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mandarin tree

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scott starts with ...
Hi, I was considering planting a mandarin tree in my backyard can anyone help me in deciding which variety would be best suited. The position I where the tree would go is in sunlight most of the day. And also how deep should the hole be and what type of soil should I use. If you can suggest any hints that may help me that would be great.
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scott4
sydney
4th May 2008 8:50am
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Anonymous says...
The Japanese seedless are the tastiest.
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4th May 2008 7:00pm
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Shaun says...
Yep, most Japanese mandarins are very tasty, and there are seedless varieties too.
I like Silverhill and Miho .... they are small very ornamental trees, suitable for pots too, and they are early varieties.
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5th May 2008 12:04am
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Leona says...
I have a Silverhill - I havent tasted the fruit (not quite ripe yet but will be soon). I cant wait! I do like Japanese and Imperials too though...I would like to get one of those too but not much point as they fruit at the same time. All of these are small varieties which have lovely, loose skin (easier to peel), sweet flesh and little or no seeds.

In regards to how deep the hole should be, just make sure you plant the tree the same level as it was in the pot and do not cover the graft. Put some organic soil conditioner and some mushroom compost in the hole when you plant it too - this will give it a good start. And having it in sunlight most of the day is a necessity for it to set fruit ;-) Good luck and let us know what varietiy you decide on.
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5th May 2008 12:17pm
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Henry says...
On the subject of mandarins, I have a few Satsuma Okawasi variety in my garden. These are sweet, loose skinned (easy to peel) and seedless, and as you see, huge. Can anyone tell me why some segments of the same fruit are not as juicy as the rest (kind of dry).
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Henry
Blacktown
27th May 2008 8:33pm
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Dekka says...
Henry, Spiny Citrus Bug will cause individual segments to be dry and Boron deficiency will cause whole fruit to be dry.
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Dekka
Newcastle
27th May 2008 11:11pm
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Henry says...
Thanks for the info, Dekka, much appreciated. But I use the Citrus All-Purpose Granulated Fertiliser. Isn't that enough? Maybe not enough?
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Henry
Blacktown
31st May 2008 7:20am
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Mark says...
I planted 2 Satsuma Miho last year at my school. They fruited well and the kids love them. Easy to peel and no seeds are a big plus to getting kids eating fruit.
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Mark5
Blacktown
4th June 2008 9:43pm
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Henry says...
Yes, the Satsuma mandarins are really delicious, easy to peel and seedless, a big plus for the adult kids too. Do you get dry segments in your mandarins, Mark, and where did you purchase the Satsuma Mihos from? I deweed the base of my trees every two months from weeds and invading grass, then topped up with garden mix and cow manure, and a sprinkle of Citrus All Purpose Granulated Fertiliser. The trees look healthy but the fruit are temperamentally dry in one or two segments.
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Henry
Blacktown
5th June 2008 11:01am
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Mark says...
Hello Henry. I haven't had any dry segments as yet. I get the kids to weed around them and top up the mulch when it is needed. I'm sorry to say that they haven't had the best of care since planting and got no extra water at all over the January holidays. However they have given quite a lot of fruit for 2 little trees. I noticed today that one tree was looking poorly and had some large white scale. I will have the kids deal with it after explaining what it is. I plan to put in 3 more trees. I purchased these 2 from Bonnyrigg Garden Centre but will source the new ones from Plantmark at Kellyville
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Mark5
Blacktown
11th June 2008 7:41pm
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scott says...
mark, where is plantmark in kellyville, I still havent planted any yet been to wet for a little for the last few weeks, i think i have decided on the Satsuma.
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oakhurst
12th June 2008 8:32pm
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Jake says...
At what age does a mandarin tree begin to bear fruit? What age does it stop bearing fruit? What is the average life-span of a mandarin tree?
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JaketheSnake
Perth
26th June 2008 3:14am
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John says...
12 months, 20 years plus.

have a look at albany hwy Kelmscott, those trees were planted in the 70's and are covered with fruit.
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John20
Perth
26th June 2008 10:28am
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louri says...
i bought and planted a mandarin tree in autumn. I cover it at night fof frost is it necessary? When do i prune? looks like the trunk is splitting do i need to apply some oil paint against mould? ta
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kelmscott
26th June 2008 11:28pm
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John says...
Don't bother with a cover, the commercial guys in Kelmscott never do and they get great yields.

Have a look at the joint opposite Lake RD, or further south near the pub.
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John20
Perth
27th June 2008 10:36am
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paul says...
hello, i have an old manadarin tree, the fruit this year is plentiful but small. I havent pruned it - is this why the fruit is like it is ? And when should I prune it ? thanks

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paul12
sydney
10th July 2008 6:52pm
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Lin says...
And I have a Mandarin tree that is only a few years old, about 4 feet high and the fruit, whilst plentiful is small. It is in the same plot as all my other citrus trees which are doing really well, so I doubt it is a soil/nutrient problem.
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Lin
Armadale WA
11th July 2008 10:12am
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Correy says...
Some mandarin trees fruit bi-annually.

