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Tropical Fruit Tree

    110 responses

Andrew starts with ...
Hi all,

Can anyone direct me to a nursery that sell the following fruit tree:

1. Mangosteen
2. Durian
3. Rambutan
4. Pummelo (Red Flesh)

Many Thanks!!

Andrew
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Andy3
Adelaide
12th December 2007 12:50pm
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Correy says...
Daleys sells:

yellow mangosteen

Pummelo Carters Red - (Reddy pink Fleshed)

I saw the Durian at Tropical Fruit World

and I hear that the Rambutan is similar to a lychee perhaps you could tell me more about it.

Here is a list of recommended retail nurseries

Unfortunately no South Australia Fruit Tree Nurseries that I am aware of.
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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
12th December 2007 8:23pm
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Andrew says...
Thank Correy,

I was after purple Mangosteen (Very hard shell and very sweet), Durian tree I am after not durian jam, yes Pummelo red I am after, but none available at Daleys fruit at the moment.
Rambutan look like Lychee, but with hairy skin and similar flesh.

Search for Rambutan in Google as image and it will come up heap of pictures.

Best Regards

Andrew
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Andy3
Adelaide
13th December 2007 8:06am
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Correy says...
I asked about the Durian and apparently they are too tropical for us.

I have a contact for you in North QLD in Mossman. He is a fellow by the name of Don Gray.

(07) 4094 1181


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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
13th December 2007 8:53am
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Scott G says...
Has anyone noticed that the fruit trees in Bunnings have changed?

Gone are the grafted trees in the tall bags. They have been replaced by round pots with seedling fruit trees. They look very young and aren't grafted. I pity the people who buy them unknowingly and have to wait many years to get fruit. They had a Loquat that looked to be 1 year old or less. It may be another 6 years before it fruits!

I don't know if it is just the store nearest to me or all Bunnings stores.

To all you people who can't tell the difference that I am talking about, BEWARE.
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Scott G
Gold Coast
13th December 2007 9:49am
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anon says...
Sad to say but it is usual for seedling loquat to take anything up to 11 years to fruit.
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anon1
bundaberg
13th December 2007 12:25pm
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Andrew says...
Thanks Correy,

I rang them and they says they don't have any tropical fruit tree I am after.

That's fine. I was going to experimenting with it, that's all.

no problem

Andrew
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Andy3
Adelaide
13th December 2007 3:44pm
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Julie says...
Yes I agree with Scott that BUNNINGS have fruit trees for sale but most of them are seedlings and when ask for advice they are not sure (one asked another if he or she knew about that tree, that is not good enough to me) so I don't buy from them.

I think I would rather buy from a specific store where they personally give you lots of advice on how to look after your stuff.
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Oakleigh
14th December 2007 7:18am
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Correy says...
Andrew I would be very surprised if you could grow some of those fruit trees down in Adelaide You must have a poly house. It is always good fun trying to grow something out of it's climatic range though.

At Daleys the Staff are fruit tree fanatics. I am only new (about 3 years) but some of the others have huge orchids where they do a lot of experimenting with. Growing fruit trees and rainforest trees is a lifestyle choice for them. Having your own orchid to experiment with is the best way to learn along with reading and brushing shoulders with those in the know.
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Correy
Woolloongabba
14th December 2007 9:25am
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Andrew says...
That's right Correy,

I would love to experimenting full tropical fruit tree, although I am new to fruit tree growing and planting. Because if I am successful I will have heaps in return from fruiting, I love those tree. Especially Durian, Rambutan, Mangosteen and many more rare fruit tree. I don't really like growing native tree cos I reckon is a waste of space. This is only a personal opinion.


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Andy3
Adelaide
14th December 2007 10:31am
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Andrew says...
I am still finding info on "how to planting tree on ground", "how to looking after fruit tree" and etc.
If anyone have any info on what soil to use and how to maintain it and post it in here. That will be great!

Andrew
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Andy3
Adelaide
14th December 2007 10:37am
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Correy says...
Might be worthwhile

The Complete Book of Fruit Growing in Australia by Louis Glowinski
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Correy
Woolloongabba
14th December 2007 10:55am
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Adrianna Cooper says...
Hi Andrew, I was wondering have you found a supplier for the Purple skinned with white flesh mangosteen as I have been searching as well I only seem to get juice in my searches. I would like to purchase a tree as well.

