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duriun trees: have you seen any

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John starts with ...
So what I would like to know, if any has grown, or seen a durian growing in a back yard in Queensland or NT. If its you, please give me some of your info on how you did it. This is my next challenge in life is to grow one here if possible along with some custard apples and soursops.
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John10
SB South Australia
18th January 2008 4:45pm
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Marcello says...
Hi John

We are in Northern NSW and have a duriyan tree. It seems to be going quite well and is always in fruit although I did notice that the best and biggest fruit was around in June. I also noticed many seeds at the bottom of the tree have begun to sprout. Anyway a fruit fell out of the tree a couple of weeks ago so I bought it inside and thought I might give it a couple of weeks to ripen....but then I noticed a strange smell comming from the room (sort of like sewerage) and then realised it was coming from the duriyan...apparently in some places in Asia it is illegal to take it on public transport cos of the smell. I am sure if it grown in Nth NSw you would not have any problems in Qld or Northern Territory
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Marcello
Nth NSW
19th January 2008 1:54pm
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kim says...
Hi Marcello,
I am very interested that the Durian can be grown so far south. It is my favourite fruit and I was always told that it could only grow in northern Qld and NT. Where did you get the plant and what variety is it?
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kim2
greenbank, Qld
19th January 2008 6:21pm
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John says...
hay Marcello, you shouldnt eat the durian untill it starts to smell. Thats when its ripe to eat. Remember 2 things with this fruit 1)it raises your blood preasure 2) your advised not to phisically exert yourself aftern eating it.
Can you tell me if possible where did you get the tree from. Thanks mate. how much water or rain does the tree get. How large is your tree.
Freeze the flesh and eat it all year long. I like them semi frozen, its great.
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John10
SB South Australia
19th January 2008 6:38pm
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Marcello says...
Hi All, We have only just settled on the purchase of this property (21 December) it is a five acre organic fruit farm with about 20 different varieties of fruit trees. I am told that the orignal owner planted the trees from 25 years ago and the durian (at least we were told is was a duriyan)is at least 20 feet tall. It has not been watered in the last year at least although each tree on the property is irrigated. Except of course for the numerous downpours we have had of late.
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Nth NSW
21st January 2008 1:19pm
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John says...
Hay marcello, any chance i can get some of the seeds from your durian fruit.
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John10
SB South Australia
28th January 2008 5:58pm
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Kath says...
Marcello do you have a digital camera that you can upload some photos of this durian onto this site, we would love to see some pictures of the fruit and the leaves so we can identify this tree as a durian, especially if it is self seedling it is very exciting if this is truly a durian.
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Kath
Cawongla
31st January 2008 6:46am
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Anonymous says...
Sure no problem John
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7th February 2008 3:15pm
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Anonymous says...
Hi Kath

I will try to upload some photos tonight from my computer
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7th February 2008 3:19pm
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John says...
If any of the Durian growers in the top of the NT read this how about some photos and chit chat please. Thanks John
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John10
SB South Australia
7th February 2008 5:32pm
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Marcello says...
Pics as promised!!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Marcello
Nth NSW
9th February 2008 9:58am
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John says...
thanks marcello, I would like to get my hands on some of your seeds if possible. John Ps That is a beautiful small tree, they can reach 350ft in the natural jungle and give fruit for 50 years plus.
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John10
SB South Australia
9th February 2008 10:09am
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Marcello says...
I would be happy to give you some seeds - the fruit on the tree at the moment is not quite ready - I suspect it will be ready in a month or so. Sorry I dont have a better picture but I am in Sydney at the moment and so it was lucky that I had this on my laptop. Ciao!
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Marcello
Nth NSW
9th February 2008 10:19am
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Tran says...
I think the fruit in the picture is a jackfruit not a durian.
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VIC
9th February 2008 11:07pm
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John says...
Hay tran I think you are right. I was hopping we may be able to grow one here. I am trired of buying frozen durians. I am used to having them picked fresh for me, yellow thick cream mealting down your throught.
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John10
SB South Australia
10th February 2008 9:49am
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Tran says...
Hi John,

It is most likely that you could only grow durian in NT and far North QLD because it is a very tropical fruit tree and it needs lots of heat.

I saw some fresh durian from NT sold for $30 per kilo so I just keep eating the frozen ones which is 10 times cheaper.
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Vic
10th February 2008 4:16pm
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Marcello says...
Well thanks for clearing that up Tran. Although they seem a little similar it seems that durian are very spiky. As I said earlier it has a very strong odor perhaps they are of the same family! BTW I have had jackfruit icecream and that was delicious :o)
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Marcello
Nth NSW
10th February 2008 4:53pm
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John says...
Hay marcello, jackfruit are just as nice, and when they are ripe u will frind out the truth. Jacks do smell smiliar to durians but to find out quickly which they are is quickly bring to your nose and smell it. If there is a lot of damage its durian, and if you dropped it aswell your toes would say the same.
Hay Tran, I pay 3.30kg here and eat them like a piggy. Quality fruit in indo work out to the same, very expense fruit. Bad for your health but so tasty.
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John10
SB South Australia
10th February 2008 5:22pm
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Anonymous says...
Durian & Jackfruit do NOT smell the same at all !!!
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10th February 2008 9:07pm
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John says...
No they dont smell the same but to most anglo sac's they both smell OFFF. Myself I enjoy them. I enjoy smelling them. I most of all enjoy making people smell them. hehehe
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John10
SB South Australia
11th February 2008 7:19pm
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Ian Rabig says...
I had several jackfruit trees on my old farm, and there were at least two varieties. Also some trees always tasted better than others. One tree had rounf smooth fruit not unlike soccer balls (but green) and were also good to eat.
Just eat with a fork, straight out from under the skin.
Not too green though or you get the latex taste from the sap.
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Ian4
Mackay, Qld
12th February 2008 8:29am
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John says...
Yes Ian ut thats the way I like my fruit. hehehe
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John10
SB South Australia
12th February 2008 11:10am
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Bsilver says...
John , keep taking your medication.
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Bsilver
sydney
14th February 2008 1:15pm
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michael says...
The Marang , Artocarpus odoratissimus has a very strong smell , a little like Durian but with slight pine overtones .. very tasty . I have 2 trees planted , but a long wait for fruit .
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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wet tropics
20th May 2008 12:00pm
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Tran says...
yes it is a lovely fruit. I bought two from Rusty market in Cairns in Jan but mine the segments were lots smaller than in the picture.
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VIC
20th May 2008 1:43pm
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Anonymous says...
What country is it from. I have never seen it in Indonesia. John
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20th May 2008 6:16pm
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anon says...
MORAL: never trust an identification from someone who cannot spell a fruit's name
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21st May 2008 3:06pm
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Anonymous says...
I belive its more like a jackfruit than to a durian, inside and perhaps with the smell aswell. I also believe its a native to the filopines.
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21st May 2008 6:00pm
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kim says...
I have eaten this in Sabah. There it is known as buah terap. closer to nangka and chempedak than durian.
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kim2
greenbank, Qld
21st May 2008 7:56pm
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Anonymous says...
thanks Kim. I might look for it over there next month. John
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22nd May 2008 7:35pm
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Shaun says...
I have seen whole durian fruits (I don't know whether they were defrosted or not)on display for sale in Asian grocer shops of Adelaide Chinatown, Asian grocers of Perth Northbridge & Vietnamese grocers of Girraween (WA).
Also, I saw whole durian fruits in Asian shops in Sydney Haymarket/Chinatown and in Kensington (NSW).
So, if you buy those fruits, you could plant from the seeds of the durians, although the seedlings may not be true to type like the parent fruit.

From what little I know, if a durian fruit fall/drop off a tree, then it is just ripe for eating.
That was the way things were in the past - durian growers collect the fallen fruits from the ground each dawn and cart them to sell in the morning markets ..... it was a hazzardous job as there were a fair few injuries from being hit by a falling durian fruit.
For commercial purposes these days, durians are 'pre-harvested' from the tree before they are fully ripe and artificially ripened, and such durians have less flavour or taste.
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WA/Perth
2nd July 2008 3:14pm
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Tran says...
If durian is sold for only $3.99 per kg I am sure it is a frozen one. The fresh one sometime appear and sold for $20 per kg in Melbourne.
Yes, Shaun is right, nowaday, farmers don't wait for fruits to fall off the trees anymore. I heard that too.
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Victoria
2nd July 2008 6:59pm
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Ammoh says...
In sydney fresh durian is $4 a Kg much of the time . I thought that is pretty pricey as there is a lot of waste
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3rd July 2008 1:17pm
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Larry says...
In malaysia they wait for the fruit to drop, that is why the malaysian durians are far superior in taste, whereas, the thai's pick the fruit then let it ripen. They also grow different varieties but essentially allowing them to ripen on the tree brings out the best flavours. That is also why Thai durians cost $2.99kg and malaysian durian cost from $4.99kg up to $8.99kg for the better varities. Look on the tag for the type of varieties. i personnally like the D24. Woolworths used to sell the fresh QLD varieties but now have stopped. I suspect because of lack of interest, They also did'nt taste too good. As usual in Australia they tend to only grow fruit for size and aesthetics not for taste.
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Larry
perth
3rd July 2008 2:55pm
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Frank says...
Hello Marcello. Are you still out there?
Imagine our delight to know that you got some seeds to grow! We have tried so many times to get the frozen fruits seeds to grow with no luck. We just love Durian and ask if any chance to get a few please?
We expect a few years before fruiting, mai pen rai. Thai for "no problem".
Frank and Nina


