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Plant Identification

    52 responses

Paul Ridding starts with ...
Does anybody know what sort of Fruit tree this is (see attached pictures)? Cheers, Paul.
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Picture: 2
 
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Paul Ridding
Kendall, NSW
5th December 2007 3:49pm
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Richard Walter says...
Hey Paul,

It looks like a Rose Apple - syzigium jambos. Beautiful, hardy tree with nice tasting fruits.

Have a great day :)

Rich
www.happyearth.com.au
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HappyEarth1
Wollongong
6th December 2007 5:47am
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Paul Ridding says...
Excellent, thanks Rich.

I like your website :)
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Paul Ridding
Kendall, NSW
6th December 2007 7:31am
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BJ says...
These two trees are growing in my father's rain forest in western Brisbane. I was hoping someone could help with an ID. two pictures of each.

First is very tall (30ft), single, slender trunked tree with red flowers both on the trunk and in canopy which I'm told turn into purple/black plum like fruit.

Second kind of looks a little like a Sapodilla, but unsure.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
7th March 2010 5:10pm
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speedy says...
hard to say for sure BJ, but it looks like
1&2 Davidsonia pruriens (Davidson Plum) fruit edible and good, very sour,
best cooked with sugar and maybe apple to extend it - plenty of flavour.
good for liquers too.

3&4 Randia fitzlannii (Native gardenia) fruit may be edible , but I cant imagine it to be anything great.
I'd grow it for sweet scented fls. and glossy lvs. though.
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NW Vic.
8th March 2010 11:10pm
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Nick says...
Heres a few trees/shrubs/whatevers that I need to identify. Any help is appreciated :) (Sorry theres a lot, just have a tonne of unknown plants in my front yard :P).
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Picture: 5

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Picture: 11

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Picture: 13

Picture: 14

Picture: 15
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
19th August 2011 8:17pm
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Julie says...
2 Looks like Hardenbergia

3 Known as poison bush. Nitrogen fixer, don't know the proper name. Easy to confuse with Tagasaste, which has white flowers, but is not poisonous.

6 Lantana sp

7 Wax flower - Eriostemon sp

11 Syngonium sp

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Julie
Roleystone WA
19th August 2011 9:13pm
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Original Post was last edited: 20th August 2011 6:44pm
amanda says...
Is no.15 a Butterfly bush? (Buddelia..or close spelling?) there's a yukky asparagus fern in the background there - they have to be removed over here now.
No.11 a type of devils ivy?
Agree with Julie No.2 and 6.
No.3 is very pretty.

Don't know any others.
I like these type of questions - they are fun Nick! Makes me realise how much I still have to learn ;)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
19th August 2011 9:40pm
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Nick says...
Thanks for the responses, I agree with numbers 2, 3 (Genista stenopetala I think..), 6 and 7. I dont think number 15 is a buddleja- the leaves seem to be too wide and I dont think theyd grow wild but I definitely agree about the asparagus fern- prickly little buggers. :)
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
19th August 2011 9:57pm
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Nick says...
Number 1 might be a variegated Aucuba japonica?
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
19th August 2011 10:08pm
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Nick says...
I think picture #5 is a really rare native. It layers super easily and seems to lose some leaves during winter.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
21st August 2011 1:08pm
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Speedy says...
Ok, I'll give it a go.

1. Aucuba japonica
2. Hardenbergia violacea (Aust.)
3. Cytisus sp. (Europe?)
4. Hetrocentron elegans (cent. Amer.)
5. ....Rosa sp. ?
6. Lantana camara (Sth Amer.)
7. Philotheca myoporoides ( syn. Eriostemon myoporoides (Australia)
8. Westringia fruticosa (Australia)
9. Garrya eliptica (California)
10. Asarium sp. (Nthn Hemispere somewhere)
11. same plant maybe or Araceae family at least
12. looks familiar.... shaded lvs. of Privet maybe?
13. ? Jasminum mesneyi ...if so, will have yellow fls. (SW. China ?)
14. Persoonia sp. (Australia)
15. Pomaderris sp. (Australia)

some, I'm not real sure of just by looking at pics... if I was in your yard next to them I might have a better idea of their id. It's a vibe thing :-P