Adrianna
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Adrianna Cooper
Logan Village
4th January 2008 8:44am
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Anonymous says...
Hi Adrianna,

Sorry to reply late. I was on holiday.
I have found a supplier who can supply purple Mangosteen and other rare fruit tree. This is their business name and details as followed:
" Sunshine Coast Gardeners Paradise "
1073 Browns Creek Road,
Eewah Vale via Eumundi
Qld, Australia 4562
Ph: (07) 5442 8492
Fax: (07) 5442 8088
Email: plants@gardenersparadise.com.au

Hope that help. Good Luck!

Andrew
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Adrianna Cooper says...
thanks heaps Andrew, we will havr to go for a drive soon and check it out.
Adrianna
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Adrianna Cooper
Logan Village
5th January 2008 8:07pm
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John says...
Hay you can get all those and grow them here in from Q. That is except for duriums. They can grow to 350 ft and need 7 tones h2o a day when in flower, need tones of food and large amounts of space. As for 1. Mangosteen, Rambutan Pummelo's r easy to grow here. I have pawpaws,jaks,brazilian cust apple, choco fruit, bananas and mangoes. Know one can tell me thats not possible.
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John10
SB South Australia
10th January 2008 8:28pm
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Bsilver says...
Hmm. Rambutan in South Australia? I'd like to see that>
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Bsilver
sydney
11th January 2008 5:33am
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John says...
Hay Bsilver, Rambutans in SA, give me 36 months and I will show you the fruit along with paws,jacks, custards,guavas etc
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John10
SB South Australia
11th January 2008 5:47am
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Adrianna Cooper says...
re Jack fruit how long have you been growing it because mine was about 8 ft tall and looking very healthy then we had a freek frost and killed it instantly it was in for about 4 years and growing very well in QLD.
so good luck with your in SA
Adrianna
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Adrianna Cooper
Logan Village
11th January 2008 10:46am
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Andrew says...
So John, are you in the process of growing those tropical fruit tree or you already have success with them?

Because I am also live in SA and I have great interest in them.

Andrew
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Andy3
Adelaide
11th January 2008 11:07am
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John says...
Hay everyone, there is no such thing as "it carnt be done". Frost are manageble, using those reflectors for your car windows for protection. My Jasks have grown 3 ft in since i got them, and have lost all the original leaves, but grow constant new ones. Here in SA u need 20 litres water a day,for these trees but not so they have wet feet. U need to feed large amounts of organic F,minerals and trace elements and the monthly handfull of potash is esential. I have frosts to -2 for about 250+hours a year.My paws were about ten inch when delivered. They are now about 3 feet and thick. Thats 3 months, use the 3rd gen version for SA. This time next year I will be eating its fruit. Mangoes grow as well here as any tropical area. Guava's, I have 8 growing and they double their size every 3 months. Lady fingers, i have six off, again if you can get them over the frosts and winter you should get good hands of bananas in hte second summer. My star friut is very sensitive to frost, it has not grown much but is shooting new leaves daily.
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John10
SB South Australia
11th January 2008 4:37pm
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Adrianna Cooper says...
hay John sounds like you found the perfect place in SA well done! better than most of us here in Qld. My orchard is growing very well and i had my second crop of plums this year. 5 jars of jam, 6 jars of preserved fruit and heaps to eat fresh. but my plumcot hasnt fruited they say it isnt cold enough to set fruit any suggestions?
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Adrianna Cooper
Logan Village
12th January 2008 6:51am
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John says...
hello adrianna, I have plenty of plums and apricots but no plumcots. I have problems with my jap plums in that they require over 300 hrs of frosts. The apricots when in flower, we get very strong winds that blow them of. I hand polinate both at that time of year for small rewards. There are hundreds of plumcots been planted around this area but I have never seen any fruit from them. Again I belive they require 350+ hours of frost and no winds when flowering.However if the trees are cell strong you may get away with it. eg give the tree extra fertilizers earlier so the tree is stronger just on flowering rather than fertilizing as flowering occurs. (with a little extra potash if you have a sandy dase).
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John10
SB South Australia
12th January 2008 4:35pm
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Adrianna Cooper says...
thanks John i'll give it a try. The tree is very healthy looking and had lots of flowers but just didnt set fruit.
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Adrianna Cooper
Logan Village
14th January 2008 8:34am
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Steven says...
Can anybody help me.