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Frank
Toowoomba
16th July 2008 6:18pm
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Frank says...
Hello Marcello again.
Any idea what variety of Durian you have please? Mon Tong may be the Thai name for the one in your picture??
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Frank
Toowoomba
16th July 2008 6:25pm
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fruitist says...
The picture posted by Marcello shows a jackfruit tree with jackfruits. it is NOT a durian tree.
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fruitist
Brisbane south
13th September 2008 2:43am
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fruitist says...
Marang as the latin name suggests does smell strongly. The best species is Keledang (A. lanceifolius), it has a superior flavour, firmer flesh and slightly larger segments than Marang. Another 2 positives over Marang or even Pedalai are it has no smell and arils are orange in colors. One orchard in FNQ is growing a small plantation.
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fruitist
Brisbane south
13th September 2008 3:32am
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trikus says...
I have planted a few Keledang and have not been able to find out much information .
Got my seedlings at Mission Beach Monster market from a girl who works at a local orchard . fruitist , you really know your stuff .. Trina tells me I should have 2 for cross pollination .. she got no fruit last year , but trees got badly damaged by larry
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Trikus
Tully
13th September 2008 7:08pm
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Anonymous says...
Hi Trikus,

I am "fruitist". I met Trina 2 years ago at her orchard which she took me for a extensive and thorough tour with total disrepect to her car. Her business partner gave me jakfruits and breadfruits. I was at Mission Beach 2 weeks ago seeing other fruitists but didn't call in to see Trina. Young Keledang needs partial shading. They like fertile alluvial soil. They are good timber tree too.

I passed through Tully back and forth from Airlie Beach to Cape Tribulation 2 weeks ago for my driving holidays.
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15th September 2008 2:08pm
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vinnie says...
my dad got a orchard full of durians. any doubt u guys can ask me and i will try my best to answer u guys back.
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29th October 2008 10:25am
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trikus says...
On a recent Rare Fruit Australia Field day here , I saw a commercial grower with hundreds of large seedling Durians . He was protected from Cyclone Larry and should have lots of fruit in the next few years .
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Trikus
Tully
2nd November 2008 6:51am
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fruitist says...
Did you ask what species or cultivars they are? I think the earliest species to bear is D. kutejensis. Saw a 12 tall tree in Cairns's Botanical Garden, labelled 050078. A few pros over others are:

Ripen 1 month later than others.
Bear in 6 years, 500 fruits per tree.
Soft spine. Easy to open.
Not causing flatulence.
Mild fragrant.
Max 25m tall. Low branching.

Cons: not strong resistant to disease and sensitive to wet conditions; small fruit.
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9th November 2008 7:23pm
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Anonymous says...
To John:throught is throat.Durians won't grow in S.A.Mealting is melting.350ft is too tall,40m is accurate.Durian not Duriun.
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health101orgarticles1
Sydney
21st December 2008 8:30pm
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Anonymous says...
To Frank:i know what your talking about,and i feel your pain.I have brought Durian`s plenty of time`s from some Malaysian Fruit and Meat Market`s out in Orange County and i`ve also bought a pretty good amount of Fresh Jackfruit,and i`ve cariously have tryed to cultivate both of them from seed`s,but the thing is i alway`s seem to run into the Durian`s being sold whole and fresh but alway`s "Frozen",i just thought i`d send you a reply,because we seem to both have so far a similar experience when it come`s to the Durian`s in our life lol...this also made me come to a possible conclussion,maybe the reason or one of the reason`s first of all why Durian`s are usually sold frozen v.s. most other fruit`s sold is because the way the fruit is put together,for Durians have a tuff prickly pill/but the inside of the Tropical-Fruit atleast ofcourse when ripe is soft,silky and mushy so if they kept them out in warm room temperature air for too long,since the inside of the Durian is mushy the fruit my guess is would start to deteriorate quite quickly.So i thank the main reason Durians are usually sold frozen is so they hold better and stay fresh until they get sold.But if im not mistaken when i first started buying Durians they i think sometimes did sale the not frozen ones,but that was a few years ago now out here,and even where i use to buy them they dont seem to sale fresh Durians unless they`re frozen.I`ve also tryed to sprout seeds of frozen Durian and had no luck so far.I think Durian seeds which come from frozen Durians are more difficult to germinate,because once the whole Entire fruit freezes ofcourse the seeds to then freeze i think it makes the seeds less viable.It also depends on i think what kind of soil you`re trying to cultivate your seeds in also where you live where your trying to grow the seeds.Im not going to give up yet myself,because i know somewhere some how some Markets sale fresh whole unfrozen Durians.Frank #1 Durians are a very Tropical Fruit,i also herd that they thrive in very rich,well drained soil.As long as you live in a Tropical Place,and probably have some seeds that havent been in a Durian that hasnt been frozen and plant the seeds in a nutrient rich well draining soil they should be able to eventually start growing.I guess im going to see first off if i could buy a Durian that hasnt been frozen,so i could try growing Durian from seed again myself.On the other hand every Jackfruit that i have bought and took seeds from and planted them so far i`ve been very successful in the Jackfruit seed sprouting department.I`ve had Jackfruit seedlings that have reached a foot high in less than a month.It could be that maybey Jackfruit are just easier never could be too sure of anything.But thinks Frank its been nice sharing your concern.
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Mame1
Kern County
25th December 2008 1:22pm
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RolFlor a says...
To Kern County Anon. : FROZEN DURIAN : It is frozen so as to kill imported insect pests.
UNFROZEN DURIAN : It was probably just thawed out by the shop after being originally frozen.
"I herd your cariously say thinks you,do you thank conclussion?"
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie Loser Heights ' , Sydney
30th December 2008 11:24am
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Jodie Barr says...
Can buy defrosted durian from Woolies these days, But in the north Qld(Cairns) can buy fresh australian produce.
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Jodie Barr
Australia
9th January 2009 10:06pm
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May says...
Hi Megan,

Wow, look at those durians! I am drooling already. Which part of Australia are those durians grown?

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May
Melbourne
14th February 2009 7:51pm
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Steven says...
Hi to all fellow fruities. A strong and healthy Durian tree grown anywhere out of say 12-16deg max latitude from the equator would be the Holy Grail of any gardener in my opinion! But it would be a hard ask as the tree won't tolerate even a scratch of frost,needs high humidity and a latitude of abt 0-10deg from equator. I have dreams of building a massive tropical Biosphere where all strange and wonderful fruit can be grown...who wants to join me!?!
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Steven4
Sydney
15th February 2009 8:31pm
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Jantina says...
Hold on to that dream Steven, personally I'm creating my own dream of healthy fruiting subtropicals in this coolish climate, so far so good!
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
16th February 2009 10:01am
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Steven says...
New discovery during a drive in Burwood,Sydney,NSW...massive healthy Lychee trees full of fruit, I also observed some large citrus looking trees, large dark green Wampee looking leaves but with large singular fruit...unable to identify as yet.

What types of fruit tree do you Southern folk manage to grow in Mt. Gambier S.A.?

What strategies are you employing to guard against cold/frost?



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Steven4
Sydney
21st February 2009 11:22am
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HappyEarth says...
Its great to here Steven that Lychees are fruiting so well in Sydney! Im not surprised ... I saw some commercial lychee orchards inland from coffs which has a fairly similar climate to Sydney's coastal plain. My two lychees (wai chee and bosworth 3) have been in the gorund for about 15 months now and are looking pretty good :)

Ohhh ... count me in on the tropcial biosphere idea!

Rich
www.happyearth.com.au
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Wollongong
1st March 2009 6:20am
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Michael says...
Here's a picture of Jackfruits growing in surburbian Sydney ( Cabramatta ) .The pictures were taken from my mobile so it's not too clear. These were taken one week ago while I was driving around the suburbs .I was so amazed to see Jackfruits growing in my area that I had to stop and take this picture. The house had 4 jackfruit trees with fruits on two at the moment .What a site to see!
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Michael
Wakeley
15th June 2009 10:50pm
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Duro says...
Whats up John its me.Im the one that said i felt your pain last time about the trying to sprout Durian seeds from a frozen Durian/well guess what theres hope because i found a Vietnamese market in Garden Grove Cali where they sale fresh Durian fruit that arent frozen i bought two of them and they sale their fresh ones there for 4.50l/b so there you save fifty cent a lb since most places sale them for usually 5.00 a lb/id say both of the fresh Durians that i bought there where almost about eight lbs a piece the next day i took them home and planted five seeds from both of the durians alone in these cut up and taped garbage bag pots that i made for them so that they`d be like polythame bags each bag i made about two foot deep and a foot wide i filled them with a rich organic potting soil its loose spongy like soil that is like compost because its organic/i planted each seed in its own black garbage baggy about an inch deep about five days later i noticed cracks in one them then i waited about eight days later then i doug up only the top soil in that bag covering that sprouting seed without completely digging it up and i noyiced a big whitish brown taproot growing out of that seed so then i quickly put the soil back over it then doug up the top soil in the other four baggies in which i planted the other four seeds in and i noticed the others had huge taproot sprouts growing out of them aswell every since then the dirt in all five of them has been still pushing up so they seem to be growing pretty vigorously so you can do the same John you just have to get fresh Durians that arent frozen.Thanks Brett
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Mame1
California
19th June 2009 5:47am
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maria says...
I would love to know where I can get some Marang seeds online?
Thank you
Maria
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maria3
india
20th June 2009 6:07pm
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trikus says...
Very short viability with seeds of Marang .. you should try and source some locally . Season is short , I ate one 2 months ago and saved all the seeds , they are now 10 cm plants .
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Trikus
Tully
20th June 2009 8:06pm
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maria says...
Could someone tell me me where I could order seeds of fruits of South East Asian regions...like pedalai,marang, dragon fruit etc.?
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maria3
india
21st June 2009 12:29pm
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Big Kev says...
Marcello, sorry to disappoint you but it looks like a jakfruit tree to me, durian fruit have long sharp points on shell, cannot see that on your photo.
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kevin Whitten
sarina qld.
17th August 2009 10:01pm
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Steven says...
Congratulations on sprouting Durian seeds. The potential trees you may enjoy will now require the humidity & temps for the trees to survive & fruit. In my knowledge, you should now aim for a climate zone very similar to those found between 0 deg & 10-12 deg off the equator. The conditions in the plastic bags with the seed sprouts shld be a good indicator. You seem to have the soil condition correct. I am so happy for you on this acheivement. Pls keep the gardening community here informed of your progress.
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NSW
23rd August 2009 11:19pm
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mayaragulam says...
No big kev thats durian, certain. Leaves like durian, fruit is durian.
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UncleFugu
 