Perhaps after it finishes fruiting you could prune out the center out of it. You won't get fruit in the center next year but the outer branches should fruit really well.

That's what we did and we got the best crop the tree has ever produced.
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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
11th July 2008 5:54pm
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Lin says...
That makes sense. I've now realised I have done that to my other mandarin tree (much larger) that produces beautifully sized fruits. Thanks, sometimes you overlook the simplest solutions....
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Lin
Armadale WA
13th July 2008 12:13pm
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Brian Burke says...
Can anyone tell me where I can get a brochure on pruning mandarine trees please? Dept Ag? DPI? Gayndah?
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Brian Burke
Gold Coast
3rd September 2008 6:31am
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Mark says...
Hi Henry, sorry for the delay in replying but have been busy. Plantmark is in Withers Rd. Check their website. www.plantmark.com.au.
I have had to order some Satsuma mandarins to add to the 2 I have at my school as they were out of stock. Good luck,
Mark
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Mark5
Blacktown
15th September 2008 9:11pm
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Mark says...
Hi Scott.
Check out the website at www.plantmark.com.au.
Plantmark SELECT
3 Withers Road 2155
Tel: 02 9629 4444
Fax: 02 9629 4355
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Mark5
Blacktown
15th September 2008 9:15pm
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margaret cryer says...
my mandarin tree won,t fruit
did last year but not now never prined it.
thank you margaret
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margaret cryer
new zealand
24th September 2008 1:30pm
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Henry says...
Hi Mark, thanks for info on Plantmark. I took my family there couple of weeks ago. They only admit and retail to Trade Customers. You need to be in the landscaping or plant nursery business as well as being a registered trade member with Plantmark before you can purchase anything.
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Henry
Blacktown
24th September 2008 8:37pm
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scott says...
when planting a mandarin tree is it ok to have the grass run up too the trunk or should i put surrounding around it like the ones people put around rose bushes. I read that the trunk can be mulched but no closer than 25cm around the base.would this count for the grass too??
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scott4
oakhurst
29th September 2008 2:55pm
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Scott G says...
Citrus have shallow roots and dont like anything growing under them. Grass should be kept right back to the drip line. There should only be mulch under the tree. If you are going to grow grass under then expect to stunt the trees growth and productivity. The reason for keeping mulch etc away from the trunk is to avoid keeping the trunk damp. Citrus suffer from many types of rot and so the trunk needs to stay dry. If the grass is kept short it can be grown up to the trunk without causing rot.
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Scott G
The Gold Coast
29th September 2008 7:02pm
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scott says...
I take alot of pride in my grass and it is always kept to a very short length, permitting this was always the case i assume it would be ok correct? What does everyone else do when planting them, what sort of surrounds etc. thanks for the reply Scott G.
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scott4
oakhurst
29th September 2008 9:11pm
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scott says...
when planting them should i use potting mix of any sort or just use a bit of fertilizer?
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scott4
oakhurst
30th September 2008 4:35pm
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Mark says...
Mulch to the drip line scott. I keep a spade edge around my trees and the mulched area increases as the tree grows. I dig in some cow manure when planting and water with a weak seaweed solution. There is also plenty of good citrus food on the market.
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Mark5
Blacktown
30th September 2008 11:08pm
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Mark says...
Hey Henry, sorry about that. Perhaps you can find someone nearby who can buy one for you. I have had to put 2 on order for my school as they had sold out. Have you tried the Bonnyrigg Garden Centre?
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Mark5
Blacktown
30th September 2008 11:12pm
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Lin says...
Just a quick question for a friend who is living in southern spain, she has a mandarin tree, only young at the moment,however it grows then appears to be dying i.e the leaves start to curl and appear to be drying out? anyone got any suggestions, she also has a lime tree at other end of her little plot which is thriving wonderfully.
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Lin1
england
5th October 2008 9:46pm
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Henry says...
Hi Mark, it's okay. At least, I have been there and browsed around. No, I have not been to Bonnyrigg Garden Centre yet, but will go there next weekend, perhaps. The last time I was out at Plantmark just to browse, their fruit trees selection was pretty poor. They don't have too many varieties and what they had probably were there for a few years. How do you tell if a tree has spent too long in a pot?
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Henry
Blacktown
10th October 2008 8:11pm
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scott says...
hey all, i have planted my orange and mandarin tree and seems its there 1st year out of a pot, they have alot of flowers and are just about to start fruiting, should i cut some of the flowers off? I am worried about the fruit being to heavy for a young tree or should it be ok?
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scott4
oakhurst
19th October 2008 10:00am
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Henry says...
Hi Mark, went to Bonnyrigg Garden Centre yesterday. They have, besides Emperor and Imperial, a Japanese variety - no name, just a description saying it produces large fruit, seedless and sweet. The staff could not tell me the type either. I was looking for a more specific Mihowase Satsuma. Would you say the variety they have is Miho? I just don't want to assume, and find out in later years that I was incorrect in my assumption.
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Henry
Blacktown
19th October 2008 10:42am
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Jantina says...
We have a mandarin labelled Japanese Seedless and it,s very good. Large ,sweet, seedless,easy to peel and early bearing.Jantina
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19th October 2008 1:12pm
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Shaun says...
Most Japanese seedless Mandarins are similar ....
very sweet and early season fruits ....
Miho, Okitsu and Silverhill are all very similar .... they are all bread from the satsuma seedless mandarins.
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Shaun
WA / Perth
23rd October 2008 1:23am
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Marina says...
Hey Everyone,