I am looking for a Chocolate tree (Theobroma cacao) preferably a forastero variety or a forastero/criollo hybrid. If anyone has any ideas where i can purchase one from please let me know.

Thanks

Steven
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Steven
Melbourne East
14th March 2008 4:39pm
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peter says...
andrew,
i know where ther is a large
pammelo tree growing in adelaide.
i am fairly sure it is a pink
fleshed type.
you could probably get a branch
to strike if it is possible.
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peter30001
adelaide
14th March 2008 5:46pm
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Michael says...
this is photo of a huge duian tree in Bohol philippines. suppliers of tropical fruit trees Limberlost Nursery Cairns 0740551262 sell Purple mangosteen, durian, Cacao, rambutan, langsat duku. but there expensive i.e. mangosteen $40 plus
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Michael2
brisbane
21st March 2008 8:21am
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Ian says...
Yes mate, you are right. The purple mangosteen is wonderful, and available across Asia. In Thailand it is "mung quot" or something sounding like that.
I bought a tree in a Qld nursery, some years later it fruited..yellow! I'd say it was 90% inedible. Still trying.
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Ian4
Mackay
21st March 2008 11:30am
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Steven says...
Thanks alot for that Michael.

I will get in contact with Limberlost Nursery after easter.

Steven
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Steven
Melbourne East
22nd March 2008 2:12pm
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Leeza says...
Andrew you can get the tropical fruit trees from Montoso Gardens. Search the web for the nursery, you can buy the trees from this nursery and they also air mail it.
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Leeza
 
27th April 2008 4:07am
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Anonymous says...
really, that will be great. Thank you very much Leeza

Much Appreciated

Andrew
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Andrew says...
really, that will be great. Thank you very much Leeza

Much Appreciated

Andrew
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Andrew3
Adelaide
5th May 2008 11:22am
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Kelly says...
I am trying to find out what type of fruit this is and whether poisonous or edible. It is on my cacao farm and has a brownich green leathery skin. It opens naturally horizontally and exposes a large bright orange red seed cluster in the middle, half circle shape surrounded by fruit of rubbery greenish yellow texture. One of the Gnobe Bugle Indians that works on our farm called it cimarron and said it was not good to eat. But they have said that about many fruits we have found to be edible such as Hawaiian papaya:). It reminds me of the Jamaican Ackee the way it opens but the color and shape are wrong. Maybe it is some relative. It is the shape of a guava more or less. It has no smell that i can detect. Any help would be appreciated.
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Kelly1
Shepherd Island, Bocas del toro, Panama
28th June 2008 2:24am
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fruitist says...
I think Don Gray of Mossman has not been into tropical fruits since the death of his wife a few years ago.
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fruitist
Brisbane south
13th September 2008 3:37am
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j sargent says...
yes have noticed the fruit trees in bunnings have changed in my area as well which is very disapointing
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jsargent
howard qld
3rd December 2008 10:13am
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virginny says...
there's a huge yellow mangosteen in the Cairns Botanic garden . Its incumbent on visitors to eat the fruit as it represents a hazard to anyone walking under the tree (as I explained to the gardner)The taste is good but a bit challenging ,lacking sweetness.
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sydney
23rd June 2009 5:51pm
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vijay says...
I would like know if anyone can guide where could i get the rambutan,mangostine,jackfruit and durian trees (miniature type -short trees) grafted ones that will be helpfull.
thank you

vijay
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vijay2
brisbane
4th September 2010 11:03am
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Gaston Delor BITYO says...
Hi Andrew,
We can just find Mangosteen and Rambutan
We are in Yaoundé, Cameroon
How many of them do you need?