26th August 2009 5:45pm
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DUR IAN says...
To mayaragulam and Marcello:
Your photo shows a Jakfruit fruit,a Jakfruit tree trunk and a Jakfruit leaf.
It is DEFINITELY NOT a Durian fruit,leaf and tree.
YOU WON'T WANT TO PUT YOUR CHEEK (FACIAL CHEEK AND BUM CHEEK) UP AGAINST A SPIKY THORNY DURIAN FRUIT.
http://www.daleysfruit.com.fau/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/#4137

BIG KEV: YOU ARE RIGHT,DEFINITELY.
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27th August 2009 10:07am
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Dur Ian says...
TO FRUITIST AND TRIKUS:
.......................HERE IS AN IMAGE OF SOME TEXT INFORMATION ON 'KELEDANG'.
.......................................
TO FRUITIST:YOU MISTAKENLY GIVE THE BOTANICAL NAME AS A.LANCEIFOLIUS AT YOUR POST HERE : https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/#10092
THE CORRECT BOTANICAL NAME IS ACTUALLY A.ANISOPHYLLUS.


ALSO IT IS SPELT AS KELIDANG.
IT IS ALSO KNOWN PRIMARILY AS ENTAWAK.
OTHER COMMON NAMES FOR IT ARE CORRECTLY SPELT AS:
KELIDANG,TAWAK,BINTAU AND BINTAWAK.

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27th August 2009 11:37am
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tr says...
Dur Ian , very small image you posted looks like a scan from the very old Tankard book .. What makes you think that info is correct ? .. The most recent Rare Fruit Review has A.lanceifolius as name . Seeds were imported by Peter Saleras' brother , Peter is a mate and one of the sole source of this plant in Australia . Info in Tankard came from another local David Chandlee and has now been corrected . Entawak may be name for timber harvested from tree .. and with many common names , its always best to stick to correct nomenclature .
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peter12
 
27th August 2009 8:32pm
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DUR IAN says...
TO KIM:
...........THAT ABOVE PHOTO/IMAGE OF THE 'MARANG' IS NOT CALLED 'BUAH TERAP' http://daleysfruit.com.au/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/?PHPSESSID=5502b12da9237a93b1cbd42cc672e00b#7743 .
'BUAH TERAP' IS A DIFFERENT SPECIES OF FRUIT PRIMARILY CALLED 'TEKALONG'.
IT IS ALSO CALLED TERAP,TOGOP,BENDA,AHBAT,JERAMI,MENDI AND HO.
TERAP IS A MORE ROUNDED FRUIT THAN THE MORE OVAL SHAPED MARANG.
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27th August 2009 10:17pm
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Anonomous says...
Hi John its me again.I have two durian seedlings at home doing very well so far.I also found this place on line called Exotic fruit market that well ship a whole Fresh Durian to you,but theyre a little expensive,they get durians over 10lbs sometimes the runner of the companies name is Anshu to place an order,the website is WWW.ExoticFruitMarket.Com and the company has theyre phone number posted on the home page.Or Sales@1-800-Exoticfruitofthemonthclub.com,I should have more seedlings soon,i placed a special order for a Durian weighing 20lbs,Anshu said call back on the second for the huge durian i ordered,i didnt know a durian could reach 20lbs!!!.John try them,it might be your best bet,theres are probably of Larger size and of better quality than ones youd buy in a Market anyway...thanks
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Mame1
Ca
28th August 2009 5:56am
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Dur Ian says...
TO 'TR',AND OTHERS :
.
HERE IS A BIGGER IMAGE SIZE OF THE ENTAWAK TEXT.
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30th August 2009 11:45am
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trikus says...
Will ask Peter about this , but foliage on mature Keledang is not lobed much at all . Young trees have some . Fruit matches description but could be a related species.
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Trikus
Tully
30th August 2009 9:57pm
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mayaragulam says...
It is a durian! I know it is a durian, i have seen and eaten this fruit and tree my whole life.

Perhaps we are talking about different pictures, this tree next to the white fence in Sydney in photo by Michael is a jak, the other one in the photo done by Megan is a durian.

Below is in order from left to right: jak leaves (1), jak fruit (2), durian leaves (3), durian fruit (4). from Google images.
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UncleFugu
 
6th September 2009 10:22am
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Original Post was last edited: 6th September 2009 10:29am
DUR IAN says...
TO MAYARAGULAM :
.
YOU MADE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU WRONGLY ACCUSED 'BIG KEV' OF BEING WRONG IN HIS POST HERE : http://daleysfruit.com.au/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/#28263
.
'BIG KEV' WAS RIGHT WHEN HE SAID THAT 'MARCELLO'S'PHOTO WAS OF A JAKFRUIT AND NOT A DURIAN.
.
SO,'MAYARAGULAM',HOW DID YOU MAKE YOUR INCORRECT CRITICISM?
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6th September 2009 3:47pm
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Big Kev says...
To DUR IAN, thanks for the back-up.Some people take some convincing.
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kevin Whitten
sarina qld.
6th September 2009 4:27pm
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Chris says...
Man.. this discussion really turned to crap LOL. Noone really cares.

Anyhow, who knows of good places to buy Durians in Sydney?
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Sydney
14th October 2009 10:20pm
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Ellen says...
hehehe Chris

we are all here to learn, and to improve our knowledge of the precious gifts that God blesses us with, food/fruits production.

No need for criticisms, time is too short to waste on silly things.

You wants durian? Go to Cabramatta CBD, those asian shops got plenty, all year round.
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Ellen
Smithfield
15th October 2009 7:57am
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Anonomous says...
Hi Steve,and thanks for the congrads on my sprouting the Durian seeds ive sprouted.Well i have two seedlings that survived from the five that i planted in the home-aide pollytheim bags and one is about two ft tall and the other about a foot tall in there bags but the leaves are turning brown and shrivaling up/so recently i went to this Ranch_99Market in Rowland Heights Cali/and bought these three whopper 10lb durians that they had waiting for me at the market for a few days they werent even totally ripe,but i waited for three extra days to see if they would start to split because they say a Durian begains to split at the bottom of the fruit when it is really getting ready enough for eating and the smell gets stronger.I opened the three Big Durians on the night of the third day being inpacient and i got five huge good fat seeds out of the three durians/you think theird be more seeds collected from three Large Durians/but most of the other seeds accidently got destroyed by being cut into while cutting open the Durians it probably wouldve helped if i wouldve waited until the Durians where more ripe because they wouldve started opening themselves but out of all five of the good seeds that i kepted for planting in planted the three largest seeds out of those in cut pop-bottles and put them on top of a heater that i have and now i have one huge massive sprout coming out of one that is brown/and greenish/and another that has just began to show through the soil.These new Durian sprouts that im growing look like theyre going to do much better than my first ones/because for one these sprouts from these Durian seeds are larger and look more promising they are also growing more vigorously and robustly its probably the heat from the heater/plus im using a glass aquarium with a greenish blue plastic shower curtain covering the inside walls of the aquarium for filtered sunlight like a mini greenhouse to put them in in the daytime when the sun lights up the inside at night when it gets cool i put them back on the heater for warmth/because it is winter almost and ass Tropical a fruit as Durian is i dont think cold would workout to well for them,especially at this young vulnerable stage.Thanks Steve ill try my best to keep everyone posted on my new arrival Durian seedlings progress/i will even try to post some pictures of the two once theyve grown a little larger.
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Mame1
California
11th December 2009 6:38pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th December 2009 6:43pm
trikus says...
Looks like a great Durian season this year , just saw many small fruits on large trees locally . Also good set on Keladang , and several other Artocarpus.
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Trikus
Tully
1st January 2010 10:13am
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amanda says...
Hi trikus - I have noticed that it's a great flowering season for subtropicals too (even over here) I have an Artocarpus (Kwai Muk) on the go here - but it's not very vigorous - do you know much about them?
I was wondering if they have any particular demands (water, shade, shelter etc)? My other subtropicals are doing well. Is it maybe not warm/humid enough here?

