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Lemonade Fruit

    147 responses

Bob Williams starts with ...
How do you tell if the Lemonade fruit is ripe
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Bob Williams
Bray Park
18th January 2008 9:11am
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kris says...
same as lemon but lemonade fruit retains a green tinge
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18th January 2008 10:29am
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Leona says...
The beauty of lemonade fruit is that it still tastes relatively sweet when not fully ripe, unlike most other citrus. I love it, its delicious!!!
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18th January 2008 11:06am
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Julie Mays says...
My husband and I were in NZ about a year ago and discovered lemonade fruit at a Farmer's Market up in Kerikeri. Needless to say we loved them! We have not been able to find them anywhere in the US and I'm wondering if anyone knows if they have or can be grown here - or if they are exported from NZ?
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Julie Mays
California, USA
11th March 2008 5:44am
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aNON says...
You should probably ask that on an american website.
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aNON
 
11th March 2008 12:22pm
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Laura Mckay says...
Lemonade trees should be available in America, they are easy enough to grow, should do well in California. Try a local nursery/website.
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Laura2
Mt Macedon, Vic
11th March 2008 10:10pm
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Karina says...
If you do contact a nursery in America,
check that they are the same thing-they may well sell some other citrus plant as a lemonade.

Karina
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Karina
NW Sydney
12th March 2008 8:48am
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Bob Williams says...
Thank you all for your replies
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Bob Williams
Bray Park Qld
14th March 2008 5:18pm
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Nancy says...
Lemonade fruit is ripe when it comes easily off the tree. Grasp the fruit in your hand and if it feels heavy and comes away with a gentle twist, it's ripe! The fruit will also soften ever so slightly just when it's ripe. I have 2 trees and now that I'm looking after them well, I have year-round supply. Have put gyprock off cuts, 4 X 20L buckets of sheep manure twice a year, and potash on drip line for years. Very happy trees. Also occasional spray with Petroleum Oil and monthly liquid potash.
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Nancy2
Mullumbimby NSW
1st October 2008 8:47pm
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Roseann says...
went to NZ with other half at le begining of the year and was introduced to the lemonade fruit and i loved it but i live in scotland and was wondering if you know of anywhare that i can get one as i would love to start growing them
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Roseann
Scotland
13th August 2009 11:51pm
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Julie says...
I don't want to be negative, but I doubt if you can grow citrus successfully in Scotland. But you can grow lots of other plants that don't do well in warm climates - raspberries, gooseberries,greengages,Cox's Orange Pippin apples etc(sigh!)- why not stick to those?

I am of the view that if a plant is not suited to your local climate, you will have difficulty growing it. Personally, I would rther spend my time on plants that are more likely to succeed for me.



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Roleystone WA
16th August 2009 3:45pm
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Adam says...
Not sure where you could source them in the UK as they were released in Australia, rather then being a generic citrus type.

Growing citrus in Scotland would be a push, but not impossible. Some of the most famous citrus collections in Europe are in pots and are brought under cover during the winter. Personally I would would concentrate on the amazing things that do well in Scotland (lived in Edinburgh for 7 years, so I have a good idea of the fantastic quality of fruit that is grown their).
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Adam
Melbourne
16th August 2009 7:59pm
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Yukie says...
My lemonade fruit is sour as nomal lemon.
Why is that?
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Yukie
Gold Coast, QLD
11th February 2011 3:20pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Yukie,
Give it some Epsom Salts, handfull to the sq metre under the canopy spread, and water in.
Also, add 30g epsom salts, 4˝ litres water and a wetting agent, and spray the tree twice weekly for 4 weeks.
I'd give it some sulphate of potash & dolomite too.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
13th February 2011 8:14am
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Yukie says...
Thanks Brendan, I will try that.
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Yukie
Gold Coast, QLD
16th February 2011 1:05pm
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fishingcoder says...
Al's Family Farms in Fort Pierce, FL has them. I tried one last week. They are delicious.
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fishingcoder
florida
9th April 2011 1:38pm
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Peter says...
Hi,

Can anyone in Queensland (Qld) or Northern NSW help me in where I can purchase a dozen or so lemnonade fruit?

I have a car but if too far to travel then let me know cost plus postage / freight. Thanks

I also want to grow one so will need to find a nuresry that has one, any suggestions?

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane Qld
26th April 2011 11:24pm
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Peter says...
Hi,

Can anyone in Queensland (Qld) or Northern NSW help me in where I can purchase a dozen or so lemnonade fruit?

I have a car but if too far to travel then let me know cost plus postage / freight. Thanks

I also want to grow one so will need to find a nuresry that has one, any suggestions?

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane Qld
26th April 2011 11:26pm
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Rastus says...
UM! Try Daleys Fruit Tree Nursery

http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/

Cheers!
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Aust
26th April 2011 11:50pm
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Olga says...
Bunnings shops sell lemonade trees but nurseries are better, I guess.
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Olga
Brisbane
27th April 2011 11:02am
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Pauline says...
I am guessing it is the same in other states as here in SA, but bunnings get their plants from the same places as the local nurseries.
I work in a wholesale nursery, rep all over the state to independant nurseries, have access to other wholesale nurseries too, and Bunnings plants really are just as good. Sometimes better than some nurseries who don't have the same plant turn over. (and for bargain hunters like me they reduce stock much more than any other nursery I have been to. Picked up a navel orange tree in a 25cm pot for $5 the other week!)

Obviously Daleys is great too though. ;)
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Pauline
Adelaide
28th April 2011 7:11pm
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Olga says...
Pauline, I agree, Bunnings plants are good but you never know what in stock in Bunnings. Lemonade trees are always there but I was looking for Navelina last week and didn't found any.
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Olga
Brisbane
29th April 2011 3:24pm
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Peter says...
Thanks Rastus and Olga, yep I have managed to track down a lemonaide fruit tree but a dwarf type so will be growing it in a 430mm (43cm) plastic pot.