Gaston
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Gaston Delor BITYO
Yaounde, Cameroon
9th January 2011 7:35am
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fruitist says...
I still have 3 Durian, 1 Mangosteen and a few Jackfruit (crispy aril) seedlings here in Brisbane.
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9th January 2011 1:36pm
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Terry says...
Who can tell me where to buy the Guanabana/Graviola/soursop tree
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Terry10
Caboolture Qld
25th February 2011 12:30pm
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Mike says...
Durian,mangosteen,rambutan and the longkong group are equatorial and even Townsville is an unlikely gig for them.In thailand 18 latitude is their extreme.Good varieties are never in commercial nurseries but with growers and private propagators around Daintree and Innisfail to Mission Beach.
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Cairns
12th June 2011 1:26pm
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BJ says...
I thought both Mangosteen and Rambutan have been grown and fruited outside at 25N in the US.
After seeing a very healthy Langsat here, I dont doubt they can fruit here.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
12th June 2011 5:30pm
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fruitist says...
BJ, I think you meant to say "I don't doubt they can't fruit here"?? Is the healthy Langsat tree that you referred to in my garden? I have a LongDong and a Duku but not Langsat.
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12th June 2011 6:23pm
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Mike says...
I should have clarified with Lansium domesticum.It is a composite species with hundreds od forms, Duku and Kokason being equatorial.Duku-langsat is near equatorial,Longkong is tropical with langsat extending further into higher latitudes.Plantations in Utteradit(langsat) would experience winters like those in Townsville.
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Cairns
12th June 2011 10:58pm
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Mike says...
Durian and mangosteen in particular are really unlikely even in the south of Florida but Hawai is a special maritime example.It would be interesting to see the farthest south they,rambutans and langsat have fruited in Australia.They don't last long on even the warmest parts of the Atherton tableland.Equatorials are not cyclone adapted like tropicals and some sub-tropicals and get trashed.
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Cairns
13th June 2011 7:04pm
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fruitist says...
Mike, are you sure you are going to eat your hat if I can prove that Mangosteen has been grown and fruited outside of Tropic of Capricorn (23S) and Cancer (23N)? If I tried very very hard, I may even get a zoom-in using Google Earth to show the tree and some fruits there.
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14th June 2011 3:02pm
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fruitist says...
And I won't include Hawaii as it is inside the envelope.
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14th June 2011 3:04pm
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Mike says...
I better think about that.Maybe there are some warm maritme spots but I'll stand corrected if it is true.I've seen what 4 celcius and dry winds do to them.It is the purple mangosteen we're talking about?
I know the trouble they had on the southern tip of Florida.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 4:42pm
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fruitist says...
yep, Garcinia mangostana.
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14th June 2011 5:51pm
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Mike says...
So where is this mangosteen tree Taiwan,Okinawa,Bamahas? Surely not queensland.

Did you know there is some genetically variability in them in spite of their parthenocarpy.PS had some whopping Borneo fruit that tasted different.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 6:12pm
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fruitist says...
Eat your hat out! Bill Whitman had a few fruit bearing Mangosteen trees in his property in Florida. If you doubt the following web pages, ask David Chandlee first. I think he has been to Bill's place before as David is from Florida too. If not, David can tell you another person in FNQ who has been to the property and seen the famous Mangosteen.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/04/us/04whitman.html

http://www.quisqualis.com/whitman_tribute.html

http://www.skyfieldtropical.com/encyclopedia/mangosteen/

I won't try to get the coordinates of the trees.
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14th June 2011 6:28pm
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fruitist says...
http://www.quisqualis.com/whitman_tribute.html

All those who wrote the condolence messages have corresponded with me and most have swapped seeds with me.