PS - my african prides have been flowering prolifically since June!!??
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
1st January 2010 12:17pm
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trikus says...
Amanda , Kwai Muk should do very well for you , may take a few years to get established , and may benefit from another tree for cross pollination . I have another in the back yard and gave one to next door .
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Trikus
Tully
1st January 2010 2:50pm
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amanda says...
Thanks trikus - I will get it a girlfriend! :-))
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
1st January 2010 6:34pm
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Rev says...
I have a pot of Durian seedlings
looking very healthy
in Townsville

i collected teh seed in bali at 800m altitude
hoping the higher you go the tougher they are

Bali trees are seedlings, but seem pretty uniform

I know people have them at innisfail
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Rev
Townsville
7th May 2010 7:19pm
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Rev says...
Im planning to insert some into the creek line rainforest at JCU townsville and Cairns campus

the bali growers said '7 years' to fruit
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Rev
Townsville
7th May 2010 7:20pm
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Rev says...
Durian seeds are ok too
like chestnuts after boiling
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Rev
Townsville
7th May 2010 7:21pm
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Victor Chong says...
Please contact me and we can have a discussion, I am a Malaysian chinese and I only grow exotic tropical fruit trees at my home. I have quite a selection of fruiting trees at the moment. I like to share and obtain useful growing tips , Cheers , hearing from you Vinnie
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Asian Pandan Plants
Sydney Hunter Valley Region
28th June 2010 2:08pm
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Michael says...
Hi Victor,

Do you have a my edibles page ?
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Michael
Wakeley
28th June 2010 5:11pm
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Rev says...
ive split my seedlings and 2 look unwell
just going to nurse them back if i can

i tried some durian from innisfail
honestly what you buy here for top $
is about $2 in Bali at a roadside stall

i think maybe people are kidding themselves with whats planted here
might as well go on holiday and pig out in asia, than support overpriced crud here.
I like the idea of growing here, but give us 20 years of research!
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Rev
north qld
30th June 2010 3:23am
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trikus says...
Rev , there are many plantings of select grafted material , but most fruit is eaten by growers and friends , I KNOW MMMMMMMM.
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Trikus
Tully
30th June 2010 8:29am
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Stephen J says...
I am heading to north qld next week.
Can someone tell me where can I buy durian from??


Thanks

stephenjoseph@yahoo.com
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Stephen J
Qld, Bowen
25th July 2010 10:41am
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trikus says...
None around now , fruit is usually only available during warmer weather.
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Trikus
Tully
25th July 2010 5:17pm
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abkaisure says...
Hi john, Australia weather is definitely suitable for durian growing. We have imported many durian seeds to Australia NSW. There are many named durian cultivar here in my area spore. You'll like to check my collection on eBay ID: abkaisure
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abkaisure1
spore
31st October 2010 8:20am
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au0rey says...
I am also from Singapore but living in Melbourne. I used to have durian trees growing in the backyard when I was small. They grow into huge trees! And yes, I miss them so much, one of my favourite fruits, and yes they smell and in Singapore, you cant have them in the trains! However, I dont think they can be grown in cold places such as Victoria...they are tropical trees arent they??

Somebody mentioned about jackfruit in this thread...just to add, the seeds of jackfruit are edible...just boil them and eat them..they taste much like chestnuts...very nice! So dont throw them out.
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Melbourne
1st November 2010 8:58pm
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abkaisure says...
Hi Auorey, yes these durian genus has evolve into many delicious and new flavor since :) yes jackfruit seeds could be eaten when boil with water, also for other medicinal usage. Try to grow these fruits in Australia today visit us at

http://stores.ebay.com/Tropical-Marvel
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abkaisure1
spore
8th November 2010 3:33pm
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abkaisure says...
Hi trikus, they are still available in my region visit us for more info

http://stores.ebay.com/Tropical-Marvel
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abkaisure1
spore
8th November 2010 3:34pm
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ictor says...
Sorry no Michael, contact me directly on my email chongsenseis@yahoo.com.au for further discussions ! Cheers Michael, Put ref; Fruit trees
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9th November 2010 2:28pm
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abkaisure says...
Hi Michael, you looking for something? Maybe we can oblige to your need. We have a wider and fresher range of fruits than Malaya

Cheers
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abkaisure1
spore
10th November 2010 8:27am
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Rose says...
Hi Rev,

I am very impressed by the variety of fruit and nut trees you can grow in Townsville, especially stone fruit and blood orange, oliver and chestnut. I was told they are not likely to fruit here. Would it be possible to visit your garden as we are keen to grow all those things ourself? I could be reached on rose_rapson@health.qld.gov.au or 47962886 (work)


Cheers,

Rose

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Rose2
Townsville
25th November 2010 12:08pm
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fruitist says...
Some Asian grocery stores are selling the Musang King ("Cat Mountain King") Durians imported from Malaysia. It is the best and most expensive Durian in Malaysia. Here, at $11.99, it is 4 times dearer than the Golden Pillow from Tailand.
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5th December 2010 1:47pm
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Alex says...
I'm planning to have a durian party, with satay, rojak etc etc.

Does anyone know where I can get malaysian durian in Sydney, Australia and during what time of the year?

thanks
Alex
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Alex
Sydney
13th January 2011 5:31pm
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Original Post was last edited: 13th January 2011 5:32pm
amanda says...
A Durian party? Is that one where u can leave your shoes at the door at last.. :))
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
15th January 2011 12:52am
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Alex says...
If only! With my wife (a durian hater!) I dont think you'll even get into the door! I was planning on having it in the park next door.
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Alex
Sydney
18th January 2011 4:36pm
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Hayden says...
Hi alex,
Bateau bay woolworths have durian now for $6 a kilo.
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Bateau bay nsw
22nd January 2011 3:06pm
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RichardSDA says...
Hello if you are anywhere near Morayfield there are some huge trees with lots of fruit that hang so low to the ground it's amazing to see, on Oakly Flat Rd Morayfield maybe number 10 or there abouts, just befor Morayfield Rd. He often sells them very cheap :)
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RichardSDA
Narangba North Brisbane
14th February 2011 11:41am
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Original Post was last edited: 14th February 2011 11:47am
fruitist says...
Are you sure it is Durian? I tried to zoom in with my private satellite to get a close up of the road but couldn't see any Durian trees there.
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14th February 2011 11:47am
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RichardSDA says...
Sorry from what I read it is Jack fruit, I can see the tree from google maps its an orange house to the left maybe number 20 try that with you big Satalite and tell me if you can see it :)
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RichardSDA
Narangba North Brisbane
14th February 2011 11:52am
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fruitist says...
Sorry, I don't use Google Map but another one.
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14th February 2011 11:56am
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RichardSDA says...
mmm please share it please please :) did you see it anyway?
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RichardSDA
Narangba North Brisbane
14th February 2011 3:04pm
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fruitist says...
Sorry, not too interested in Jackfruit trees. Too common in Brisbane.
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14th February 2011 4:52pm
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Jo says...
To https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/#51491
Yeah,I know where in Sydney to get the frozen whole Malaysian Durian.
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17th February 2011 12:18pm
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Alex says...
Hi Jo, WHERE?

My Brother in Law tells me that they are getting excellent durian in SIngapore now and it is quite plentiful and inexpensive. So I guess this is one of the many times in the year you can get durian.

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Alex
Sydney
18th February 2011 9:55am
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Jo says...
http://www.rockman.com.au/store-locator/?product=durian&search=Search
2 Malay varieties.

The malaysian durian is probably selling in Sydney for about $13kg, meaning about $40kg for the edible flesh.
Very small whole fruit.

I also saw an unusual Thailand variety this week.
The Chanee variety was seen amongst the usual Monthong durian variety.
The Chanee probably is imported as mixed with Monthong in the same 13 kg boxes.
The Chanee have greener skins and are a slightly different shape, and are labelled as Chanee, and sold for the usual $4kg.

Will you post your experiences with finding, and eating, the Malay durian in Sydney?
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9th March 2011 7:01pm
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Jo says...
This is the link for the WHOLE durian, not the '(box)'/500gram packets.
http://www.rockman.com.au/store-locator/?productcode=E1DM-DMK&search=Search
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9th March 2011 7:21pm
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Mike says...
Wow there is alot of confusion about durian and many above are confused with artocarpus like marang,jacks and chempadak.Durio zibethinus is the real deal, forget the minor ones in Borneo,Sumatra and nearby. Malaysia flogged their good ones from Thailand and gave them D series numbers but D24 is Malasian as is Red Prawn (D175) and D197.Montong,Gaan yeow,Penangs like Red Prawn are best.Maybe the Chantaburi series and Laplaes are better.FNQ is too cold and dry for many.Red Prawn has the best cold tolerance of those we have and even Ingham is suitable.If we get Long Laplae and Lin Laplae from near Utteradit then Mackay or further south is a prospect.The story of durians is a long and complex tale.
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Cairns
12th June 2011 10:17pm
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Jo says...
Wow.
Mike, you are a Durian expert.
How many years/decades have you been aware of Durian?
I haven't heard of 'Laplae'.
I haven't heard of the 'Chantaburi series' either.
Any good links or more info on those 2 unknowns?
Are you a Durian grower/farmer/hobby farmer?