I recently moved into a property that has a Mandarin Tree in the backyard. I have noticed that there are these orange bugs all over the tree.. Does anybody know what they are and how i can get rid of them?
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Marina2
Sydney
16th November 2008 6:36pm
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Laaz says...
If they are assassin bugs, they are good bugs and you should leave them be. They eat the bad bugs. Have a look here:

http://www.richard-seaman.com/Wallpaper/Nature/Bugs/ThreadLeggedAssassinBug.jpg
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Charleston, SC USA
16th November 2008 11:38pm
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Dekka says...
They are juvenile Citrus Bugs. It might sound mad but regularly collecting them with a vacuum cleaner is the least toxic way to deal with them.
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Dekka
Newcastle
17th November 2008 3:33pm
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Telly says...
I have just plant a little mandarin tree. Its about 1 meter tall with about 10 leaves on it. I was wondering if there are any plants that I can plant near it / underneath it that would be suitable? or what plants would be harmfull to the mandarin tree? Also I dont want it t grow too tall - is it ok to keep it pruned so it doesnt get too big? also we live near to coast - is there any tips that I nee to know?
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Telly1
Perth WA
18th November 2008 1:28pm
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John says...
Plant nothing near it, citrus are shallow rooted, keep this area clear for max growth of your tree. Mulch thickly.
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John20
Perth
18th November 2008 5:13pm
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sid says...
Lin & Louri where can i purches a SATSUMA tree
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sid
perth
27th November 2008 11:30am
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John says...
Tass 1 trees upper swan, gt nthn hwy
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John20
Perth
27th November 2008 11:49am
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john says...
tass 1 has silverhill, i got one 2 weeks ago.. only $10..
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bayswater
28th November 2008 7:55pm
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sid says...
Thanks John for information
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sid
perth
1st December 2008 11:07am
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Mark says...
Hi Telly. I often put annuals under my citrus and all are happy but you can't dig deeply as, like John says, they do have shallow surface roots. I have a 9 year old lemon that has had heliotrope and some autumn crocus growing under it for all this time. Eureka lemons are pretty tough.
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Mark5
Blacktown
4th December 2008 5:49pm
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Mark says...
Marina the citrus bug can be a real pest. They can be green, orange and black depending on their maturity. I pick mine off with tongs if the tree is not too big. Confidor is also very good at killing them and doesn't affect the tree at all. Pest Oil doesn't seem to work very well. Be careful as they are also called stink beetles for a very good reason. They suck the sap out of all the new growth which then withers.

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Mark5
Blacktown
4th December 2008 5:52pm
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sid says...
I am just planting a SILVERHILL what fertilzer will use in the hole.

sid
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sid
perth
9th December 2008 10:02am
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John says...
none, they are all bad.

fertilse after a couple of weeks with sealres kickalong fert.
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John20
Perth
9th December 2008 1:14pm
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Charles says...
My mandarin tree is 19years old.About eight days ago I noticed that all of its leaves were drooping usually a sign of lack water.This is a semi-tropical area and the average rainfall days for November over the last six years is six but this year there were twelve such days.Do you think that this may have caused this condition? Since discovering its condition I have watered each evening. have I added to its condition.
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Charles1
Burleigh Heads SE Queensland
16th December 2008 5:50pm
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John says...
We water at 80% of evaporation, on hotter days this means daily watering as the sands have a low RAW coefficient.
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John20
Perth
17th December 2008 12:49pm
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Mike says...
Hi Margaret,

My Imperial tree never fruited for some years until I gave it the ultimatum... fruit next year or out you come. Amazing it has fruited every year since.

Then again it may be because I am being a lot kinder to it.
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Slicko
Brisbane
21st December 2008 9:12pm
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Caroline Jeyaprakash says...
As Mark says I have found a sort of orange and and dark brown insects on my mandarin tree. This year the fruits were not many although there were plenty of flowers and segments of fruits were dry. Now I have found a kind of beetles/bugs/weevils sitting all over the tips of branches. When I try to splash water with the hose they smell a lot. They stink. Can someone suggest a remedy for this.
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Caroline Jeyaprakash
West Hoxton
22nd December 2008 9:44am
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Mike says...
Stink bugs! I use white oil on mine. It suffocates them
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Slicko
Brisbane
23rd December 2008 5:31pm
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Mike says...
ps you need to keep the water up to them. During the drought I uses all the washing water to keep mine alive and fruiting.