Bill is sadly missed. What a pioneer and experimenter of growing rare fruits.
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14th June 2011 6:37pm
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BJ says...
Yes, that is what I meant in the 25N comment above. By my calculations the Whitman orchard should be 25N.
Also, yes, i did mean your tree. I think it was the Duku.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
14th June 2011 6:48pm
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Mike says...
Will had langsat but no fruit I believe and I thought his mangosteens were always casualties.It would be around 25 and they take some 'robust interventionist action' to keep out the cold.I have read a fair bit about homestead and whitman but that success evaded my attention.
Fair enough but I might hold back on the eating of my hat.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 7:12pm
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fruitist says...
My LongDong is 2.5 times bigger than the Duku. A few months ago, for the Duku, I inadvertently knocked off one of the two branches at the top when I tried to tidy some dead branches. You are right that Florida is around 25N.
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14th June 2011 7:20pm
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fruitist says...
I think Bill may also have success in fruiting Rambutan and Langsat. Not too sure. Tried to call David for confirm but he was not in. I won't email hose overseas collectors as I have been in retirement for the last 6 years.
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14th June 2011 7:29pm
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Mike says...
I believe it but the duku must be on life support.Longkong/dokong has a shot at cold tolerance as does langsat.Duku-langsat (not a cross),kokasan and Duku are hard core equatorial and would be more challenging.
Rambutan as well? It is a stretch and next you'll say durian also.
I have the reverse problem of being too warm for many fruit trees I have tried.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 7:41pm
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fruitist says...
All my trees are planted 1 foot below soil level. That is, the top of the planter bag is 1 foot below ground. Both Duku, LongDong, Durian are growing robustly in the open in shady colder part of the garden. In fact, the Durian is the most robust. One seedling was 4 ft tall after 12 months. Unfortunately I pruned hard down that seedling just before Winter and it hasn't recovered for the last 4 years due to being in a cold and shady spot. I also had 2 Rambutans growing well beofre I gave them away in August last year. I still have some Duku and Longdong in planter bags in cold shady area.
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14th June 2011 7:50pm
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Mike says...
Well I am surprised but fruiting is another matter especially for seedlings.Lansium and D.zibethinus could take 20 years even if they throw off the shackles and boom. People in Cooktown have lost durians to the cold when they plant the wrong variety.Red Prawn is a more cold tolerant variety and seedlings are more hardy.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 7:59pm
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fruitist says...
What about Keranji (Dialum indicum). I have one growing too intil I lended it to a friend who is currently looking after it in his place in Brisbane.
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14th June 2011 8:00pm
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fruitist says...
The durian cultivar I have is called pekapoo if I remember correctly. Seeds from FNQ. Very hardy here.
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14th June 2011 8:07pm
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Mike says...
I have heard of hundreds of cultivars and I thought all in Oz but that one escapes me.Could it be Pomoho from Zapalla named after an Hawaiin montong?
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14th June 2011 8:12pm
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fruitist says...
Sorry, I dug up my file. It is Sepangu not Pekapoo. Was reading too many "poo" posts. There are many cultivars in Malaysia and Thailand, such as D24, Sultan, Musan King (aka durian Kunyit in Malay, Cat Mountain King in Mandarin and Mao Shan Won in Cantonese. Durian Kunyit is believed to have originated from Gua Musang in the Malaysian state of Kelantan. Its yellowish flesh resembles Kunyit, Malay word for Turmeric), Golden Phoenix (aka Kim Hong), Xo, Taiyuan (aka Two Circle)
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14th June 2011 8:21pm
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fruitist says...
I have sampled some of them...

Xo – Strong bitter taste. Very soft texture. Slight turpentine smell.

太原/Taiyuan/Too Circle – Taiyan has white pulp. Dry taste. Strong fragrance, you can smell it from a distance. Its main characteristic is it has many arils.

D175 (UdangMerah or RedPrawn) - From Penang, more cool hardy than other clones. Probably grown in high elevation on hill slopes. The fruit is fairly large (1.5-3kg) elongate-ellipsoid with brown green rind and small spines. The flesh is creamy sweet, thick, soft, fine and yellow.

Oh, I have a large Engkala tree growing too, about 15 ft tall. Also Kepple Apple. There are equatorial too.


金凤/Golden Phoenix/Kim Hong - a very special durian. It has a small body and different taste with other durian type. When you eat the pulp, you will get its refreshing and delicious feel.



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14th June 2011 8:28pm
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fruitist says...
Another durian only found in Borneo.
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14th June 2011 8:34pm
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fruitist says...
That bunches of Durian is called Rian Isu or or Buah Isu or Isu in short. Buah means fruit in Malay. I believe the botanical name is Durio isu or D. oblingus. It has supposed only 4 lobes compared to all other species which have 5 lobes. But the fruits I had had 5 lobes. Incidentally there is another durian called Isa locally, its botanical name is Durio graveolens.
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14th June 2011 8:43pm
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fruitist says...
I just posted picures of other durians before the last 2 posts, But the post hasn't appeared yet. Here it goes...