Would you agree that Chempedak is maybe even more honey-sweet than Durian, even the best Malaysian Durian varieties?
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15th June 2011 4:55pm
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Jo says...
Hey Mike.
What do you think about 'Abkaisure', above, selling Durian varieties, eg Monthong, D24, etc?
But he is selling only the seeds.
Wouldn't seeds not grow into the 'parent' variety because seeds don't grow into the same as the parent?
He would have to sell grafted varieties wouldn't he?
His seeds are priced at from about $13 each.
It looks like a con for the uninformed.
Agree?

This is his Singapore based Ebay business:
http://stores.ebay.com/Tropical-Marvel/DURIAN-Genus-/_i.html?_fsub=2282291015&_sid=703655665&_trksid=p4634.c0.m322
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15th June 2011 5:15pm
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fruitist says...
Mike, I thought your taste bud likes drier fruits as evidenced by your preference for crispy jakefruit over sloopy jakefruit. Have you eaten a Musan King before? If you like drier texture and one that doesn't stick to your throat then you would like Musan King. There are a few grades of Musang King: grade 2 is what is commonly available, Grade 1 is rare and then the supreme Rajah. I ate one which costed $150 per fruit in Singapore. A rich friend saved the fruit in freezer. Unfortunately only 1 aril left for me and it was frozen.

Can you describe the taste and texture of those Thai good durians as mentioned by you. Are their pulp like Monthong? There are plenty of Monthong-like in Malaysia.

I like all kinds of durians from sloopy to chewy ones. Malaysia has a wide range of the pulp texture and flavour.
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Mike says...
If you google lin or long laplae and chanthaburi 1 and 2 there should be something.I;ll try to dig up some references that I have printed out a while ago.Laplae is the village near Utteraditt famous for langsat.Chanthaburis were initially bred to have no smell through a remarkable and successful program.
I am Mike Trenerry really and a 'biologist' and former photographer but now a public servant.Trying to rescue the durian and other irreplaceable trees at DPI kamerunga Quarantine in 1994/5 sparked my interest but the story goes back further and I won't bore you.
I just have a crammed yard know, people and took an interest.
Seedlings are barely worth it especially highly derived ones and mostly not true to type.Chanee and montong are whole classes of durians not just stable identical formas and chanee is almost as good as montong.
Singapore has only a few of their own trees and import lots.
Anyone who tries Amber and the best crunchy orange fleshed jacks will suddenly get interested.
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Cairns
15th June 2011 5:46pm
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fruitist says...
Even Stanly Ho likes it.

http://starbucks87dude.blogspot.com/2011/06/im-craving-for-mao-sang-wong-musang.html
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15th June 2011 5:49pm
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Mike says...
Montong are D158 I think and the malaysian ones are infused with thais especially montong,gumpun,luang and that style except maybe Penang but thais are not as fussed on malaysian or indonesian durian.They value different qualities and there is enormous variation. i like some dry ones as well.
I haven't had Musan and I suspect Rajah is D197.The D24 X D10 series that produced MDUR88(D190),MDUR88 and MDur79 are supposed to be excellent and I haven't even tried them.
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fruitist says...
I am going to KL and Borneo next January. Singapore and Borneo an dmay be Bangkok next April. The Malaya durian season starts in May. Borneo season starts in November. I like to do a do a durian tour in Malaya. What season in Thailand? Singapore imports the best from Malaysia and Thailand.
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Mike says...
Thai main season is from April to September but always a few out of season.I don't know when the big competition is in Penang.In some of the good markets in bangkok you'll see the fancy seedless guavas,excellent varieties of wax apples(S.samarangense),good sala and a host of what would be excellent acquisitions.
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15th June 2011 6:24pm
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fruitist says...
Monthong is D159 aka Golden Pillow. D197 is Musan King but there are a few grade of D197. Any new development by the Zap brothers? Some dried ones are really chewy and thin. They ripen around mid year during the dry months. The Isu has very good dry (not too moist, not too dry) texture with very thick pulp.
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15th June 2011 6:29pm
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Mike says...
Chanee means gibbon,kradum means button and gaan yeow means long stalk. Alan Zapalla apparently has lost interest after repeated cyclones.He no longer sells grafted ones but lots of flowers.
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Cairns
15th June 2011 6:34pm
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Mike says...
One of the borneo durians maybe D.oxleyanus has been crossed with zibethinus and there are 3 named types of them in Borneo.
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fruitist says...
Is Sala = Salak? Next April is my school reunion time. Some suggestion is to go by cruise to Thailand after 3 days of feasting in Kuching. But there is another tour to Greece and Turkey which starts from Easter Monday at Singapore organized by other friends.

In Thailand, Chanee is used as a root stock for early fruiting. But in India Cullenia excelsa is used instead.

In Penang, the best place is Balik Pulau town on the southwest corner of the island.


There are all-you-can-eat tours in Malaya touring durian orchards.
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15th June 2011 6:39pm
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fruitist says...
The buches of durians I showed on the other thread is Isu which can be D. oblongus or D. oxylenus. Very confusing. See my notes below.

Isu (Durio isu or Durio oblongus) - Native to Borneo. Medium sized (5-6") fruit, with a yellowish-green skin, many long sharp spines, and yellow flesh. Flesh is thicker and firmer than most durians. Minimal smell. Pollinated by spiderhunters (Nectariniidae) not bats.


Kerantongan (Durio oxleyanus) Also called Keratogan. Malays calls it Durian Burung. Iban calls it Rian Isu. Native to Borneo. Small fruited, wild durian of Borneo. Grows to 40m tall. Immature fruits are bright green with a hairy appearance of 4cm long curved spines ripens to yellow color with strong odor. The globular fruits are extremely homogenous. Occasionally cultivated in Borneo. The aril is usually yellow, smooth and sweet with a strong distinct smoky fragrance. Large tree, often larger than the common durian. Unlike most other durians which have five main lobes, the Kerantongan has only four. Easily opened. Some thin pulped. Propagation by seed.


Kerry Mc brought some seeds back a few years ago.
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fruitist says...
Have you checked out the "sepangu" cultivar. I think it may be a Zap's invention.
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15th June 2011 6:52pm
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Mike says...
Salacca wallichiana (syn S.rumphii) is known as Rakum,Sakum and Sala depending on the degree of domestication.Sala are sweeter with more flesh and on a smaller palm.Sala sane and sala moh were two of the first with sala noen wong only 2.5m and the best sala sumalee the same size palm. If you get seed the 3 loculed fruit have a higher proportion of females.They're grown vegetatively once you get them and i male for 10 females.
Chanee is used mostly for reputed fungal resistance and wide compatability I thought.I heard that about india too .
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Cairns
15th June 2011 6:58pm
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fruitist says...
I have 2 salak growing in a pot in a shady and cold place for the last 7 years.

Wild Salaks and commercial qualities.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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15th June 2011 7:08pm
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fruitist says...
Salak (Salacca edulis for Bali or Salacca wallichiana for Thai) Called Sala or Rakum in Thai or Tagalog in Filipino. Also known as snake fruit or snakeskin fruit for its scaly appearance. It is a favorite fruit of Indonesia but very little known and seldom grown outside of its region of origin, Indonesia and Malaysia. Because of its quality as a fresh fruit, there is considerable interest in establishing it in other parts of the world. It occurs wild but is also found in carefully cultivated plantations. The palm has a very short or stemless trunk with pinnate fronds that grows in the rain forest as an understory tree. It is a thorny devil, and the bronze colored (1 is yellowish, 1 is brownish) fruits, borne in compact clusters among the branches, are difficult to harvest. The fruits appear to be covered with a scaly skin, the exocarp, which in reality is easily cut and removed from the fruit. The flesh is in 1 to 3 segments. Some have 2 undeveloped segments. For each developed segment, it normally contains a dark brown seed. The pulp is whitish or yellowish, soft but firm, with an unusual aroma and a sweet to subacid taste. The unripe fruits may be pickled and the ripe fruits may be cooked as preserves. Ripe fruits do not keep for more than a few days. Most of the salak palms are clearly male or female, but hermaphroditic palms occur on the island of Bali, and are much appreciated for the quality of their fruits. While palms may be grown from seeds, selected plants can be preserved by two techniques that depend on the tendency of the plant to multiply itself rapidly by rooted offshoots. However, removal of the sideshoots is a difficult process. In addition, the long, slim trunks can bend over and touch the soil, where they root readily and may be removed as separate plants. Growing conditions require high temperature and humidity throughout the year. Frost tender and sun sensitive when young. High and continuous water requirement. Take 4 year to bear fruits. Non-seasonal, flowers develop from June onwards. The Balinese Salaks have male and female (hot pink color) flowers on the one flower spike. The tiny male flowers are at the tip of the spike. To improve fruit set, it is recommended that the pollen from the Javanese male plants be hand pollinated onto bisexual varieties. Fruit takes 6 months to mature. Pick bunch when the individual fruit are easily picked. Must not show green colour under the skin. Pink spears pop up from the soil during germination. Baby shoots are quite cool tolerant to 2C. The Bali Salak is monoecious and bears brown skin fruits. The Thai Salak is diecious and bears red skin fruits.