The thing worth doing is googling citrus nutrition on the web. There is heaps of info and I am sure you will find that there is sufficient to resolve your bearing problems :)
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Slicko
Brisbane
23rd December 2008 5:33pm
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Mark says...
Caroline. Confidor also works well against the stink bugs
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Mark5
Blacktown
27th December 2008 3:21pm
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RolFlor a says...
BORON DEFICIENCY : Is it caused by artificial fertilisers and/or lack of adequate mulch?
Au Naturel.
Mulch can be free by the 10m3 truckload.
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie Loser Heights ' , Sydney
30th December 2008 11:04am
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Adele says...
I planted an Imperial Mandarin only 5-6 weeks ago and something seems to be eating the very young growth on it, small black things. Are they black aphids?
I sprayed with White Oil but are worried about damaging such a young tree. Any advice? thanks
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Adele
Melbourne
6th January 2009 1:04pm
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John says...
Aphids possibly, but getting too hot for them, are they little stink bugs?

Dimethoate would be good, but Bunnings would sell softer things if you that way inclined.
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John20
Perth
6th January 2009 1:22pm
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peter says...
adele,
can you see lots of the small black things you describe.
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peter30001
adelaide
6th January 2009 1:26pm
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Adele says...
yes, there are lots, I only saw them on the leaves after I sprayed with White Oil. Now the young leaves are turning a light brown and look like dropping off.
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Adele
Melbourne
7th January 2009 9:26am
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Alison says...
I have an old but very productive mandarin tree in my backyard in Bayswater. Every year it bears a great crop but every year most of the fruit is infested with fruit fly rendering the crop pretty well inedibile. I have tried eco friendly traps, sprays with eco oil and, finally, full on treatment with Rogor - to no avail. I am always extremely careful to collect the fallen fruit each day and to dispose of it carefully to prevent fruit fly attack but, so far, nothing prevents the infestation. There do not appear to be any neighbours with trees or bad fruit fly habits. What can I do to save my annual mandarin crop?????
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alison6
Perth
8th January 2009 10:46am
#UserID: 1833
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peter says...
adele,
seems strange that you only saw them
after you sprayed, white oil shouldnt
affect leaves.
if they were aphids they should have been quite visible before spraying.

are they still there.
if they are all sitting with there bums
up in the air then they would be aphids.
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peter30001
adelaide
8th January 2009 12:23pm
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Adele says...
Thanks Peter, I have lots of dead aphids now on the leaves. Also, we had some heavy rain in the area for a few days so I suspect the brown leaves could be wet feet. Should I let it dry out 2-3 weeks if there's no more rain?
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Adele
Melbourne
8th January 2009 2:44pm
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John says...
Alison

How are you applying the fruit fly spray?

Eco oil etc don't work on fruit fly, and are not registered for such, do you follow the label rules by the letter, then your mandos will be OK!

fenthion works just as well.

It takes 7 litres of made up mix to cover the average tree, every fruit and
leaf must be sprayed.
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John20
Perth
8th January 2009 3:14pm
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peter says...
adele,
didnt know wet feet can cause
brown leaves.
if you dig down 50mm or so
with your finger or stick and
it is moist then you shouldnt need to water.
a handy little gadget to have is a
moisture meter which you can get from
garden centres.
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peter30001
adelaide
8th January 2009 5:15pm
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Alison says...
John, thanks for the reply. I have followed the instructions on my Rogor tin to the letter ..... I am desperate to save a crop. However, the infestation was precisely the same as in previous years. I used Eco oil on the advice of the man from Wondawest who I advised of my problem and he said it was the go. I also had my doubts as it seems to be a treatment for the sucking insects and not the flies. I will give Fenthion a go this year. Precisely what time should I be spraying. The instructions on the Rogor are for spraying about 6 weeks prior to harvest time and then again a couple of weeks later, whereas the internet advice I have seen suggests that it should only be sprayed just prior to picking. It is a little confusing. Also, some advice I have seen on the internet suggests that the soil beneath the tree may be harbouring the flies in pupae form and that it may help to spray there. Is that correct or yet another of the internet myths. Your input on this is very much appreciated.
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alison6
Perth
9th January 2009 11:58pm
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SlickMick says...
Alison, This is from the Sipcam site on the use of Rogor. However you should read the whole instruction brochure and note the comments about the number of applications and the effect on wild life and water. http://www.sipcam.com.au/label/sipcam/ROGOR_29103022.pdf
Citrus Fruit (except Meyer
Lemons, Seville Oranges &
Queensland Fruit Fly NSW, Vic, Qld,
WA only
75mL/100 litres of
water
7 days Do not use on Meyer lemons, Seville oranges and
cumquats. Apply 2 full cover sprays 2 weeks apart 7
Cumquats) Mediterranean Fruit Fly NSW only 150mL/100 litres of
water
weeks and 5 weeks before harvest. If harvesting is
delayed a third spray may be required.
Vic, WA only 75mL/100 litres of
water
WA ONLY: Apply about 6 weeks before the fruit ripens.
Re-apply at fortnightly intervals. The past spray should
be made one week before the fruit ripens.
Aphids, Thrips All States Apply when pests appear
Bronze Orange Bug NSW, Vic, Qld,
SA, WA only
Apply when pests appear and as necessary
Wingless Grasshopper All States Apply when grasshoppers appear and re-apply as required.
In addition to the infested area spray a band of about 20
metres around the areas to be protected.
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Slicko
 
10th January 2009 6:30am
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Anonymous says...
Thats about it, Wondawest has been bust for yonks now. When did he tell you that?