Giant Durians I saw in Sabah. The size is twice larger.
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14th June 2011 8:45pm
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Mike says...
Thailand has 300, Malaysia 100 of their own.D175 is an anomaly coming from Penang lowlands and being cold tolerant, I also have a small Penang 88. There is a world of variations and flesh colours.D24 doesn't go well here and is overated. Kunyit may be exceptional D197.Anyway beside the unexpected tolerance of D175,kradum thong is grown in cool areas and Laplaes are reputed to handle the lowest temperatures.D.macrantha that is really another wild red fleshed zibethinus is very cold tolerant also.
Kepples are Javanese but I would expect them to be tough.I was disappointed with their fruit and they went to the orchard in the sky.Enkala growing well is impressive.
You certainly pushing back the frontiers.
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Cairns
14th June 2011 8:47pm
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fruitist says...
D24 Durian....

D24 – This is the most important commercial variety in Malaysia, originated from Bukit Merah, Perak. It was registered in 1937. The tree is large (20m) with a broad, pyramidal canopy. Close branching. It flowers regularly and bears 100-150 fruits per tree per year. Each fruit is about 1-2 kg, ellipsoid to oval shape with thick, light green rind and 1-4 arils per locule. The flesh is yellow, thick, firm, smooth, sweet and nutty with a slightly bitter taste. Unfortunately it is extremely susceptible to Phytophthora and also exhibits physiological uneven pulp ripening. (Not confirmed: The base of D24 has a flat round spot about the size of a 10 cent coin with seams radiating out.)
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fruitist says...
D88. potato texture, light orange colour.
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14th June 2011 8:53pm
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fruitist says...
I would think Durio mansoni is very cold tolerant being native to Burma.
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Mike says...
You must be looking at the MARDI site,Zappallas report or Lims overview.It is also the parent of about 10 other D's especially when crossed with D10.It still is not all that good but lives on an old reputation.It is good for a Malaysian but Thais would laugh if you tried to compare it to a Gaan yeow,montong or gumpun even picked green.Chanthaburi is the world centre of durian quality and development.
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14th June 2011 9:01pm
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fruitist says...
I kept my own notes. Haven't looked at those reports for years. I have a few of my own tabular comparisons.
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14th June 2011 9:06pm
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Mike says...
Sounds like you're a seasoned campaigner on the durian front.In Larry I lost my 2 fruiting ones and now in Larry I once again lost my 2 mature ones.I am left with 6 small ones and won't plant any more.
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14th June 2011 9:12pm
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fruitst says...
I can understand your pain. I was up there 2 motnhs after Larry. Saw the huge keeled over Durian trees in a few places like Chandlee, Sallares, etc. I have 3 ancient ones about 80 years old growing in my Borneo village.
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14th June 2011 9:20pm
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fruitist says...
Here are the 3 durian trees grown by my grandfather when he chucked the seeds out of the kitchen window in my Borneo village. The 3 trees are almost merged at the trunk level. All three have different texture and flavour.
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14th June 2011 9:26pm
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Mike says...
I thought I'd be alright so far away but wind funnelled a gap in the hills and through my backyard.Still only about 120km/hr but that was enough and it was nothing compared with 280+km/hr at Mission Beach.
I planted some and even mangosteen in Kemmerat in Ubon province near the mekong and they all died in Winter. In nearby basalt soil Chanterak they have mixed farms with them in places that get 3c in winter.Maybe you are right about pushing their limits.Asian wisdom says 15 latitude is marginal and 18 is the absolute limit for these two species.
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14th June 2011 9:31pm
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fruitist says...
No wonder you know Thailand quite well.... Have your thought of using Ombu as a wind barrier. May be it si too wet in FNQ for it.. See decription below...