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fruitist says...
Got to see SOON. State of Origin night. Bye. Maroons forever!
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15th June 2011 7:12pm
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Mike says...
Balis are actually Salacca zalacca amboina coming in 3 types but all are 'bisexual'.The rest of the 20-50 indonesian zalaccas are Sz.z with the 4 pondohs/yogiyartas being best.An excellent thai Szz is honey and I have not yet located it.
Maroons by 35 in spite of the weather with Ingliss to score first.
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Cairns
15th June 2011 7:18pm
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DURIAN says...
To 'Mike', from Cairns:
You said that you don't know when the big competition is in Penang, at your comment at; https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/duriun-trees-have-you-seen-any/#60259

The answer to that is at:
A better DURIAN thread:
https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/durian-does-it/#61376
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29th June 2011 8:05pm
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Mike says...
I saw the other comment about june 16 and will look at the link.
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Shaun says...
Generally, Malaysian Durian 'varieties' are more "flavoursome" (fuller taste and stronger smell).
Thai Durian generally has thicker pulp (the edible part), but milder flavour.

The Durian season in Balik Pulau (Penang, Malaysia) is around late June / early-mid July.
During my recent visit there, my Penang friends took me to a durian orchard there.
We paid RM10.00 (= AUD3.00) per person for "all you can eat" Durian Feast & Buffet (you are allowed to eat as much durian from as many varieties as you can possibly sampled !!)
I took some photos of Durian seedlings - they grow seedlings as rootstock for grafting named varieties in the orchard.
The seedlings were lined up against a sun-trapped wall for extra warmth to hasten germination:
Picture 1: Durian seeds sprouting @ 10 Days.
Picture 2: Assorted Durian seedlings @ 2 Weeks
Picture 3: Assorted Durian seedlings @ 3 Weeks
Picture 4: Durian sprout & Durian seedling
Picture 5: Durian seedling @ 4+ Weeks
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Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5
 
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29th August 2011 10:37am
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jimreevescairns says...
Hi
We had a fabulous time gorging on durians in Penang this year (July). We stayed at the Bao Sheng farm in one of his chalets and as it was late in the season visitor numbers were low which was a bonus. We had fantastic tastings of up to 7 different ones each day. Well worth it and the guy who runs it (Durian Seng) is great.
Be wary of buying durian seeds from abroad including the guy advertising on here - I tried it and had loads of problems with incorrect labelling and packaging and the with all the delays with customs and AQIS they were never viable when I got them - those guys will tell and sell you anything but I learned the hard way and gave them a fair few dollars before giving up. Others may have had more success
regards
Jim
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Cairns
20th September 2011 9:43pm
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Mike says...
Jim did you try red prawn,penang,D197 or D190?The initial stock brought in by DPI was mislabelled and that will always be a problem.My red prawn tree has shoots and may survive but it will be 5 years until I start getting fruit again after yasi.I do think the best Thai varieties are a bit better than the best malaysians but Penang is the place to try good ones.
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21st September 2011 6:16pm
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Jimreevescairns says...
Hi Mike
We ate red prawn, hor lor, little red and ang bak. He started us with fruit off younger trees then introduced us to fruit from much older trees with much more complex flavours. We finished with his prize winning red prawn off 40 year old trees that had blue veins throughout the flesh. We also ate old red prawns that had fallen within a couple of hours and the fruit actually makes your mouth go a bit numb for a while. The hor lor off old trees was another one I liked with quite noticeable chocolatey flavours. We ate nothing but durians for 2 days !
I brought some of the seeds back and have managed to germinate a dozen or so but the guy laughed at me for even considering growing them from seed - he reckons completely unpredictable as to fruit quality.
He had very healthy looking grafted seedlings of his best red prawn for 30 ringit which is $ 10 !!! Would love it to be possible to bring some in :) as to be honest I have bought durians from various sources around here over the last few years and they have mostly been pretty average compared to ones we have eaten in Asia
Regards
Jim
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22nd September 2011 9:50pm
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Mike says...
Jim alot of the best types are here but not at the markets and not from some backyard growers.It is a bit in-house.Mature trees do have way better fruit and seedlings are usually alright but take a long time and a proportion turn out to be ordinary.If you can lay your hands on the seeds of Hor Lor,Laplae or the Chanthaburis then they should still be outstanding.In Thailand it is $3 for epicotyl and hypocotyl grafted montongs and gumpun.I have seedlings from rusty's 'montongs' that are meant as rootstock and I might graft some of mine including the red prawn that is hanging on soon.
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23rd September 2011 6:15pm
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jimreevescairns says...
Mike
That's interesting to hear. Ah well have to hope mine taste good when they fruit.
I have a couple of monthong/chanee cross that I got from Limberlost that must be 5 years old now. One got blown over during Yasi but seems to be recovering. Think I will top them at 4-5 metres. Would be keen if you want to sell any grafts from nice ones when you do them. Don't have huge amounts of space but might try having a few short and stumpy ones - don't need them to produce many fruit to keep us happy and hopefully less damage when we get cyclones
Regards
Jim
Jim
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Cairns
23rd September 2011 9:24pm
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Mike says...
Jim no worries, I lost durians in yasi and larry and I hope it really was a chanee/monthong cross you got.I had a fruiting limberlost variety that was a beauty but they are a malaysian not thai style.It is better for everything to be pruned short.
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24th September 2011 11:29am
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jimreevescairns says...
Mike you made me think - it was a monthong gan yao (spelling) cross - well on the label anyway
Regards
Jim
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Cairns
25th September 2011 8:19am
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Mike says...
Funny that is what I was told was the parentage of my limberlost but it wasn't.It first fruited in its 5th year so was precocious.Gan Yeow is excellent and I have a small one.Was yours a Marcot?
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25th September 2011 9:30pm
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jimreevescairns says...
No they were seedlings. I did buy 2 of their marcots about 3 years ago but I knew even less about growing durians than I do now and they died pretty soon. I think I let too much direct sunlight get to them. Some guy on the rarefruit forum put up pictures of orchards he visited somewhere in Asia where they do marcots but then graft the base of a seedling into the stem of the marcot giving it a proper root system which I thought was interesting - I have no experience with grafting anything.
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Cairns
25th September 2011 11:32pm
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Mike says...
Marcotting is alright except in big wind and they may be more prone to phytophthora.Grafting extra rootstocks on is pretty common in asia and even grafting multiple rootstocks together before the top goes on.
There is almost nowhere left to get the trees now.I think only one farmer will be grafting good ones this season.
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26th September 2011 8:38pm
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jimreevescairns says...
That's a bit sad. Will those grafted ones be for sale do you know ?
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Cairns
27th September 2011 9:12am
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Mike says...
Jim,it will be very difficult to get the trees for a few years at least at many farmers and others who lost them in the cyclones want to replace them.There are lists of people waiting and with supply so low and demand at an all time high my original two sources have dried up.
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1st October 2011 9:33am
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jimreevescairns says...
Blimey it's that bad ! Wonder if it's remotely possible to import grafted material. Judging by my experiences trying to get seeds posted in I would suspect not. Ah well :-)
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17th October 2011 1:39pm
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Simon says...
It is very interesting to read all the comments from all of you so passionate about durian, no wonder it is the king of fruits. Does anyone have any success in growing durian in Perth areas? If so what varieties are suitable here, where can I get some seedlings or better still grafted durian plants? I am keen to try to grow some here.
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Simon8
Perth
22nd November 2011 3:33pm
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amanda says...
Hi Simon - I think Durian is strictly tropical...I would be amazed if someone has got it to grow and fruit in Perth?

I had my first taste of frozen durian from Thailand last week - I reckon my breath stunk of it for hours afterward..EEK! It thought it had a great underlying taste - but the "whole experience" nearly blew my head off :D Maybe they were a bit fermented or something..? Very, very rich and ultra creamy.
Do they always taste so full on guys?
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amanda19
Geraldton. Mide West WA.
23rd November 2011 7:48pm
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd November 2011 7:49pm
fldurian says...
Hi Mike,

Are you able to provide me with the contacts of your two sources for grafted seedlings?

Hopefully they will come online soon.

fldurian@yahoo.com

thanks,
fldurian
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14th December 2011 8:41pm
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Mike says...
Peter Salleras at Feluga who runs an orchard of the best tropical fruits is probably the only hope.He has the best varieties and is bouncing back after the big blow.The company is forest fruit or fruit forest?,anyway you might have to order well in advance as he supplies growers and is a genuine expert.My recent approach and cleft grafting attempts failed.
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15th December 2011 11:59pm
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Lindsay says...
Hi all,
I am writing a book about the durian and am looking for information about durian in Australia. Could someone please tell me when the peak season for durian is in both Queensland and the Northern Territory, as well as point me to the best growing areas/farms?
Thanks!
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Durianwriter
Costa Rica
16th December 2011 8:01am
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Mike says...
In Queensland (lat 16 to 18) it is Dec to April and in the NT (lat 13ish) Nov to Feb.The best areas are in the wet tropics lowlands in the 3500mm/yr+ zone.The NT around Darwin where they are grown is drier than they prefer.
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Cairns
16th December 2011 3:34pm
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Lalaine says...
My jackfruit tree is flowering but after the fruit is 1 - 2 cm it drops off..why is this?
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Lalaine
Brisbane
18th December 2011 10:53am
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fldurian says...
Thanks Mike for the contact.
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fldurian
vic
20th December 2011 8:13pm
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fruit lover says...
Gee having read through this forum I cant believe how spiteful Dur Ian and the person hiding behind Anonymous sounds. Who cares what fruit it is? Good on Marcello for having a go a growing either one of them I say....
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fruit lover1
Sydney
15th January 2012 2:39pm
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David says...
Just as a side issue just picked my first Florigan mango for the season , had it for desert, great.
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David
brisbane
15th January 2012 8:02pm
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Rev says...
Re: note from rose above
My edibles list was from nsw
Then I was in Townsville
Now I'm in Jakarta and Bali
And might even take a job in the Maluku islands next, or Burma
Come one come all :)
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Rev
Abroad
23rd January 2012 4:56am
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Rev says...
Anyone need durian seeds sent from indonesia?
I accept paypal, bpay or funds to Aussie or Indonesian account.