I have not come accross any lemonaide fruit itself in any good fruit and vege shops. Maybe someone has, if so , can you let me know which fruit and vege shop have you seen these in.

Obviously not Woolies or Coles as they dont cater for this fruit.

I might check Bunnings plants whilst I'm at it. never know what one can find plant wise.

Cheers, Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
4th May 2011 9:00pm
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Peter says...
If any home grower has lemonade fruit on their tree and ready to pick, would it be possible for you to sell me 4 of the fruit?

I've only planted mine in a pot, does not appear to be growing but not dead either.

The pot is transportable, does this tree need to be in full sunlight to do well or partial sunlight?

What's the best potting / soil mix to use that has worked for you and fertiliser to use?

Thanks, Peter
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Peter1
/brisbane
18th May 2011 8:15am
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Olga says...
Full sun is the best position for your lemonade tree.
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Olga
Brisbane
18th May 2011 5:15pm
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Peter says...
Thanks Olga.

I've removed all the small fruit that was on the tree.

Hopefully it will produce more and bigger fruit next year.

I've also noticed some slight yellowing on the leafs, not sure what this indicates?

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
27th May 2011 9:04pm
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Olga says...
Yellow leaves - absolutely normal in the winter time.
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Olga
Brisbane
16th June 2011 9:42am
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amanda says...
Peter - can u post a picture of the leaves? It is pretty normal in winter (as the soil gets too cold - so foliar feeding better in winter) but I just wouldn't have expected it to be that cold in Brisbane yet? It doesn;t really get cold enough here - and we are a lower latitude also...?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
16th June 2011 8:46pm
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Jason says...
Brisbane is a weird place Amanda, it's freezing cold when under 10c and unbearably hot when it's over 30c. If you listen to the locals anyway lol, they are pretty soft up there
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Jason
Portland
16th June 2011 8:49pm
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amanda says...
LOL! so true Jason :) I remember rugging up like a polar bear in Cairns when it got down to 12oC o'night! Your blood thins out too much in those northern parts! ;-)
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mid West WA
16th June 2011 8:59pm
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Chris says...
Peter, I am picking lemonade fruit right now. Sorry they aren't for sale. You'll never find them at the shops because they are not grown on a commercial basis.
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Chris
Sydney
17th June 2011 6:54pm
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BJ says...
Peter, what do you want the fruit for? I may have some left on the ground from before I gave my tree the chop. Not for eating, but e seeds might still be extracted...
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
17th June 2011 7:00pm
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John Mc says...
Peter, you'll find it'll flower sooner than you think. They don't bear annually like other citrus. They more or less flower and set fruit all year round. My tree has flowers, two different sizes of immature fruit and a couple of very ripe fruit on all at the same time.
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JohnMc1
 
17th June 2011 10:06pm
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Steve says...
Just bought one from the shop at Tropical Fruit World near Murwillumbah.

Cheap and taste excellent.

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Steve25
Gold Coast, Australia
20th June 2011 4:26pm
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Peter says...
ok Amanda, I'll post a pic of the leaf asap. yes, it does get cold in Brisbane...I'm actually between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

Had temps of 6 degrees C on couple occassions
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 8:57pm
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Peter says...
ok Amanda, I'll post a pic of the leaf asap. yes, it does get cold in Brisbane...I'm actually between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

Had temps of 6 degrees C on couple occassions
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 9:01pm
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Peter says...
G'day Steve,

Thanks for telling me, I'll be down at Tropical Fruit World next week to get some, Cheers
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 9:02pm
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Peter says...
John Mc,

Thanks mate, I'll keep an eye out but my tree is still tiny. Maybe when more sun comes out it may grow and propser.

Cheers, Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 9:04pm
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Peter says...
BJ,

Thats ok
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 9:09pm
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Peter says...
BJ,

Thats ok
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Peter1
Brisbane
25th June 2011 9:09pm
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Mike says...
I think lemonades originated in Sydney from mutant meyer lemon which in turn is an orange lemon cross.The leaf had some yellow between the veins and you can look on charts to see what the nutrient problem is with leaf symptoms.Mg or Zn deficiency in my citrus made me get some of both on and the leaves went greener.
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Cairns
25th June 2011 9:23pm
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Pauline says...
My lemonade is much harder to keep happy than my other citrus. The leaves always have some yellow somewhere or other on the plant.
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Pauline
Adelaide
26th June 2011 11:40am
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Peter says...
Thatas food for thought, having zinc and Mangesium deficiency. Might look into it. Thanks Mike
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Peter1
Brisbane
27th June 2011 9:18pm
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Mike says...
I was a bit repetitive in the paw paw stream about causes but leaf charts are excellent for diagnosis in citrus.
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Cairns
27th June 2011 9:26pm
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Peter says...
Mike,

Where can I purchase these leaf charts for citrus from? The nursery I go to dont have them and could not point me in the right direction.

Thanks, Peter
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Peter1
 
28th June 2011 8:51pm
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Mike says...
It isn't the sort of thing you need to purchase as DPI,various guides and information packages on growing citrus publish them routinely.Just google nutrient defiencies ctrus leaf symptoms and you can find what you need.The same for toxicities or pests.
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Cairns
28th June 2011 11:04pm
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Peter says...
No worries Mike.


I wonder if I should transfer my potted lemonade tree directly into the ground soil as I don't know whether potting mix per say is ideal.

I've given it citrus food and slow release fertiliser as per nursery advice...the tree is small, I have noticed very small buds developing at the ends of three branches surrounded by leaves.