Whilst eco oil is a good product, it aint EVR gonna kill fruit fly.

I spray for fruit fly at first sign of colouring up and every 2 weeks until harvest.
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10th January 2009 8:03am
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Alison says...
SlikMik, thanks for that. I remember doing the 6 and 4 week sprays and I assume I must have done the 2 week as well if these are the instructions on the tin. Still, I guess I should experiment again and see how I go. Anonymous - as I said on my first forum entry, I have been trying over several years to beat the fruit fly problem and started with the "friendly" agents first, that is traps and the Wondawest recommended oil. I bought the oil at the same time as I bought my macadamia, avocado and mango trees which would have been back in 2003/4. I still use it with complete success on citrus aphids and leaf miners.
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alison6
Perth
11th January 2009 4:34pm
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SlickMick says...
Alison, It may pay you to consider bagging your fruit if there is a real problem with spraying. I would expect that if you are spraying according to directions then you should be dealing with the FF. If not then bagging them is the alternative. I have been bagging my tomatoes for the first time this season and actually picked clean tommys for the first time in years. you can buy the bags at http://www.greenharvest.com.au/index.htm. I use the poly ones that are reuseable. I have found that GH will get your order off to you the same day.
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Slicko
 
11th January 2009 5:59pm
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SlickMick says...
Alison,
I just re-read your post. The oil will deal with the aphids and leaf miners but will never control the FF. I use the oil for whitefly and other minute insects and have found it really effective. It suffocates the insect. It cannot do this to the fruit fly as the fly is only on the fruit to lay eggs not to suck sap etc. Consequently what you use has to kill the emerging grubs and oil wont do that.
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Slicko
 
11th January 2009 6:04pm
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marc says...
Stink bugs - catch a few, crush them up until they're all juicy, leave them to strew in a little water out in the sun for a few days. crush again. seive. put liquid in some water and spray plant. the smell of death deters them. it's true.
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marc2
sydney
22nd January 2009 12:38pm
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Ellen says...
Alison,

Or you can try my fast and effective and cheap way of killing these stinky lil bugs

Get one of those insect spraying can like RAID, BAYER, in my case I've used NO FRILL brand.

wait for a calm, no rain, no wind, put up a ladder, climb up and sprays them at close range, so you don't waste unneccesary chemical

After 2-4 hours, they'd dropped like dead flies,

here's mine, I've gathered all them just to see how many of them total attacking my Tahitian Lime Tree.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Ellen
Smithfield, NSW
27th January 2009 10:36am
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Rick says...
I have a 5 year old imperial mandarin that flowers twice a year every year but the fruit drop off when they get pea size or even smaller. The leaf tips will often turn yellow as well. I have added cirtrus fertiliser in the spring and I water twice a week. Can anyone offer a suggestion?
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Rick2
Perth Australia
22nd February 2009 2:53pm
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Ellen says...
is the soil have plenty of moisture contents ? It should, watering it 2x/wk is insufficient, if soil is dry, then it cannot nurture little fruitlets into full grown fruits for you, so that's explained the drop offs.

Why don't you set up slow drippers, as irrigation system for it & plenty of mulching to keep the surface from drying out, if you wants Proper Fruiting.
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Ellen
Smithfield
26th February 2009 3:34am
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Jantina says...
I agree with Ellen , mulch, mulch ,mulch(keep it away from the trunk though).
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
26th February 2009 8:25am
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Rick says...
Thanks. I was thinking it was some form of mineral deficiency because I have a plum nearby which gets the same amount of water and that fruits very well. I will increase the watering and see how it goes.
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Perth
1st March 2009 10:57pm
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Julie says...
Hi Rick, I have a very old plum tree which gets no water at all! It fruits prolifically. Also two old apricot trees which are similiarly neglected which give me lots of fruit.

But citrus wouldn't do well with this sort of treatment.I only water twice a week, but the soil now has plenty of organic matter, after a few years of mulching with whippersnipped weeds and deciduous leaves. I feed with Dynamic Lifter and occasionally add minerals or trace elements.

Google 'citrus nutrient deficiencies pictures', to get an idea of what may be lacking.

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Julie
Roleystone
7th March 2009 8:19pm
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Rick says...
Thanks Julie. I am also in Roleystone so your hints should work fine for these trees. I have only recently started mulching the trees and have upped the water and the signs are good with a bit of new growth. Thanks for the Google tip.
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Rick2
Roleystone
20th March 2009 10:34am
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Nat says...
I have recently brought an imperial mandaring tree, not sure of the age i would think it'll be still young. I am wanting to plant it in a pot along with my placenta..anyone with any helpful hints?
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Nat3
Hamilton Hill
19th May 2009 3:37pm
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Speedy says...
Hey Nat,
Soils and potting mixes are very different.
I'd plant it in the ground.
I'm asuming that you're renting and that's the reason you want to put it in a pot, Yeah?
I planted my baby daughter's placenta in the ground, back filled it with several inches of soil then planted a silky oak on it.
My daughter just had her 1st b'day last week.
It's gotta be the greenest silky oak I've ever seen.
Very strong growth.

