Fruit Trees
Daleys Nursery Catalogue
Welcome! Get Our 34 Page Full Colour Catalogue delivered to you
Coffee Plants In Stock and ready to buy
Coffee Plants In Stock and ready to buyWork with us 2020Choose one of these 4 plants to get 40% off
Postage Free Fruit Trees
Every Plant Ready to Send Plants In Stock
Calculate your freight online by entering your postcode after adding a plant to your shopping cart
Ask Fruit Tree Questions on the forum

 

September 2006

Video Contents: Mulberry Tree, Panama Red Passionfruit, Mango Tree, Cherry of the rio grande, Tahitian Lime, Dwarf Lemon Tree - Meyer, Loquat tree

Would you like to leave some feedback on this video?


Having trouble viewing this video?
If video is freezing, Press Pause and wait for the red bar to finish loading then press play.
OR try another video player
First: Install Google Video Player
Then: Download and watch this video     {Learn More}
Please Contact Us if you still can't view our video or you may like to read the transcript below.

Video Transcript

Hello and welcome to the first daleys fruit tree newsletter on video. The first tree we have got for you today is the mulberry tree. The mulberry is great in pies, perfect to pick straight from the tree and what I love about them is that they don't all ripen straight away. For about two to three months you can pick delicious mulberries straight from the tree.

This is the Panama Red passionfruit and it is only about 8-10 months old. They are vigorous growers especially when they are young and they produce a steady stream of red passionfruits that are nice and sweet. Passionfruits just love our warmer climates.

Mango's grow so well in Brisbane that they are often classed as a weed. But I wouldn't mind if I had a Bowen or a glen down my street. When you plant a good grafted mango tree they are going to want to flower as soon as it turns Sprint. You have to options. The first is to cut of the flower. What this is going to do is instead of putting all its energy into the fruit it is going to put its energy into the branches so that next Spring you are going to have a bigger mango tree.that is going to fruit really well and you are going to get a much bigger crop. Your second choice is to leave the flowers on the mango tree. This will mean that the mango tree will put all its energy into producing mangos. Therefore instead of growing other branches it is going to stay dwarfed and you are going to have a much smaller tree.

This is the cherry of the Rio Grande from Brazil and it loves our warmer climates. The buds on the plant are going to turn into really wonderful white ornamental flowers and within 3 weeks of these flowers forming you are going to get a deep purple cherry ready for the picking.

The Tahitian Lime is a heavy cropper with medium size fruit which goes great in cooking as it has no seeds. It is really refreshing in a drink.

Lemon trees are an Australian favourite this dwarf lemon tree using flying dragon rootstock to be dwarfed. You could keep it much smaller by growing them in bonsai bags or even pots. Lemon have a wonderful deep green foliage with spectacular flowers. If you want a steady supply of fruit all year round then the Meyer lemon is a sour beauty.

The loquat is easy to grow in Australia. They look great with golden yellow fruit. It is like eating a pear apricot and a pineapple all at once.

Click to view previous Fruit Tree Newsletters