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Speedy
Nthn Vic.
21st August 2011 9:32pm
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snottiegobble says...
No 3 . genistas self sow everywhere & the weeping laburnum is one of the most popular. yes all poisonous legumes.
No 9. Also known as the tassle bush or tree.
No 14. persoonia but not a snottygobble hey?:)
15.Pomaderris grow readily as understory in Vic, mountain forests. The flowers smell strongly of honey!
This is fun Nick, got any more?
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snottiegobble
Bunbury/Busso (smackin the middle)
22nd August 2011 1:12am
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Nick says...
Good job Speedy and SG, thats seems to be all of them except number 5. I'm convinced its a Rosa but I'll give the previous owner of the house a ring- its apparently rare! Heres some more plants (I know some of them, but theyre for a bit of fun) :)
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Picture: 2

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Picture: 5

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Picture: 9
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
23rd August 2011 7:24am
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Nick says...
Heres some more! One is a mysterious plant that popped up among my brassicas in the new veggie patch and the other 2 are beautiful legumes I found while taking a walk (theyre in the subfamily Faboideae/Papilionoideae- that narrows it down to about 12000 species, LOL):)
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
23rd August 2011 6:30pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
# 5 is a bergenia, hardy as all get out and shade tolerant to boot
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
24th August 2011 9:03am
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Nick says...
Here's the pics.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
2nd September 2011 11:51pm
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amanda says...
I have these guys growing in my garden...I love the black coral pea in pic 1 - it's a stunning flower. They are Kennedia's (running postman).

I watered them to get them established - but they have been on their own for a couple of years now - so they are damn tough :)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
3rd September 2011 11:42am
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Nick says...
Thanks so much amanda, do they grow easily from seed? :)
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
3rd September 2011 11:55am
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amanda says...
Can't say I have tried - but I reckon that they would. If the seed coat is scratched up a bit on some concrete or sandpaper - they will be so much faster to germinate. I haven't seen any pods on mine as yet.
I got a few types as tubestock - I lost most of them in the drought and didn't water them enuf'(but they were very young..) but the black one has survived no problems...
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
3rd September 2011 9:43pm
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allybanana says...
Geek fest I'm in :) Some comments on nicks 15

I have no idea on some agree with speedy on most but query a couple:

4 looks more like a fuschia note the entirely red unopened flower buds were as Heterocentron_elegans appears to have green buds see
http://www.encinos.org/imgs/fm18/r/Melastomataceae_Heterocentron_elegans_5570.html

5 could be a type of rose but possibly is a native rubus sp.

14 is not a persoonia sp. (yellow flowers) but a white flowered heath, it looks like there is fluff in the flowers mouth suggesting a type of Native Beard Heath, Leucopogon parviflorus at a rough guess. http://www.barwonbluff.com.au/bluff%20life/above%20waves/plants/bushes_trees/pages/beard%20heath.htm

Thanks Nick that was fun
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allybanana
Eden
4th September 2011 6:16pm
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Nick says...
Youre right speedy, pic 13 does have yellow flowers!
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
9th September 2011 7:09pm
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Nick says...
No. 5 has finally flowered!! I hope its flower can help with the identification.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
13th October 2011 9:42pm
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Jenny says...
I often exchange fruit and produce with my Chinese neighbour and yesterday the grandmother (who doesn't speak any english) gave me these plants. One type looks to me like some sort of capsicum/chilli ? and the other one some sort of melon could it be a winter melon? Does anyone know?
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Jenny
Brisbane
27th October 2012 11:34am
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Julie says...
The first one could well be a chili, but capsicum and chili are almost identical when young. I find chillies have smaller leaves as they grow,

No idea on #2, could be anything from the squash family at this stage.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
27th October 2012 8:29pm
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Brain says...
#2 based on the fact that the stems has strong fine hairs and being a Chinese melon of some sort, it is likely to be "hairy melon". They are quite good when stir fried in low/medium heat and garnish with a bit of pork or beef and dried shrimps. (Note: educated guess only, not 100% sure).