It'd be perfect for citrus, being gross feeders and prone to trace element deficiencies.

If a placenta can support the growth of a baby from a speck to 8-10lb,
its almost a shame to waste it on anything but a tree that'll keep giving food to the child well into adolescence.

I think in the soil would be best
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Swan Hill , Vic
26th May 2009 10:17am
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amanda says...
Speedy - u amaze me with your breadth of knowledge - as usual :) I spent 3 yrs of research on placentae at King Eddies' in Perth - often I could not obtain them because of religious beliefs (muslims bury them facing east) and many other customs. I was thinking that it would get pretty 'mucky' in a pot - but Nat - you could always keep it frozen, until you can do what u aspire to with it?
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amanda19
 
30th May 2009 8:38pm
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Shaun says...
I harvested about a dozen fruits from my Miho mandarin tree in early May ....
the fruits ere reasonably large, and easy to peel, and seedless of course .....
and the flavour was suuupeerrb !!!
Yuuuummmmm !!!
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WA ? Perth
5th June 2009 5:38pm
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amanda says...
Hi Shaun - where did u get the Miho? Does it have that mandarin 'tang' or is it just really sweet?
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
8th June 2009 12:06am
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Barry says...
I will soon be moving to a new home with a much smaller garden area than I have at present . To what size do the Satsuma Mandarins grow - height and width ? And which is best for the warm and humid summer we have here , or is another variety preferable ?
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Barry3
Beenleigh , Qld
8th June 2009 7:45am
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Shaun says...
Hi Amanda,
I got my Miho from Bunnings in Cannington (opposite carousel Shopping Center).
I think you can get them from Bunnings in Geraldton too .... saw them there the last time I visitef Geraldton (18 month ago !!! .... LOL).
Miho is really sweet .... almost acidless ...... My friends said it may have a bit of a tang if I harvest them before they get fully ripe on the tree.
If you want Mandarin with a bit of a tang, try other varieties (such as Hickson?).
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WA / Perth
15th June 2009 9:30pm
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Shaun says...
Hi Barry,
The eventual size of your satsuma orange is also determined by the rootstock onto which it is budded.
If you have Flying Dragon rootstock, then it will be dwarfed .... approx 1.0 - 1.5 m ....
Other types of rootstock will make it grow bigger (look up info in citrus rootstocks).
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WA / Perth
15th June 2009 9:35pm
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Simon says...
i have some new shoots growing from a young mandarine tree. On the shoots they have big sharp thorns on them , should i cut these suckers back or leave them to grow
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Simon6
Wellard
5th July 2009 10:57am
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Julie says...
Are the new shoots growing from below the graft? I would definitely cut them off - mandarins aren't supposed to have thorns!
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Roleystone WA
5th July 2009 7:05pm
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Mark says...
Hi Shaun,
I have had some great fruit from my satsuma mandarins as well. I planted 3 at my school and the kids love them! No seeds to worry about and easy to peel. Very sweet. Have kids who don't like fruit eating them and wanting more! They are only a metre high which makes them easy to care for.
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Mark5
Blacktown
10th July 2009 9:52am
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amanda says...
Mark - that's a really wonderful idea about planting fruit trees at school! good on you! I might see the gardner at my daughters school about that idea. :)
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amanda19
geraldton.WA
10th July 2009 11:49am
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Jim says...
In my garden I have the following mandarin trees:Imperial,Emperor,Hickson,Pixie,Topaz/Ortanique,HoneyMurcott,Afourer,Daisy,Eloise,Ellendale,Aperino,Kara,Clementines(Nules,Oroval,Merisol),Satsumas(Okitsu,Silverhill,Miho,JapaneseSeedless.
Will try to grow Monarch and TaylorLee from seeds.
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Jim11
Nedlands WA
12th July 2009 2:07am
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Simon says...
Thanks for your reply Julie ,The shoots with the thorns on them are above the graft,,, so you think i should cut them
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Simon6
Wellard
15th July 2009 6:14pm
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Simon says...
I have 5 fingers of banannas growing on my tree, should i cut them down as well as the tree or will the fruit come good
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Simon6
Wellard
15th July 2009 6:16pm
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Rach says...
Just moved into a new home which has a mandarine tree in the back yard, no idea what type butt and I'm not much of a green thumb. As the fruit is droppin' off the tree is this a sign to pick them? There some really large ones and I'm eating a "normal size" one now, very juicy but not sweet, been off the tree for couple of weeks - Help will be much too appreciated.
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Rach
QLD
17th July 2009 11:29am
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Jim says...
Mandarins do not get any sweeter once off the tree.Depending on variety,some can stay on tree longer without loosing flavour.In my backyard,Hickson,Emperor, Daisy mandarins and Seminole Tangeloes are ripening;also find TaylorLee and Monarch(both large fruits) are now available in supermarkets.They generally do not keep well for long. Yes pluck them now,and juicing them is a good alternative.
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Jim12
Nedlands WA
19th July 2009 12:59am
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randey says...
one other thing to keep in mind is that as soon as any citrus fruit is picked its vitamin c content diminishes very rapidly, so if you want to utilise this vitamin it is advisable to eat it straight off the tree. by the time that you eat a store bought fruit the vitamins are almost depleted. orange juice in cartons has vit c added.
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randey
perth
19th July 2009 10:35am
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randey says...
hi simon, you dont say what size your bananas are. if they are about normal ie they look full of flesh there are two ways. one is to bag them on the plant or cut them off on the bunch and bag them, both times using a black plastic garbage bag. ripening bananas give off ethylene gas so that when you bag them you keep the gas in the bag which in turn encourages ripening. also handy to keep in mind that if you have any kind of unripe fruit that placing them in a bag with ripening bananas will enhance the the ripening process. hopr this helps
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randey
perth
19th July 2009 10:45am
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WALLY says...
I have a double grafted Mandarin [imperial & Emperor].... It has been in for nearly 2 years - about 5 foot high with many branches [looks too many to me] How do I determine which I should prune out & when... For interest I have 1 piece Mandarin on the whople tree which is ripening nicely -Whoopee.. I appreciate some ones help
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Glen3
Adelaide
20th July 2009 5:34pm
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amanda says...
Hi wally - if u could post a photo it might help...it might be ok? try not to let the middle get too crowded and prune off anything below 80-100cm - the branches will end up on the ground when they do fruit and it will be hard to get under them to work.
I had to learn pruning out of books...but after 3 yrs I am finding it easier and more natural now. Decide which branches u want to keep for the future and which would become a good 'leader' branch...that's as far as I have got with my citrus in 3 yrs - so someone else will have to take over from me here!? :)