Mangosteen

and rambutan also

Rambutan subung a medium sweet red freestone

And the high price green sweet rambutan rafiah

are in season

Also can send
Kweni (mangifera odorata)
Duku (Lansium domesticum)

And others

:)
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Rev
Abroad
23rd January 2012 5:07am
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Mike says...
Rev your posts today resonate with me and seem to hit the mark. I bet it is great strolling around the markets and gardens and seeing how people use their plants.Some of the fruits over there would certainly be prized additions to gardens over here.
There is a large fruited kind of mangosteen not quite as sweet but very early fruiting that would be ideal for NEQ.It probably came from a separate original crossing event.Willughbeas,the durian x graveolans/zibethinus,really good kwenis and the local grass jellies would be hot items over here.
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23rd January 2012 8:07am
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Mike says...
Rev is the duku variety you are seeing a good quality one? Have you stumbled across any good quality maprangs,salaks,marangs or jak/chempadak in your travels?I think Peter from Feluga brought back some M.odorata from Bali last year.
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Cairns
23rd January 2012 9:26am
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arayawat says...
Hi Rev,
Can you get me durian seeds?
Red durian and other native durians. Paypal is OK.
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arayawat
Brisbane
27th January 2012 3:47pm
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arayawat says...
Hi Rev,
Can you get me durian seeds?
Red durian and other native durians. Paypal is OK.
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arayawat
Brisbane
27th January 2012 4:03pm
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Original Post was last edited: 5th February 2013 6:39pm
Kinan says...
Hi Mike and Rev,
Would love to collabarate with fellow locals. I am determined to grow Durians on the tablelands and would like to draw upon your knowledge and experience.
Have a friend heading over to Borneo and Sumatara next week who will send me back seeds. He is there for 3 months.
Bukkutinggi Durians grow at 900m but only 1 degree south of equator. Do you think they would have a chance? We are at 330+m here but of course further south of equator. Uttaradit is at 1600m ? Do they grow there ? That might be a better prospect.
hope to hear from you -
kinan33@hotmail.com

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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 8:59am
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Mike says...
Kuranda should be OK for some zibethinus but it is mostly above 400m.Red prawn is quite cold tolerant,long and lin laplae from near utteradit,kradum also grows in cooler places.I suggest you access the Zappala report that deals with cold tolerance of durians in NQ.Then try you best to get a grafted plant.Plants from 900M (0.6 cooler with each 100M) at the equator would be good to try.Other durian species from cooler uplands might not have the quality of zibethinus.Some are good but you don't want to be waiting years to rake your teeth over seeds for a veneer of ordinary tasting flesh.You need to get good quality ones.Utteradit is a bit lower than that,check out the village of Laplae.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 9:16am
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Kinan says...
Thanks for your reply. They seem to grow here if in a sheltered position, but I only know of one guy who has them fruiting. He is at the top of the range a bit lower down from Kuranda and very sheltered into the rainforest. He says that he is on the verge and no-one past him would have any luck. Some years he has a good crop and others not much luck. Is Red Prawn a grafted variety only, or can it grow from seed ok ? Which town if any in Borneo or Sumatara would have some ?
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 1:00pm
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Mike says...
Being surround by RF moderates minimum temps and there isn't much diff. between Black Mt road, Myola, the town and even Speewah but it varies locally near creeks,on ridges,in open forest etc.Is that the Marshalls place you are talking about because they thrive there.Anyway Borneo at higher altitude would have more variety but if you can find 1000m alt with durian in Sumatra, why not? Seedlings of most types will take too long and may not be true to type.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 1:11pm
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Kinan says...
Yes, I see what you are saying. There is much variance within an area as far as pockets and micro-climates that are warmer or would suffer less from lower end temps. Where we are, all my seedlings that were planted out in our large permaculture veggie garden died over a 1 yr period, yet the 2 planted amongst the forested area are still going, the bigger one after dropping all it's leaves after the last winter cold snap. It's come back now. Yes, I was fortunate to visit John's place last week, very large trunked Durians and fruit on but not as many as hoped..
Personally, I am impressed with the case for seedlings vs. grafted where possible although I can also see the reasons for grafted. Reliable fruit and earlier bearing. Planning on a bit of both in my nursery. How does Durian go as a seedling ? How many out of 10 would be good or similar to the parent?
When you say more variety in Borneo, do you mean also within zibethinus. It sounds like you are implying that more variety would equal greater chances of success of finding a suitable variety.
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 3:33pm
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Mike says...
Yes I was suggesting that the localised variation due to the veg and landscape configuration probably outweighs other considerations.Should there be another 1984 winter (-5 in herberton and ravenshoe and big kuranda frosts)then it is a wipeout.There are lighter crops all over due to 'wind problems'.It is only recently that thjey have been grafted and it is a good idea to have seedlings and grafted ones.Some seedlings are just like a blend of parents or one of them but some are not.Old stable varieties originally grown from seed lines (eg montong) would be more predictable than multi-croosed new ones (eg D190).Malaysian Borneo would have more zibethinus diversity and Borneo more good durian species generally.Good stuff turns up in unlikely places and excellent durians could be in small settlements anywhere in the whole region.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 4:01pm
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Mike says...
Yes I was suggesting that the localised variation due to the veg and landscape configuration probably outweighs other considerations.Should there be another 1984 winter (-5 in herberton and ravenshoe and big kuranda frosts)then it is a wipeout.There are lighter crops all over due to 'wind problems'.It is only recently that thjey have been grafted and it is a good idea to have seedlings and grafted ones.Some seedlings are just like a blend of parents or one of them but some are not.Old stable varieties originally grown from seed lines (eg montong) would be more predictable than multi-croosed new ones (eg D190).Malaysian Borneo would have more zibethinus diversity and Borneo more good durian species generally.Good stuff turns up in unlikely places and excellent durians could be in small settlements anywhere in the whole region.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 4:01pm
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Kinan says...
Thanks Mike. With a grafted tree do you think the highland durian would be more critical as the rootstock or as the scion ?
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 6:45pm
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Kinan says...
Mike, I need some help working out what Tropicals can grow well from seed and which varieties do best, as I would like to grow seedlings where possible. Any chance you could compile a list based on your growing experience ?
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 8:16pm
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Mike says...
All non-zibethinus probably should be seedlings.That storm out there is grumbling and I suppose it has passed through kuranda already.If it is only cool temperature tolerance you're focussed on then the scion is more critical.How about you tell me what you want to plant to plant and I'll comment if I think I have something to offer,rather than doing a speculative list.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 8:31pm
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Kinan says...
Yes, storm passed over with intensity, quite now except the frogs singing and some distant rumbles.
That list is extensive. Maybe that's something we could discuss over a cup of tea or sugar cane juice. I am heading to Rustys early Friday seed hunting. Any chance of catching up ?
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 9:35pm
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Mike says...
I am going to Rusty's on Friday at 6.30am to 7am and I might be back briefly at lunch time.It is always better to have a list and then cut out the marginal ones.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 9:46pm
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Kinan says...
I will see you at the Durians at 6.30am
Start working on that list meanwhile..
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 9:51pm
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Mike says...
OK the stall with the fake montongs,mammays,yellow rambutans and purple fleshed sweet potatoes.Look for the tall dashing fellow in the hawaiin shirt.
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Cairns
28th January 2012 10:00pm
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Kinan says...
Just the spot I was thinking of.
See you there !
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Kinan
Kuranda
28th January 2012 10:16pm
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fldurian says...
Just curious, how are the seeds shipped? I thought it wasn't allowed in? Is it a matter to try your luck with the mail?
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fldurian
vic
30th January 2012 6:47pm
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Mike says...
fldurian you just look on the permitted seed list or check on aqis icon.If they pose little disease or pest risk and are basic in terms of conditions of entry there is no big deal.Mail or on the plane back with you is fine and they just have to be declared.
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Cairns
30th January 2012 7:00pm
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David says...
Hi Mike . got the emails and thanks for that have emailed you back so look in the morning.
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David
Brisbane
30th January 2012 7:05pm
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fldurian says...
Thanks Mike. This is great information.
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fldurian
vic
31st January 2012 2:09pm
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Mike says...
fldurian if you successfully grow durians in Victoria you should be given a nobel prize for horticulture.If you do the impossible and bring in seeds of a Chanthaburi 1 or 2,or a thornless durian and then successfully grow it you deserve a street parade as well.
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Cairns
31st January 2012 9:43pm
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Rev says...
Hi people I'm back again
Reville1@gmail.com is my email
I'm settling in somewhere in Asia and getting a job
I just got back from exploring Cambodia and Vietnam. I didn't find their fruits that exotic, but the animals herbs and vegetables were!
The mango in Saigon this time of year is especially good
Aromatic, sweet but tart, crisp like and apple - any guess on what variety it might be??
Anyway contact me individually and we can figure out how to send seeds effectively starting with sample packets.
Yes duku is in season now, I'll do some research
For example there's the best rambutans here rambutan Rapiah / rafia they are kinda green, smaller with short hairs and sweet
While the subung area rambutans are less sweet but completkey freestone.
Mainly I'm collecting herbs n gingers for myself because here grafted fruit trees are incredibly cheap. Grafted durians for example maybe 6 - 12 aud. Most other trees are much less.
Mangosteen are in season still. There's a white skin variety out there too, and a red mangosteen that is another variety.
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Rev
Jakarta, Indonesia
11th March 2012 7:10am
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JUJUBE FOR SALE IN MELBOURNE says...
Hi Rev,