Weather is still cool, maybe when it warms up it might grow more. It looks tiny though, then again its is a dwarf tree. I should have asked the nursery how old it was at the time of purchase, oh well.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
8th July 2011 9:39pm
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Mike says...
Peter it isn't severe and should be ok until it gets warmer.It could be the water and ph that isn't perfect.If you're bustin' to do something foliar feeding is ok until you plant it.
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Cairns
8th July 2011 10:51pm
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Peter says...
Mike, it's a dwarf variety. I'm not familiar with dwarf fruit tress as I dont know how tall this will grow.

Although its in a large container 430mm x 400mm, I'm not sure whether to leave it in the container or transplant it directly into soil garden.

I have noticed a cluster of tiny buds at some extremeties where leaves are, in three different locations on the tree.

Foliar feeding, what would you recommend I should apply or use?

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
10th July 2011 8:54pm
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Mike says...
Peter, lemonades are a sweet meyer lemon and very cold tolerant.Lotsa lemons is the meyer equivalent on flying dragon dwarfing rootstock.It probably won't ever exceed 1.5m and will fruit within about a year in the ground with luck.
I would keep it in the pot for about 8 more weeks considering Briz's climate and then plant.A weak (half strength) solution of any multinutrient foliar feed that continues once it is in the ground until it is booming would help.People have different opinions from mine and some people say do little and let it get advanced and warm before you plant.
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Cairns
10th July 2011 9:39pm
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J says...
Is there enough heat in victoria to make Lemonade tree lemons sweet?

I know oranges have a tough time getting sweet here in melbourne, is that the same with Lemonade lemons?
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J
upwey
11th July 2011 1:25pm
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Peter says...
Mike,
Thanks for that info, I'll keep it in the pot for another 8 weeks and see how it goes. i have amde another inspection today and noticed more buds, seem to be tiny flowers forming, on two seperate branches. I normally water it once a day, at times the potting mix becomes firm so when I notice water still sitting ontop and not draining through.

When this happens I use my hands and churn the potting mix enough to allow water to seep down. I noticed there is warmth down low, whilst cold up top. I gave the plant a bit more cirtrus plant food this arvo.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
11th July 2011 9:35pm
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Olga says...
Mike, as far as I am concerned Lemonades aren't Meyer lemons, they are different. I've got a lemonade tree and a Lots a lemons and fruits are looks different and tastes different. It seems to me that Lots a Lemons was propagated by cutting.
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Olga
Brisbane
27th July 2011 5:40am
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Jantina says...
It's true Mike, Olga is right, I have all 3 (lemonade, meyer and lotsa lemons) and they are all different. It could be the growing conditions of course, the lotsa lemons is in a pot, but the skin is paler and rougher than a meyer.
By the way J, my lemonades get sweet here and so do my oranges (they are growing on a north facing slope which probably helps) so you should be able to grow them. I have a Cara Cara which is supposed to be super sweet, fruiting for the first time so haven't tasted that one yet. Perhaps someone else has it growing and can comment.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
27th July 2011 9:13am
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Peter says...
Finally starting to see clusters of flower buds, there are about 5 clusters with about 10 to a cluster.

I don't know whether they are self pollinating or require bees, if not, then I'll use a light feather and cross pollinate on a non windy day.

Do I leave this in the pot or transfer into the ground with proper soil as opposed to potting mix?

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
29th July 2011 9:16pm
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Peter says...
Olga,

Since you're in Brisbane, would it be okay for me to come around and see how your fruit trees are?

You can pm your details.

My email is bondy99@hotmail.com

Cheers,Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
30th July 2011 8:51am
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Peter says...
Hello, is this forum still functioning as it seems very quiet
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Peter1
Brisbane
6th August 2011 7:52pm
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Peter says...
very very quiet, everyone must be asleep
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Peter1
Brisbane
15th August 2011 9:00pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Yes it must be a winter recess or something..
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TyalgumPhil
Murwillumbah
15th August 2011 9:11pm
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Jantina says...
I always enjoy your pictures Phil.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
15th August 2011 10:48pm
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Peter says...
Ok, Well bugger if I know, When I go and log in to access my account it says wrong password..however there is no link provided to allow the person to have that password sent to their addy.

Bugger if I'm going to re-register and start from scratch agsin
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Peter1
Brisbane
17th August 2011 8:26pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Just put in your e-mail address on the forum page, that usually is all you need to log on
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TyalgumPhil
Murwillumbah
18th August 2011 10:07am
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Brad says...
I don't get it. your post shows you logged in as #UserID: 5231

are you trying to link to another user/my edibles?
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Brad2
G Hill,Perth
18th August 2011 1:40pm
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Peter says...
Phil,

Yes, but when I go to this "Dear Peter Can you please tell us about your fruit trees at: My EdiblesNEW"

This takes me to another screen and up top is says login or register..When I do to log in a message is generated, your password is not correct....hmmmmm, very frustrating when there is no forgot password link.

I was trying to go into my edibles but for reasons unknown on my end I cannot enter it. Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
20th August 2011 8:56pm
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Peter says...
Brad.

No, trying to link into my own edibles but no can do so
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Peter1
Brisbane
20th August 2011 8:58pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Hey Peter I just logged in and out, maybe contact the forum moderator by e-mail, might be able to set up a new password for you mate
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TyalgumPhil
Murwillumbah
20th August 2011 9:49pm
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Peter says...
Hi Phil
I cant seem to find the Forum's Moderator email addy.

I defintely will never go onto Facebook or twitter as there is too much drama on those sites.

I only use hotmail account.

Cheers. Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
21st August 2011 7:59pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Try the website feedback option on the contact page. Correy will be able to sort it out for you in time.
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TyalgumPhil
Murwillumbah
21st August 2011 10:25pm
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Peter says...
G'day Phil,

Yes thanks, I did send an email to website feedback, it went to enquiries so dont know if it has been received or failed to go through.