2 yrs is still young - be patient. I have two x2 yr old mandarins (an emperor and imperial!)- 3kg off one this yr and zero off the other! They are treated exactly the same - but the other will be ready in it's own time i think..
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
20th July 2009 11:18pm
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kyp says...
can anyone advise of a mandarine that is available that doesn't fruit the same time asan Imperial or Emperor?
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kyp
adelaide
19th August 2009 9:31pm
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amanda says...
Kyp - my advice is - don't get an emporer.. they r a dud...!
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
19th August 2009 11:33pm
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jimbo says...
Daisy and Hickson,both ripen into August,free from fruit fly attack!Daisy is my favourite...I've got 23 growing around my house,from full sun to part shade.The part-shaded daisy has smaller fruits,but has very intense,sweet ,complex taste.Also fruits stay on tree longer! Third one is the HoneyMurcott,that's ripening now,and into November.Unfortunately,rats love the HM(and the Seminole tangelo).Hickson and HM trees are easy to find,not so the Daisy(Mitre10 in Balcatta,WA,still stocking quite a few)
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wa
22nd August 2009 11:16pm
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amanda says...
I just bought Daisy mandarins at shop yesterday - they are superb! Thanks for info Jimbo - I am off to Perth next week so I will pull up the emporer and put in a Daisy! Leave a tree for me guys! :)))
You can string up Talon baits in the tree for the rats? I tried this for my passionfruit - worked a treat.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
23rd August 2009 11:58am
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Mark says...
Hi Kip....

Try a Satsuma - one of the seedless Japanese mandarines. I put in 3 trees at my school. We started picking in June. They are lovely and sweet.
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Mark5
Blacktown
23rd August 2009 6:18pm
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jimbo says...
Amanda
Correction. It's Maylands's mitre10/Ross's
Corner Railway pde/tenth ave
Their horticulturist comes on a Satday.She can order more Daisys if run out.The daisys I grow myself taste 5x better than ones from shop.IMO,Daisy mandarin beats all other types hands down.I should know...I've got 13 other varieties as well.Good luck in your hunt.
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nedlands wa
24th August 2009 9:33am
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jimbo says...
Mark
Your sure you've a satsuma?
They are early ripers,like from March in WA.I've got 4 varieties of satsuma(miho,silverhill,okitsu,japanese seedless) ,and their season finished months ago. Cheers.
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nedlands wa
24th August 2009 12:46pm
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Lyndall says...
Hi, I have just recently planted a hickson mandarin. It is only very young about 1 - 1.5m tall and just one stem. It is just about to flower, but because it is so young and skinny should i pick the flowers off so it dosnt fruit. I dont want the fruit to be too heavy for it!
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Lyndall
Brisbane
25th August 2009 2:51pm
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jimbo says...
Lyndall,
First fruits should be allowed to mature at 3-4 years. Before that,they are best removed when small to avoid overtaxing the tree and stunting it's early growth.
The Hickson needs detailed pruning in the early years to separate the branches. It is prone to bad crotch angles and susceptible to limb splitting under crop load if the main branches are not staggered.
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nedlands wa
25th August 2009 11:28pm
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Lyndall says...
Great thanx jimbo!

So do I take the flowers off until the tree is around three years old, or do you mean take the fruit off before it is too big?