I think most of mango varieties are now from either Thailand, Taiwan or Australia. I think the one you tasted probably from Taiwan or Keow Savoy from Thailand.
Good luck to your job seeking venture.
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JUJUBE FOR SALE
 
11th March 2012 10:32am
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amanda says...
Those fruits sound fascinating Rev..and very exotic too (speaking as a southerner.. :) Look forward to reading your comments on them..
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amanda19
Geraldton, 400km North of Perth
11th March 2012 11:33am
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Damien says...
Mike,
Where were you able to get your Durian plant, I want to get one to grow/try to grow.
Would it be possible to buy one through you at all?

Regards
Damien
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Damien1
Brisbane
30th May 2012 1:52pm
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Mike says...
Damien I did get a small grafted montong durian recently from the owner of Fruit Forest Farms between Mission beach and Tully.While I already have 6 small trees this one was a welcomed addition.It took 2 years to get it and I don't know if they have any more.In brisbane you really should be trying a red prawn or perhaps D.macrantha and you need 2 for x pollination as they are usually not 'selfing'.I can check when I speak to him next and I don't know if they send trees away.
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Cairns
30th May 2012 5:42pm
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Mike says...
My friend Mike P making a selkection of grafted durians.kradum tong and red prawn were favoured by him.Damien they are prohibitively expensive and would be hard to get to briz but I will be back at that place.
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Cairns
3rd June 2012 3:27pm
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BJ says...
damien, which part of brisbane are you in?
Good work Mike. How many durio have you got in the ground now?
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
3rd June 2012 6:43pm
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Mike says...
BJ fancy catchin up with you here.I have 2 gumpuns, a red prawn,P 88,luang,limberlost,gaan yeow and a montong to be planted so a very modest selection.Larry took out my D190 and pomoho montong when they had small fruit for the first time.Yasi killed my fruiting original limberlost and the red prawn with its first flowers.
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Cairns
3rd June 2012 7:23pm
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durian grower says...
This is a jackfruit tree.
Jackfruit plant produces a white sap.
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durian grower
malaysia
17th August 2012 10:29pm
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dan says...
can any one help me get some durian seeds that will grow in cairns
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dan14
cairns
26th January 2013 12:38pm
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trikus says...
Buy some fruit at Rustys .
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Trikus
 
28th January 2013 10:04pm
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arayawat says...
Hi dan,
You can get Monthog seedling from
Limberlost Nursery in cairns or Kan yao seedlings and seeds from Cape Trib Exotic Fruit Farm. Just look up on internet for thier information.
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arayawat
Brisbane
3rd February 2013 2:44pm
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Original Post was last edited: 3rd February 2013 2:46pm
Zakaria says...
I'm sorry to to tell you this, but I think the fruit looks like a jack fruit. It is not a durian.
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Zakaria
Malaysia
17th February 2013 12:19am
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Zakaria says...
I'm sorry to to tell you this, but I think the fruit looks like a jack fruit. It is not a durian.
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Zakaria
Malaysia
17th February 2013 12:19am
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Izzi Dole says...
On a recent visit to Cairns last week in Tropical Queensland I saw a Durian fruit being sold at the Rusty Markets. It was looking very fresh and that's the biggest fruit I have ever seen in my whole life and I guess it would weigh nearly 10kg.It was very smelly and very spiky indeed unlike the one's you find at the super markets imported from Thailand.Even back home in my country of birth I have never come across such a massive fruit.The vendor was selling the fruit for 50 dollars Australian.Once my mother gave her friend who is an expert a durian to make a delicious drink but she never got it back. She told her that she just couldn't resist and drank everything .It's suppose to enhance the sexual appetite for men.
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Izzi Dole
Georges Hall
27th May 2013 3:29pm
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durianaddict says...
hi all .. wondering when is the exotic fruit fair in australia ? i want to go to get the fresh durian .. want to try to grow some :D

anybody ordered seeds on ebay before ? if you buy, wanna split with me to try ... i am in brisbane :d

maybe i should try to get the seeds in indonesia/malaysia and bring it on plane but will it be taken away though ???? how to ensure it is allowed in ?

thanks

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durianaddict
brisbane
18th July 2013 8:48am
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Muar888 says...
I have durian seedlings growing in my garden. Soon will have Rambutan; Mangosteen; Langsat; Duku as well Fifth generation Malaysian Chinese with lots of relatives growing tropical fruit trees. Will have around 200 ten month old seedlings at around October 2014 of six varieties of durian trees; Duku; Rambutan; Pulasan Duku. Always have seedlings of Dragon Fruit; Mangoes; Avocados; Black Mulberry; Ginseng; Goji Berry; Gynura Procumbens (or Sambung Nyawa) all kinds of Cactus etc etc. price on asking to rayshuy@hotmail.com Cheers
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Muar888
Beechboro
18th December 2013 2:26am
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Canh says...
Personally I think there's a major difference in the smell between Jackfruit and Durian.. Jackfruit has sweet scent compare to Durian.. I love both fruits but yes durian does have that distinctive odour that lingers around. Durian is like cooking, if you fry garlic in oil you can put up with the smell but if you walk into someone's house who's frying garlic in oil then your stomach might churn a little.
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Canh
Canberra
23rd June 2014 4:09pm
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Mee says...
Agree its a Jack Fruit. Seeds are tasty if roasted (almost like Chestnuts). Durian are spiky fruits.
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Mee
Melbourne, Bundoora
10th August 2014 10:40pm
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kong says...
Hi howdy..ya thats a jackfruit ..it smells really sweet when ripe and oh ya you can boil the seed with bit salt and it taste like nuts.
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kong
vic
23rd November 2014 8:48pm
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd November 2014 8:48pm
Shazz says...
Is the large spiky fruit a Durian? If not what it is?
I have recently moved into a neglected property SE Qld, unfortunately the garden, although not very large has been completely neglected so my first task will be to tidy everything up and get it looking healthy, I have paw paw trees and persimmon trees all bearing edible fruit however are completely overgrown, can I "tame" these trees by cutting them back? I also have a tree which bears the spiky fruit in the picture. I don't know what it is but the tree is very overgrown and not in a very good position. I have been advised to just get rid of it. As nobody seems to know this is I do not want to do that just yet. However it will need to be cut back as it is very tall and potentially damaging to next doors property as well as in an awful position for me. The fruits vary in size, some are 20-30cms, heart shaped and plentiful. I did cut one open and it looked liked the insides of a custard ape, although it wasn't ripe it was hard to really establish. There is no smell as some suggest. If you know what it is please provide me with as much info as possible , when to pick, when ripe, how to maintain. We do have a lot of bats in this area but they do not seem interested in the fruit at this stage. Could it be the odour they are picking up on? If sp could it possibly been planted to protect the paw paws?
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Shazz
4212
20th February 2015 8:34am
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sternus1 says...

That giant spiky thing is a soursop, and it is huge.

Delicious fruit but full of fibre. Try juicing it.
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sternus1
Australia
20th February 2015 8:43am
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Bigbigboy says...
Hi there, can I buy durian seed from you?
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Bigbigboy
2112
23rd June 2015 9:19pm
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd June 2015 9:18pm
JohnMc1 says...
We do not sell Durian seed, seedlings, trees, fruit.
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JohnMc1
Warnervale NSW
24th June 2015 8:16am
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Journey1491 says...
Belinda Chen said that Appearance-wise, they may be a little difficult to tell apart if you're not familiar with either. However, durian has a much more thorny appearance than the jackfruit and looks like it might actually be kind of painful to hold (resembles the shell of Bowser in Super Mario Bros., haha). The skin of the jackfruit somewhat resembles that of lychee a little, more bulbous and less pointy than the durian. Also, jackfuit seems to be able to get much bigger than durian and often times are oblong, whereas durian is a bit rounder in shape.

Taste-wise, they're quite different. Jackfruit is rather sweet, once again, a little like lychee. Durian, on the other hand, is an acquired taste. It has a slight smothered sulfur smell and taste to it. If you're used to fermented foods, you might be ok with it; otherwise, it may be quite unusual to your tastebuds. I tried durian for the first time just a year ago, and at first, I didn't mind it, but I wouldn't have hankered for it normally. However, after having tried a few more durian desserts, I actually enjoy the flavor.
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Enter Postcode First,33775,
4th July 2016 11:34am
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Original Post was last edited: 4th July 2016 11:57am

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