Though it is similar to the winter melon, where it also has fine hairs but your pic shows the hair being quite sharp and strong.

Good luck.
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Brain
Brisbane
28th October 2012 2:31am
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Mike says...
First one looks like a chili and leaves get smaller with age.
Brain is right about the second that it is one of the winter melons probably wax or hairy melon.Fahk yeow is how thais say it but don't say it in mixed company.It has many uses like curries,a dessert base,soups as well as described by Brain like edible luffa.
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28th October 2012 8:15am
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MaryT says...
Jenny if a Chinese grandmother gives you anything grow it and if it turns out to be not to your liking you bet someone else on this forum would love to have it or the seeds from it. The chillies with large leaves are good eating (the leaves, that is) and is supposedly very good for relieving arthritic pains. Please note I am not dispensing medical advice, just what MY grandmother used to do.
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MaryT
Sydney
28th October 2012 9:36am
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Jenny says...
Thanks all for your responses, I have planted everything and will see what happens! Very happy to share seeds later on. Mary T how do you eat the chilli leaves? cooked or raw in a salad? And is it just this type or any chilli? I hope you are feeling better, too.
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Jenny
Brisbane
28th October 2012 6:27pm
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MaryT says...
Jenny we seldom eat raw food so the chilli leaves are usually cooked in a light soup (like in noodle soups) or in a stir fry until they're just wilted. Thanks for your well wishes; I have not sat down for two weeks now (sciatica) but I can stand and walk and lie down so it's business as usual. Typing this standing up with my computer propped up with the Encyclopaedia Botanica and Thibodeau's Anatomy and Phisiology and a large ring folder for its wedged shape :)
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MaryT
Sydney
28th October 2012 7:20pm
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Original Post was last edited: 29th October 2012 9:38am
JohnMc1 says...
Can anyone ident this bush? I know it looks similar to Goji Berry, but the fruit is not pleasant, quite bitter.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
29th April 2014 3:29pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Lycium chinense ??
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
29th April 2014 4:15pm
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JohnMc1 says...
If it is Lycium chinensis, it's probably why I have it. Fruit, leaves and young shoots are edible. I think it originally came from Jujube Lucy.

"Chinese boxthorn is a major Chinese tonic herb with a history of almost 2,000 years of medicinal use"
Chinese Lycium contains powerful antioxidants like flavonoids, more beta-carotene than carrots, and Vitamin C. It's also loaded with vitamin A, B1, B2, B6 and E, as well as amino acids, polysaccharides and fatty acids. Lycium is amazingly rich in Zeaxantine, which is about 40 times higher than corn (18mcg/gFW).
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
29th April 2014 5:40pm
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JUJUBE FOR SALE says...
Hi John,

I bought mine as a bunch of cuttings for soup in an Asian store and planted years ago. I don't know the name but fruits, leaves and young shoots are edible. I think I gave you a cutting few years ago.

Mine has lots of problem ie fungus and rarely got fruit. Yours is doing very well. Dried fruits are added to savory dishes at important occasion according to the book "herbs and how to use" of Penny Woodward

Happy gardening.

Lucy.
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JUJUBE FOR SALE
MELBOURNE
30th April 2014 6:45am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th April 2014 6:45am
MaryT says...
Yes it's a nice soup vegetable; only the young leaves are used. John Mc I would love to grow it. I'd never seen it with berries so I didn't recognise it. Have to say I have not noticed their being sold in Sydney. From memory it was always served with slivers of poached pig's liver and the leaves are added to the stock at the end to wilt it. Very quick soup.
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MaryT
Sydney
30th April 2014 7:30am
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JohnMc1 says...
Thanks Jujube Lucy, I think I saw bunches at Harris Farm markets, once.
Actually, now the fruit is fully ripe, it's not that bitter - bland with just a slight bitter aftertaste, not unpleasant. Not as sweet as Goji.
Mary, I have your address buried deep inside my computer somewhere, could you contact me at
coastalskylightatbpcom

I'll get you a nice big mature section with plenty of roots.