Waiting to hear back from Correy.

Cheers, Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
22nd August 2011 9:42pm
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Peter says...
Still have not heard back from Correy
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Peter1
Brisbane
27th August 2011 10:45pm
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Peter says...
G'day Phil,

Correy did contact me and for some unkown reason there is no record of me of being registered, odd that hey!!!

If I was not registered then surely I would not be able to log into this forum..bugger if I know ..that's computers for you.
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Peter1
Brisbane
31st August 2011 10:00pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
Hey I think I even had a look at your "My Edibles" page as well.. I scrolled though "all users" when you were having trouble some weeks back and matched it with your ID number I think. Correy is most helpful and will generally always get back to you in time.
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TyalgumPhil
Murwillumbah
1st September 2011 5:24am
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Peter says...
No worries Phil.

I created a new "my edibles" page so it should be all good now. Thanks for your assistance. I also thanked Correy for his advice.

Cheers, Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
5th September 2011 7:54pm
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Peter says...
Question.

I had a lot of flowers on my dwarf lemonade tree but seems like majority has dropped off. The tree is in a 400mm pot with potting mix and slow release fertiliser, watered almost daily.

Leaves are green. I'm wondering whether I've over watered them or fed too much fertliser.

The dwarf is only just over 15 inches high, not asking for much am I on a tree that's 15"

Is this normal or should I transplant it directly into soil?

Thanks, Peter

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Peter1
Brisbane
17th September 2011 10:03pm
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amanda says...
Maybe it had too many flowers for a small size and small pot Peter...I usually loose half of my flowers on my citrus just because they flower so heavily - there is no way they could sustain each and every flower as a fruit...nor would I ever be able to use that much fruit!?

It's best not to give them a high nitrogen fert when in flower though...
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
17th September 2011 11:30pm
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Pauline says...
It could be that you are over watering it.
How old is it, when was it put in the pot, when was it fertilised? If it is a new tree you shouldn't let it fruit so it has a chance to develope decent roots anyway.
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Pauline
Adelaide
17th September 2011 11:32pm
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Peter says...
Hi Pauline,

I a watering it every day since I purchased and planted it. I dont kow how old the dwarf tree is but I think it is advanced. I have slow release fertilizer.

I know I've had it in the pot for at least 7 months.
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Peter1
Brisbane
22nd September 2011 2:01pm
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Peter says...
Amanda,

You are probably correct. I did speak to the nursery where I purchased it from. I was informed 400mm pot is sufficient and to renew potting mix every 3 to 6 months...I might place it in direct soil after December.

Fruit is no problem and certainly wont go to waste. Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
22nd September 2011 2:04pm
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Pauline says...
Replace the potting mix every 3-6 months??? Wth?? No, just get premium grade potting mix, and replace every couple of years. I have never heard anyone saying you should change the mix that often. Poor plant would never have a chance to settle. Just make sure it is premium grade.
My guess is that you are over watering it a bit though. You can either stick a finger in the pot and see how damp it feels. If damp, don't water. If dry do.
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Pauline
Adelaide
22nd September 2011 8:11pm
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Peter says...
Ok Pauline, will do. I'll see how it goes.
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Peter1
Brisbane
26th September 2011 9:55am
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John Mc says...
Just be careful especially when watering every day. Potting mixtures might feel dry to the touch on the surface but they hold much more water than you might realize, further down. For example, say you dunk a sponge into a bucket of water and carefully pulled it out and laid it on the bench, you will see that the sponge has not much moisture on the top but half way down the side you'll see that the sponge is fully saturated with water. That's called a perched water table, and it happens to the best of potting mixes. To reduce the perched water table effect in the pot, some add up to half course sand into the potting mix.
That's my $00.02c worth for today.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
26th September 2011 7:19pm
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Original Post was last edited: 26th September 2011 7:22pm
Peter says...
Hello John Mc

Yes, I hear what you're saying about potting mixes. That's one of the reasons why I was going to place the dwarf tree directly into soil.

Although the pot is 400mm deep, its about the same round i.e. 400mm or thereabouts. I did not place any rocks or other material in the bottom, I just filled it up with 5 in 1 potting mix with slow release fertilizer as well as citrus fruit food and two fish heads (mullet).

I've also sprayed the leaves with whiteoil to discourage any harmful bugs. Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
2nd October 2011 10:34pm
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MaryT says...
Sounds like your tree is very healthy Peter so I wouldn't worry too much. Not all the flowers will turn into fruit; some will drop off and if there are still too many you can just snap in off and keep a few. That's what I do with mine, all of them in containers as I do not have any land. If you can, of course it is best to put it in the ground––you'll have a proper tree size fruit tree, something I can only dream of.
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MaryT
Sydney
3rd October 2011 7:43am
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Peter says...
Hello Mary T,
Thanks for your confidence. The tree does look healthy and I am trying to be cautious. Thanks for your encouragement, I can relate to what you say about not having any land. I have lived in three locations and had the same problem, lucky for me, at this stage, I have some land I can play with although soil is lacking lots of fertilizer in general.

The guy who owns the place is 82 and is definitely not a gardner. He has an olive tree that has never grown fruit in 20 years. a mandarine tree that is sour as, a very small orange tree and three mango trees clumped together.

Also an apple tree that has flowered, had very small apples and either died or dropped off.

None of these trees have been fertilised or pruned in 20 years, I'm trying to make those fruit trees bear fruit and in shape. Easily said than done at this stage.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
6th October 2011 11:56pm
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MaryT says...
Keep trying, Peter. I've nursed trees like that back to health and it does not take long to see results.

First thing to do is cut off ALL dead wood, straight away the tree will respond. Give it a good watering and mulch with whatever you have. When you see new growth (and you will) you can feed it with some organic food. If they have survived 20 years of neglect they are of good stock so they will come back.