Ombu - (Phytolacca dioica). Large evergreen tree of the pampas of Argentina and Uruguay. The Ombu is a large evergreen with an umbrella like canopy. It can have a girth of 40 to 50 feet and its height can reach 40 to 60 feet. It grows rapidly. Its wood is soft and spongy, soft enough to be cut with a regular pocket knife. The Ombu often has multiple trunks and is the only tree-like species for miles in the pampas. Its sap is poisonous, therefore the bush is not browsed by cattle. It is also immune to locusts and other pests. The bush is covered with dark, glossy, green leaves. It has greenish-white flowers in long clusters. These clusters droop from the weight of the crimson ripe berries. The mature fruits can be sun dried and have the taste of a grape raisin. The fruits can also be used to make liquor of exotic taste. The leaves are sometimes used locally for a brew. The Ombu's massive, fire resistant trunks contain water storage tissue, an excellent adaptation for intense grassland fires which are common in this region. Some trees have hollowed out trunks which can accommodate 13 people inside. The plant is plentiful in the pampas regions. The Ombu is also known as the "Lighthouses" of the pampas, since the "tree" provides shade for gauchos (South American cowboys) and other people that are traveling through the grassland. The wood smells like a onion and can be used as a substitute. The Ombú is of the same genus as the North American pokeweed. It is also planted in places like Southern California as a shade tree. Ombú is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, family Phytolaccaceae. The seeds are viable up to 2 years and germinate within 3 weeks. The tree can bear in 5 to 7 years. The branches are fragile to strong winds. Seedlings can die in wet soil.

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14th June 2011 9:37pm
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Mike says...
It is not too wet I get about 2500mm/yr but only have 1200m2 yard plus adjacent 400m2 or so. I have about 60 trees.I like to propagate and pass trees on.The existing 30m rainforest trees near the creek behind me were shattered with 90km gusts so cover was lost.I have no room for an Ombu and it might not do better than the existing trees.
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14th June 2011 9:54pm
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fruitist says...
Chempedak fruits.
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15th June 2011 11:44am
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Mike says...
They look like beauties.Cheena is a cross with jackfruit.I think jackfruit are a bit better.
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15th June 2011 6:07pm
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BJ says...
I'd love to find a Cheena, but its one of the many excellent fruits that are now very very hard to get. I could get seeds, but I'm always wary of growing Jak seeds in small places...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
17th June 2011 7:09pm
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fruitist says...
BJ, where can you get the Cheena seeds? What do you mena by "wary of growing jak seeds"? Are you saying that the seeds may turn out to be Jakefruit's? The hybrid has only a few arils in a fruit and most of the arils have mal-formed seeds. I ate about 10 arils with muy lunch at a top hotel restaurant in Borneo. Should have asked for some seeds in the kitchen that served the arils. See the picture. At the time, I was thinking it was not worth growing the tree as the arils are too few in a fruit, hence I didn't ask for the seeds
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17th June 2011 9:58pm
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Mike says...
I have heard they are variable with some having good yield.Seedling jackfruit are often not true to type and seedling get big.Their roots are invasive like a fig.Brian Watson near my place has productive durian trees and gave me fruits of two good quality chempadaks.He says they are good and usually true from seeds.
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17th June 2011 10:54pm
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fruitist says...
Any chance you can persuade your friendly neighbour to send some Chempedak seeds to me? Chemp is quite less cold tolerant but I like to try them here in Brisbane
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18th June 2011 10:39am
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Mike says...
he used to run the trop fruit veriety import program at Kamerunga and is a crusty character at 5km away.The two varieties were good ones with lots of flesh.I buy durian fruit off him (luang,gumpun,D99,D101 are some) and I would want to drop in unless getting durian.I can get seeds to you when durians are on.I wait for a phone call invitation.I gave 2 seedling of the best one to a friend a few eeks ago and have none left.
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18th June 2011 11:04am
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fruitist says...
I am heading your way in August. Seedlings would be nice.
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18th June 2011 11:23am
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fruitist says...
Lacoocha fruits still hanging on in late June in my garden.
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18th June 2011 11:25am
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fruitist says...
3 Poshte fruits + a dying one.
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fruitist says...
Fruits in late June in a Brisbane frontyard.
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18th June 2011 11:30am
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Mike says...
I gave my only chempadak seedlings away and can't get more seeds for a while.
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18th June 2011 11:32am
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fruitist says...
Sleeping Soursop fruitlets in late June.

20ft tall Engkala tree.
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18th June 2011 11:33am
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Jason says...
Fruitist, I've been after some seed of Poshte for about 10 years, do you thnk you could help me out with that later on :)?
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Portland
18th June 2011 11:33am
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fruitist says...
Jak flying at ground level.