slivers of poached pig's liver?
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
30th April 2014 6:39pm
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MaryT says...
Email sent, John. Thanks so much. Pig's liver, yes, hahaha
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MaryT
Sydney
30th April 2014 6:57pm
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Original Post was last edited: 3rd May 2014 12:58pm
TMary says...
JohnMc1 I went to Paddy's this morning and found some gouji greens - are these the same as what you were going to send me? If so, you don't have to anymore. Thanks anyway. :)
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TMary
Neutral Bay NSW
17th May 2014 2:40pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Yes, that looks like it Mary. Is it called Gouji greens? How do you use it? I have Monday off, so if you decide you still want me to send you some with roots, let me know by then.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
17th May 2014 5:21pm
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MaryT says...
John, Gouji actually should be spelt Gouqi in Mandarin -it is Chinese for Goji but I call it Gouji greens just to distinguish it from the berries. On second thoughts I think I would welcome some rooted cuttings; I'm a bit snowed under with chores atm and would welcome any shortcuts :) Thanks John.
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MaryT
Sydney
17th May 2014 6:04pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Consider it done on Monday, Mary. You would probably have some difficulty striking them at this time of year unless you have heat assistance.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
17th May 2014 9:21pm
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TMary says...
Thanks John - my most sophisticated equipment is a zip lock bag :). It works!
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TMary
Neutral Bay NSW
18th May 2014 4:43am
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MaryT says...
Thanks, John! The parcel has arrived and the cuttings well bedded down. Fingers crossed. Wow the berries are BITTER but the Chinese say bitterness is good medicine! :)
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MaryT
Sydney
22nd May 2014 4:08pm
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JohnMc1 says...
Yes I thought I'd throw in a branch full of berries for you to sample. They could easily be mistaken for Goji, only for the bitterness.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
22nd May 2014 4:52pm
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MaryT says...
I'll definitely try to sprout some of those seeds from the berries, John. I'll only be harvesting the leaves. Instead of pig's livers I will use them to make a simple soup with a salted duck's egg; another classic.
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MaryT
Sydney
22nd May 2014 8:15pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd May 2014 8:15pm
JohnMc1 says...
That mildew only appeared after the cold snap last week.
One of my ambitions in life is to learn how to cook real authentic Chinese.
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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
23rd May 2014 5:17pm
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MaryT says...
There are many schools of Chinese food, John. China is a big place. I'm Cantonese but growing up in Hong Kong I am familiar with most other schools of Chinese cuisine. One day I'll come and visit your orchard and give you a quick lesson :)
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MaryT
Sydney
23rd May 2014 5:43pm
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JohnMc1 says...
I'm no cook, but fruit for lessons would be a good trade.


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John Mc
Warnervale NSW
23rd May 2014 9:12pm
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MaryT says...
Sounds good to me, John. Will talk after my visitors have come and gone.
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MaryT
Sydney
24th May 2014 7:34am
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Linton says...
Please identify this tree.

I've got no idea what it is. Thanks.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
30th November 2014 8:22pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
Looks like a Ficus, a Cluster Fig type.
Not sure which species.
Check again later to see if the fruit change colour. Its probably edible, but take care as some FNQ Ficus species have irritating sap.
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/balharsh/4451516590/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/29289211@N05/4027176203/
If its a red fruited type Ficus racemosa they can be quite pleasent to eat.
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jakfruit etiquette
vic
30th November 2014 9:43pm
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Thao says...
It's Ficus racemosa (Ficus glomerata). The fruits are edible. In Vietnam, we use the fruits to make pickles and for cooking. We also eat young leaves.
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Thao
Sydney
30th November 2014 10:04pm
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Original Post was last edited: 30th November 2014 10:04pm
MIke T1 says...
The foliage and fruiting habit look like F.racemosa more than most of the other common cluster figs but fruit should go red.There are 2 forms of F.racemosa one that is insipid to eat and the other is far worse.It is not F.septica or F.copiosa but the other candidates names escape me at the moment.
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MIke T1
cairns
30th November 2014 10:06pm
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