I have removed mountains of morning glory on a property once to find fruit trees underneath buried for decades and they all came back to fruit (carob, pomegranate, loquat, bananas, even a grape vine). An orange tree that had dessicated fruit on it gave good fruit for marmalade within months.
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MaryT
Sydney
7th October 2011 3:08pm
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Original Post was last edited: 7th October 2011 3:18pm
Peter says...
Hi Mary T,

Yes, I will do so but there does not seem to be any dead branches so far. All branches ars still live.

Been a very long time since I've eaten loquat as a youngster. Use to be one growing near an old canal - creek I use to walk, tasty they were. If you have any spare pomegranate I'll be happy to buy some off you. The ones in Coles and Woolies ars not the same and are sometimes old (nearing its use by date).

I'll be clearing the grass from the dripline to the base so I can apply fertiliser. Watering will have to be done by bucket for some of those trees as its too far away to reach by hose.. A good 500ft from the house.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
7th October 2011 10:42pm
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MaryT says...
I don't have access to the trees anymore since the Health Dept sold the property on which I started the Community Garden. Given to the nation by a citizen and sold to a private school. It was prime real estate; too good for people with no land of their own. :(
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MaryT
Sydney
8th October 2011 7:28am
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Peter says...
Mary T,

Sounds typical of Government and greedy developers all for the mighty dollar.

Sorry to hear you no longer have access to those trees. Private school probably altered the grounds since then too.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
8th October 2011 9:57pm
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MaryT says...
You win some, you lose some, Peter. If we were not kicked out of the community garden I would not have created this container garden on my car space at home. Back to Lemonade Tree, my dwarf lemonade is sprouting buds just weeks after arriving from Daleys. I read somewhere recently that if you remove the flowers the tree would try to flower again which defeats the purpose of saving its energy. Someone suggests that removal of small fruits should be done at 10mm size but given a chance the tree would drop most of the fruit it cannot support anyway.
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MaryT
Sydney
9th October 2011 9:10am
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Peter says...
Mary T,

Yep, I hear what you're saying.

Your lemonade tree seem to have much more leaves than my plant.

I'll take a few pics of mine and place it up here in the next few days.

My tree has a few tiny fruits left, there has been lots that have dropped off. I should have asked at the nursery as to how old the dwarf was when I purchased it at the time. Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
10th October 2011 10:07pm
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Peter says...
I'll upload pics of the new growth of my dwarf lemonade tree by Friday 9th Dcember 2011. There is some new brilliant green growing from the sides, maybe at the expense of fruit growth (I would not know, just a wild guess).

I have three very small fruit which I would have thought would have developed into a bigger size by now.

Peter
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Peter1
Brisbane
6th December 2011 10:03pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th December 2011 10:40pm
Peter1 says...
Mine is so slow growing at the moment. I'm thinking about taking it out of the pot and placing it in the groud direct
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Peter1
Brisbane
8th July 2012 11:06pm
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Lisa says...
I have a massive supply of lemonade fruit. How much do you think I could sell them for per kilo?
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Lisa16
Brisbane
9th March 2013 9:51pm
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Brendan says...
Don't forget Lisa, you can freeze the juice, it's makes a very nice drink.
I'd try $3 to $4 a dozen :-)
(I can't give mine away up here!)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
10th March 2013 8:58am
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Inahdi says...
Hi, just wondering what everyone's opinion is of the taste? I always loved the sound of the lemonade fruit but my tree died. Not long after, a friend shared a fruit from her tree and I found it very underwhelming - not overly sweet, I'd liken it to a meyer lemon. Am I just expecting too much because of the name or did my friend give me a dud fruit? I am currently basing my decision not to replace the tree on this one unfortunate tasting...
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15th March 2013 11:06am
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MaryT says...
Inahdi I just took three fruit off my lemonade tree. Though everyone said you should pick them while they're still green (just starting to pale) I found the fruit quite tart though not sour like lemon. Maybe I picked too early. I liked the way the juice pop out of their capsules; maybe that's why they call it lemonade. However, the skin did burn my lips and tip of my tongue and it was quite unpleasant. I think I will only juice them from now on.
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MaryT
Sydney
15th March 2013 12:53pm
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Brain says...
It will always be slightly sour, after all, it is a lemon cross. You can eat it straight but it's not something you'd eat in huge quantities in one sitting.

I guess some people like the taste because it's not as sour as a real lemon and it has a slight hint of sweetness. It really has unique favours.

If you wanted something sweet then I'd say, this plant is not what you are after. Maybe a mandarin instead?

Mary T, try mixing the juice with honey, it's a quite refreshing drink.
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Brain
Brisbane
15th March 2013 2:20pm
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VF says...
Hmmmm, I seem to have a different experience. I pick the fruit when it's yellow, and comes off the tree very easily (practically falls off) - the fruit is only mildly acid (not worse than an orange though), with a nice lemon cordial taste to the fruit. My daughter takes them to school as her fruit portion and loves them.
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VF
Wongawallan
16th March 2013 7:35am
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MaryT says...
VF that's good to know. What about the rind? I got burnt but perhaps if I'd waited till they're yellow they won't be so vicious?
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MaryT
Sydney
16th March 2013 8:52am
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VF says...
MaryT,I prefer to just cut the rind off as I find it a little irritant like orange peel (not too nasty though).
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VF
Wongawallan
16th March 2013 10:03am
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MaryT says...
Thanks, VF. The best thing about this forum is to read about different experiences. There is no one size fits all method. I have used Lemonade in marmalade with other citrus and the result is good.
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MaryT
Sydney
17th March 2013 7:28am
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VF says...
I'm sure the Lemonade in the marmalade was good, I think the rind would be as good as a real lemon. I've made lemon marmalade with mainly meyer lemons - too sweet for me, but it's the kids favourite, as there's almost no bitterness but a nice lemony flavour (really just a lemon jam). And you're right MaryT. The diversity of Oz climates and soils can make standardized knowledge inadequate - good to have a resource like this forum with so many gardeners from so many areas giving input about their successes and failures.
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VF
Wongawallan
17th March 2013 4:07pm
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Brain says...
VF, you have inspired me to grow a sweeter lemonade lemon. Even with sweet oranges and mandarins, it is quite easy for them to be sour. My take is my lemonade lemon never had the right nutrients and growing conditions for it to be good tasting but this can be changed. :)
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Brain
Brisbane
18th March 2013 11:07am
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VF says...
Brain, I hope you'll be pleasantly surprised. We find them very nice :) (I do fertilise and give trace elements fairly regularly.)

