS was talking about Brunnings (not Bunnings) brand.
But I have to agree with you, I have used a lot of coco peat/fine coir etc, never had any problems.
I like the ones with added fertilizer, especially the seed-raising coir blocks.
Finally bought 4 'Rooterpots' to marcott/air layer my avocado trees. Used coir seed-raising mix as I had no sphagnum moss :-( (Got 2 large & 2 small for $28 delivered :)
They are EXCELLENT!
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
29th September 2013 9:52am
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Original Post was last edited: 29th September 2013 9:54am
amanda says...
oops - missed that little "r" in there! Yes - I avoid that brand also to be honest...cheap n nasty.
What a great idea those Rooterpots are!? Makes life very easy - haven't seen them b4...can u choose the growing medium to put inside them then Brendan..?

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amanda19
Leschenault (150km south of Perth)
29th September 2013 12:18pm
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yry says...
As an aside to the issue of salt in the garden perhaps the following is of interest--- as many of us redirect the water from bathroom and laundry into the garden one of the issues to face is the varying and, sometimes, large quantities of sodium chloride in detergents band soaps. As a general rule liquids are lower in salt than powders; the cause being that salt is added to increase the bulk of powders. There is a list on the web that I found years ago that gives the breakdown of proprietry cleaning products and their salt content . After checking it out I settled on Dynamo liquid (which unfortunately I cannot name) for its low salt content and a high phosphate. Naturally, if there is a risk of stream contamination high phosphate would be best avoided.
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yry
 
29th September 2013 1:20pm
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Julie says...
I have been using Earth Choice detergents for years, for dishes and laundry. No sodium, and seems to be no phosphates.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
29th September 2013 1:29pm
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amanda says...
oops (again) - just checked and the brand of fine coir I use (in the Mega Block) and is actually Brunnings. No problems with it at all, anyway.
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amanda19
Leschenault (150km south of Perth)
29th September 2013 6:55pm
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Julie says...
My Misty blueberry, which I've had for a year,has quite a lot of fruit considering it has no pollinator (well, one. but it flowered much, much later, so doesn't count).

The leaves are definitely showing iron deficiency, so I gave it iron sulphate 10-11 days ago. Is it too soon to expect to see results? No change so far, but don't want to add more and maybe overdo it.

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Julie
Roleystone WA
12th November 2013 8:52pm
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Julie says...
Google was no help at all with this question, so I'm relying on someone here.

Please?

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Julie
Roleystone WA
13th November 2013 8:08pm
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kim says...
Hi Julie

While waiting for someone more knowledgeable to help with your query, I will say that I do vaguely remember reading somewhere that if you don't notice any improvement after 3-4 wks, then do another application. This is what I did with my jaboticabas. After 3 weeks and not noticing any changes, I did a second application and it was another 4 weeks or so before I noticed greener leaves.

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kim14
dianella
14th November 2013 5:46pm
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Julie says...
Thanks kim, I didn't think it would take so long. Patience!
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Julie
Roleystone WA
14th November 2013 8:10pm
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