7 dwarf Ambarella fruits in late June.
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18th June 2011 11:37am
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fruitist says...
A more upright Engkala tree. On its right is the purple skin Starapple which I want to put my karate chop + a flying kick to it. On its extreme left is a Rumberry (Myrciaria floribunda or Myrciaria protracta or Eugenia floribunda) and next to it (about 1.5cm from right edge) is a Kepple Apple.
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18th June 2011 11:42am
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fruitist says...
LongDong tree, all 5 ft of it. 1 more ft is below ground level.

There are other fruits still fruiting at the moment like Chinese Jujube, Cocona, etc. Trying not to show off too much.
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18th June 2011 11:55am
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fruitist says...
Jason, I will beg for the Poshte seeds for you. Will be up at FNQ in August.
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18th June 2011 12:21pm
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fruitist says...
Not a Papaw or a flying saucer, altough there is a fruit with the UFO lookalike. The post with the same 2 pictures is the Pouteria nitida fruit, still to be confirmed, may be from Jantina.
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18th June 2011 12:29pm
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Mike says...
Fruitist, I have a dwarf ambarella that is continuously fruits but has a rest sometimes.I was told the fruit I grew it from was from an ultra dwarf by the fellow who have the original fruit to me. It is 1.5m mltibranched and has a 9cm diameter trunk after 4 years and is as thick as Its progeny can flower when only months old and 25cm in the pot and have fruit straight away.
Is this normal for them and any such thing as an ultradwarf?
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18th June 2011 1:14pm
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Mike says...
Seedling lansiums have one of the longest juvenile periods.Longer than durian or mangosteen.
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18th June 2011 1:16pm
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fruitist says...
What you described for your dwarf Ambarella is my experience. They bear fruits in its second year. My tree is only 4ft tall and this cluster of fruits is its 3rd one on the tree. I have seen some in some tiny balconies in Singapore high rise. The normal tree is massive about 40 ft tall. My uncle used to grow one in Borneo.

I am aware of the long growing up period for Lansiums. Another 10 years for my trees to bear fruits.
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18th June 2011 1:32pm
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John Mc says...
My climate might be keeping my Dwarf Amberella really dwarf. It's just over two feet high and fruiting. It would not be two years old from seed.
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19th June 2011 7:15pm
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Mike says...
My original one is much more branched than that.Its progeny is 2 years old and 2 feet tall like yours but multibranched,heavier and much wider than it is tall.It had fruit only a few months after planting and under 30cm.
I had the big kind but chopped it down when 6m tall in its 4th year and it had only on e fruit.
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19th June 2011 7:37pm
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John Mc says...
What's the fruit taste like? Are they worth the space?
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20th June 2011 12:01pm
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Mike says...
They don't take up much space and taste a bit like a turpsy mango (eg haden,van dyke or other florida types).There is not that much flesh and it clings tenaceously to the seed.Asians eat them green with salt like green mangoes.It won't be a star on the backyard team but it is ok.
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20th June 2011 4:27pm
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John Mc says...
Fair enough. Mine's a long way off ripening, I hope they hang on over winter.
Oh well, they seem to be always in flower, it wouldn't take long for fruit to set when the weather warms up the other side of winter.
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20th June 2011 10:45pm
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MangosteenFarm.com says...
I have Mangosteen, Durian, Rambutan Lychee and Jack Fruit trees. http://www.mangosteenfarm.com/
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Costa Rica
21st September 2011 6:02am
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storm says...
fruits of the rainforests
0458594559
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31st October 2011 10:44pm
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Scotchmist says...
Does anyone know where I can mail order a dwarf Ambarella from in Australia? I've had no luck tracking one down.
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Scotchmist
Leongatha
18th June 2013 3:25pm
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Linton says...
Hi Scotchmist

I don't think there are any Dwarf Ambarellas available commercially in Australia. You need to find someone with a plant that's fruiting to get some seeds.

Anyway, I've tried growing them in Melbourne but they are very cold sensitive and can't survive outdoors here at this time of the year.

The fruit shops in Springvale have normal Ambarella fruits for sale at the moment but it wouldn't be worth trying to grow them. Cheers.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
19th June 2013 3:51pm
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Scotchmist says...
Ok Thanks anyway Linda..

I have an un-heated greenhouse and was thinking of attempting to grow a dwarf in there, but might have to give up on the idea if that's the case.
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LEONGATHA,3953,VIC
5th February 2014 11:31am
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