I should say though, I need to give regular trace elements as plant is on a steep slope, and nutrients leach out quickly with heavy rains - I wouldn't want to mislead you.
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Wongawallan
18th March 2013 4:55pm
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Original Post was last edited: 19th March 2013 7:36am
Inahdi says...
Thanks for the comments on taste. Perhaps it is worth another shot for the sake of curiosity!
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21st March 2013 5:08pm
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MaryT says...
I think it's worth it, Inahdi. Mine's only small but it's covered in fruit. The taste is distinctive.
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MaryT
Sydney
22nd March 2013 9:21am
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Peter1 says...
G'day Lisa,

If you still have any I'll buy some of you. I'm also in the Brisbane area.

My email has been provided previously on an earlier post / reply.

Cheers, Peter1
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Peter1
Brisbane
29th March 2013 10:04pm
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Maccallum says...
I too LOVE lemonade tree fruit. I have BOUGHT them frequently at South Melbourne market. , grown I think in Queensland. Looking for a source in nsw, where I sadly live,!
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Maccallum
Mosman.
30th June 2013 1:00am
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MaryT says...
They are quite productive in NSW. You can order a tree from Daleys.
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MaryT
Sydney
30th June 2013 6:35am
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Peter1 says...
I've got a dwarf variety, been growing for 3 years in a pot, had plenty of flowers and had 4 fruit first year after removing small fruit to allow growth.

Transplanted tree into garden proper, provided fertilizer, plenty of cow manure and water on occassions. It does not look like it has grown much, buggered if I know why it has not,,,could be a very very slow process in growth.. Must have had over 500 flowers, all had small fruit buds developed, then all but 3 remained on tree....few weeks later those 3 did not develop further, turned yellow and dropped off.

Anyone here that can provide me with some ideas or knowledge as to what might be the cause and how to remedy it?

Cheers, Peter1
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Peter1
Brisbane
28th September 2013 8:46am
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MaryT says...
My dwarf lemonade is also very slow compared to other citrus, even the dwarf Meyer lemon. It also attracts more pest and problems than other citrus in my garden so I don't know if the dwarfing has anything to do with it, as I suspect. One neighbour's gigantic lemonade produces massive amount of fruit though they don't look after it at all. Mine did produce a few fruit but it's not looking good right now. Mine is in a pot.
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MaryT
Sydney
28th September 2013 2:47pm
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Peter1 says...
Hi MaryT,

You do have a nice variety of fruit and herbs. I'm sure a lot of time and effort has gone into it.

Hmmm, I'm not sure about dwarf lemonade trees,it could well be the problem being a dwarf, or something else.

I'm tempted to purchase a full size lemonade tree or advanced grafted type and see if that makes a difference.

I'll have to make a spot for it in the front yard. At least I can water it by hose.
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Peter1
Brisbane
14th October 2013 11:47pm
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MaryT says...
Hi Peter 1, I have over 30 citrus and the dwarf lemonade is the only sickly one so I am not doing too badly. Of course it gets more attention than any other tree now; maybe that's why it misbehaves :) There are a couple of kumquats that are not fruiting well either but at least they look healthy. And I did have one bush lemon that died. Luckily a friend gave me some fruit so I was able to raise some seedlings. Might never see them fruit though.
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MaryT
Sydney
15th October 2013 6:36am
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Peter1 says...
Hi MaryT,

You do have a few citrus trees to look after. My dwarf tree only has 5 fruit after 3rd year growth. Very slow growth.

I'm going to invest in a larger variety and let it grow wild, I'll be preparing the soil with fertiliser and minerals before planting this time to condition the soil a bit longer.

There is a bush lemon (unless it's ornamental) growinf with large spikes, been in the ground for 10 years and been smothered by those rotten gravillia, spikey things..all pulled out and burnt. Tree never had a chance of growing, no signs of any flower either.

Cheers, Peter1
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Peter1
Brisbane
16th November 2013 1:27pm
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MaryT says...
Hi Peter1,

All my seed grown citrus are spiky and none of them had flowered or fruited yet. It makes me wonder if it was unwise to start trees from seeds but who know, one of them may surprise me one day. :)

I wonder if anyone knows how old the trees are when you buy them from the nurseries.

Amongst the 'shop bought' ones the Kessia is the only one that is spiky, I think, and it has not flowered or fruited either though the tree is a good size and looks healthy.

The lemonade has pushed out some new leaves reluctantly but it still looks sick compared to others. It has fruited before; perhaps I should have removed the fruit.

The true kumquats don't do as well as the calamondins but their fruit is so delicious I keep hoping they'll improve.

I only wish I have grounds to let them take off.

Good luck with your bush lemon. They are so worthwhile. I still get fruit from my friends so I am satisfied to wait till my seedling grows up. :)

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MaryT
Sydney
16th November 2013 4:37pm
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sternus1 says...
Lemonades are strange, temperamental beasts I find. Seems to be variation in types, I've had ones that look like small grapefruit and others that look like limes. I'm too scared to grow citrus from seed in case it doesn't come true to type.

Mary I have bought a desert lime, going to see if the seller can send me some cuttings with the tree, if he does I'll get them going and forward them on to you.

cheers
s
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sternus1
Brisbane
16th November 2013 5:19pm
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MaryT says...
Wow s; that's mighty kind of you. I've just started growing citrus from cuttings; too early to tell whether it's successful but I am hopeful.
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MaryT
Sydney
16th November 2013 6:03pm
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sternus1 says...
I was told it helps if you take citrus cuttings in the morning, something to do with the way they suck up moisture overnight and dehydrate through the day. Desert lime is different, in some way, something to do with the way it absorbs moisture....isn't the same as other citrus. Read up on it but can't remember now. Interestingly it will readily hybridize with other citrus. Could be fun.

s
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sternus1
Brisbane
16th November 2013 6:31pm
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Peter1 says...
Hello to all.

My dwarf lemonade tree has not grown much since transplanting from pot to direct soil. Over time lost most of its leaves, few flowers staring to come on again. I gave it plenty of manure, mulch and water when required.

Still has not grown as much as I'd expected it to. Trunk is thick at the base, everything else is skinny.

Time to put a tall one in.

After the amount of years gone by, with 3 fruit to show with the effort gone into it, might be time to pull it out.

Any thoughts as to why this dwarf tree is not growing or producing?

I'm in the Beenleigh area, halfway between Brisbane and the Gold Coast.

If anyone on this forum resides in Brisbane region that has a tree with a few fruit to spare, let me know and I'll buy some.

Cheers, Peter1

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Peter1
Brisbane
26th August 2014 9:22pm
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TMary says...
Picture of my lemonade this morning.
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TMary
Neutral Bay NSW
27th August 2014 8:10am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th August 2014 8:10am
MaryT1 says...
Peter1 My guess is the dwarfing rootstock. My dwarf lemonade is also dawdling. In fact I feared for its survival but it has revived after much care (what a pain). It's pushing out new growth and has flower buds on it right now. Maybe it saw the axe coming and responded with fright. I am going to take some cuttings and see if it performs better without the rootstock and if I get any fruit/seed I will propagate to see if it is the rootstock that hampers its development..
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MaryT1
Sydney
27th August 2014 8:11am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th August 2014 8:11am
JohnMc1 says...
My lemonade is also on dwarfing rootstock. It wasn't labelled as dwarf so I presumed I was buying a tree on trifolia. It has taken years (5+)to get a reasonable crop, but now I'm happy with it's production, I wouldn't want it any bigger.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
27th August 2014 9:00am
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MaryT1 says...
Thanks JohnMc1; you're right we buy a dwarf for its size but I guess we didn't figure on its lack of vigour as well. Anyway, it does look as if mine is starting to pick up, fingers crossed.
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MaryT1
Sydney
27th August 2014 9:04am
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symiot says...
My dwarf imperial mandarin also lacks growth and fruit as described by others. It's been in the ground for about 4-5 years but will persevere a little longer.
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symiot
SYDNEY,2000,NSW
27th August 2014 9:24am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th August 2014 9:23am
Brain says...
I techically have 2 lemonade trees on dwarf rootstock, one at my mothers place on ground and one in pot.

The one in ground must have been planted for a good 10 years. It is still skiny as, probably due to neglect and produce at best between 1-2 fruits a year. It is no higher than 1m but a little bit more in width.

The potted one at my place seems to show more promise, flowers a bit and at times have like 5-10 miniture fruit, though only a few gets to bigger size ( and then fruit fly or something takes them from me). Though the plant is still skinny, i'd rate it as a performer. I think if i really baby it, i can get 5 large fruit a year.

Anyway, my point is, not all flying dragon rootstock are the same, some are more vigorous than others. I have also purchased a dozen fd at one stage and the growth confirms some docs i've read. Up to 25% to 50% can be off types, and you can tell by the straighter stem.

So it is possible to have a very slow fd plant or a faster one, all depending on your luck.

For peter, can i suggest sourcing a vigorous rootstock other than trifoliata and graft your own?

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Brain
Brisbane
27th August 2014 5:48pm
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MaryT1 says...
Brain that does not sound encouraging! That skinniness you mentioned is what I don't like about my lemonade.
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MaryT1
Sydney
27th August 2014 6:54pm
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Boris Spasky says...
More disappointed flying dragon stories. You planted a dwarf tree and now complain it lacks growth. The tree can't win. FD doesn't produce full sized fruit much of the time.
Get any other rootstock. In a pot the tree size is determined by the size of the pot. The root mass cannot get any bigger than the pot! There's your dwarfing.
Why are so many afraid to get the secateurs out to trim and shape citrus? Fruit bears on terminals, so a clip encourages the tree to produce new fruiting wood. You'll get more than half a dozen useless fruit by this method.
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Boris Spasky

27th August 2014 8:54pm
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Chris says...
What rootstock then Boris, as it is hard to get anything but FD and tri?
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Chris
Sydney
27th August 2014 9:08pm
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MaryT1 says...
I had expected a dwarf to be smaller but still in proportion; not scrawny. I also expected it to flower and fruit as normal if fewer in number. Of course the one I have may be a runt that failed to thrive and not the norm.
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MaryT1
Sydney
27th August 2014 9:10pm
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JohnMc1 says...
I've had plenty of similar failures over the years Mary. Grafted Black Sapote comes to mind, I went through a number of them before I eventually chanced upon one that had some nice upward growth.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
28th August 2014 7:58am
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MaryT1 says...
You win some, you lose some - yes, JohnMc1, I am philosophical about the gap between expectation and reality :) Sometimes it's just bad luck but other times you're behind before you start because of careless selection by growers.
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MaryT1
Sydney
28th August 2014 8:22am
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Brain says...
I think lemonade lends itself to be skinny. I have limes and lemons that have branches thicken but just not lemonade. I am not too confident that pruning would help either.

Another alternative is to grow from seed. I dont know how big a seedling tree would get but a 4x4 m tree would surely produce abt 50 fruit a year.
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Brain
Brisbane
28th August 2014 10:05pm
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Peter1 says...
I read a few comments on here from others having similar experience.

Boris Spasky, mine went from pot into open ground so there is no "root bounds", so that theory you stated does not hold in my situation.

Your quote "In a pot the tree size is determined by the size of the pot. The root mass cannot get any bigger than the pot! There's your dwarfing"

Hello MaryT,
Good to hear from you, let us know what you are going to do will be successful.

I'm going to plant a full tree (advanced growth)and see if that will grow better. Got plenty of area to place one.

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Peter1
Brisbane
29th August 2014 11:04pm
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MaryT1 says...
Brain & Peter1 I think that growing from seeds is the answer to getting a more robust tree - I suspect the grafted variety came from the same stock and all carry the same weakness. Here is a good case for growing from seed. I wish I have more room.

I visited an orchard of lemonade trees in Kangaroo Valley and they all have weak branches. Although they were productive the fruit all touch the ground as the branches couldn't bear the weight.
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th August 2014 7:14am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th August 2014 7:14am
MaryT1 says...
Thanks Markmelb for that encouraging photo of the WI lime - in searching for more about the Sublime online, I came across this video (not best quality but content is good). I liked what the lady said - work hard and be prepared to learn everyday. :)

http://www.abc.net.au/local/videos/2009/09/08/2679550.htm
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th August 2014 7:53am
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Markmelb says...
Hi All - same experiences on my 7yo lemonade seedling - quite leggy and skinny even after early tip pruning - got a better crop this year of 10 to 12 some left - Included pic of Sublime showing it does finally bear well with 50+ on it - have put this down to using Troforte Citrus Fertiliser slow release with microbes - some pics for you - sorry forgot the lemonade pic before - Good Video Mary - my WI Suublime seems to get attacked more by Gall Wasp than any other Citrus I have too - Is that your eperience - i just scratch them off
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30th August 2014 8:05am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th August 2014 8:03am
Markmelb says...
Good Video Mary - I wish I had the space to grow limes trees that big but I get more than enough now for personal use - are you growing any Pomello hybrids like flicks yellow or carters red in pots? I have a first fruit on my Flicks soon to try. Luv Pomellos
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30th August 2014 8:09am
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TMary says...
Mark I only have the Nam Roi from Daley's and it is flowering right now. I am inspired by your achievements in growing tropicals. I would love to grow a pink pomelo; had the best last year in PNG.
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TMary
Neutral Bay NSW
30th August 2014 8:27am
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MaryT1 says...
Mark I'd never had gall wasps touch wood.
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th August 2014 8:31am
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Markmelb says...
Lucky you - most annoyed some idiot let them get into Melbourne - heres a pic of my tiny flicks yellow - the carters red hybrid is pink inside and mines putting out lots of flowers soon - hasnt held any fruit this last year but have to up pot it into a 500mm soon - Nam roi is a lovely large fruited specimen - hope it goes well for you - I heard of a 100 year old Pomello in Bendigo or Ballarat planted by chinese that fruits in that cold location
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30th August 2014 8:50am
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Original Post was last edited: 30th August 2014 8:50am
MaryT1 says...
Mark is the Flicks yellow a miniature pomelo? It looks so cute; love to hear how it tastes. I would have to do some serious culling if I want to fit more trees into my orchard :) I have already pre-purchased a Yuzu from Daleys and I don't have room for it. Well, maybe I do - I have two smooth sevilles (being fooled) and that's definitely too many. :)
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th August 2014 8:59am
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Markmelb says...
Mary - Flicks Yellow plant is still a baby and is supposed to be cold hardy cross between an orange and pomello i think - fruit are smaller but Ive seen twice size of mine and are sweet - let you know soon what it tastes like - waiting for it to fall in my hand ffom a light twist :)
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Markmelb
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30th August 2014 9:36am
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MaryT1 says...
Thanks, Mark - I will wait to hear your verdict.
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MaryT1
Sydney
30th August 2014 10:04am
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Markmelb says...
Mary - the verdict is by myself and friends sweet orange with a hint of Pomello and grapefruit - evryone enjoyed tasting the Flicks yellow and I highly recommend growing. attached a pic of the biggest one of about 6 or 7 this year.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
15th September 2015 1:59pm
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Brain says...
strangely, it looks very much like the sumo mandarin. either way, good work! :)

btw, anyone knows how's Mary T doing?
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Brain
Sunnybank
15th September 2015 4:43pm
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Markmelb says...
Yes - does look a bit like a Sumo - maybe Sumo is a cross between a Mandy and a Flicks? Yes also havnt heard from Mary T or Jason for a while - hope all is ok?
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
15th September 2015 5:21pm
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Peter1 says...
Anyone in Brisbane region/ area that has spare Lemonade Fruit I can get?

Only after 10.

Thanks
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Peter1
CRESTMEAD,4132,QLD
15th January 2018 6:20pm
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Fruitylicious1 says...
Hi Peter

Ask your local fruit shop to order one box for you. They might accommodate your request.

On the long term strategy, plant a lemonade tree so in the future you can easily have them at your fingertips.

Happy Gardening :-)
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Fruitylicious1
TAMWORTH,2340,NSW
17th January 2018 6:52am
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Original Post was last edited: 17th January 2018 6:52am

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