Sorry I think i just confused myself!
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Lyndall
Brisbane
27th August 2009 1:20pm
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jimbo says...
Some flowers/fruits will fall off spontaneously.Remove fruits when pea size.Maybe save one or two to mature...make sure you stake the branch where the fruit hangs to avoid branch split.Personally though,I've never culled my trees,even when very young.I let them go feral!No damage done,imo,and they are all thriving!It's up to you.Good luck.
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nedlands wa
27th August 2009 6:56pm
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Mark says...
Hi jimbo....yes they are satsuma. 2 x miho and 1 x japanese seedless. I have a Japanese Seedless at home in Blacktown in a large pot. Put it in about 6 months ago. Is just flowering now and like you, I don't bother picking off the fruit when young. Natural selection makes the weakest fall off.
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Mark5
Blacktown
6th September 2009 2:34pm
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Chris says...
Jimbo,
What are your thoughts on the afourer murcott mandarin?
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Chris
Sydney
6th September 2009 8:16pm
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jimbo says...
Chris,some info here:

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&source=hp&q=afourer+mandarin&meta=&aq=0&oq=afourer&fp=b3f4fa2221e1a36c

Afourer is considered by some to be one of the most promising new varieties worldwide.Maturing testing at West Gingin,WA,shows that it reaches the required 8:1 brix/acid ratio in early Julybut doesn't reach its peak until late August.It develops a highly attractive deep orange color and is easy to peal.It has good flavour with acceptable but not excessive acid. It is medium sized but can crop heavily in some years requiring thinning. Altho' seedless if grown in isolation it can be quite seedy when grown in mixed planting's.It was originally anticipated that this variety would mature late enough to replace Murcott in WA Testing has shown that this is not the case as it matures well before Mystique and Murcott. Some trial planting's of Afourer have recently been established by local indusry(Farmnote,Dept of Agriculture and Food,July 2006)
They are currently available in supermarkets.I've 2 growing in my garden.Taste not as good as Daisy,imo
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Nedlands WA
7th September 2009 7:18pm
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jimbo says...
For those that like to look at pictures of citrus fruits:

http://www.australiancitrusgrowers.com.au/aspdev/resources/varieties.asp
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Nedlands WA
7th September 2009 7:51pm
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Chris says...
Thanks Jimbo.
I am aware of both Google search(!) and the Aust Citrus Growers site which is very good.
Just wanted an opinion from a home gardener who has grown the variety.
I was intending to plant one, but excessive seediness deterred me.
Do you find your Daisy is quite seedy, when planted with other citrus?
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Chris
Sydney
7th September 2009 10:19pm
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jimbo says...
Got fruits from 7 daisy plants this year...not many seeds in the fruits at all.Because they are picked fresh,they taste better than the supermarket ones.
Plant one,and tell us about it in years to come.I have 23 daisys in my garden...citrus tragic really. Cheers.
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Nedlands WA
7th September 2009 11:12pm
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amanda says...
Hi Chris - the Daisy mandarins I bought from the shop were not overly seedy - and the best mandarin I have had in ages! I read somewhere that keeping mandarin trees well away from each other helps to reduce seediness..I didn't know about other citrus tho' - can oranges etc - increase seediness too?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
8th September 2009 9:21am
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wendy says...
Scott All citrus like to be on a mound they do not like to sit in the flat ground unless the drainage is superb. I have built 3 mounds and have one lemon and 2 mandarins. They are looking very good but so are the citrus in pots as they have no saucers and therefore great drainage. Hope this helps.Happy gardening.
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wendyBellbirdPark1
ipswich
8th September 2009 11:17am
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amanda says...
Hey Chris - Woolies had Afourer mandarins in today so I got some to try.. they are absolutely beautiful!!! only a cupla seeds in each fruit (so far ...I am working my way thru them!) They are on a par with Daisy (by my tastebuds...) less seeds, but I think they are more complex and fragrant..anyway - I will be on the lookout for both a Daisy and an Afourer in future!
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
11th September 2009 2:56pm
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Chris says...
I bought some of Afourer a couple of weeks back and my partner and I both loved them. Compared to the Daisy (which I've only tried from the shops!), I personally liked the Afourer better. Each to their own.
Compared to the latter Murcott (Honey), they are also less seedy and easier to peel.
The big issue with Daisy is unless it is isolated, it is very seedy.
Until very recently...so I might wait a few years for the seedless variety to arrive here.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090804174729.htm
There is also a seedless Afourer (Delite), but it is trademarked, so may not see the variety in a nursery for quite some time.
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Chris
Sydney
14th September 2009 10:13pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th September 2009 10:17pm
Liz says...
We recently planted a mandarin tree in our garden - it was looking great for a few weeks, but now it's dropping all its leaves! No bugs apparent. I gave it a dose of seasol a couple of days ago, but the leaves are still falling. It's spring time, it's getting plenty of water (too much?) What could be the problem? Position? Soil? Nearby planting? We live 5 mins from the beach - could it be too salty in this area?
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Liz9
Melbourne
22nd September 2009 8:32am
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Chris says...
hard to say without a photo, but a dose of iron chelates may help.
The iron stops the leaves from yellowing and dropping off.
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Chris
Sydney
23rd September 2009 1:17pm
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Julie says...
I bought Honey Murcott mandarins the other day, just to try. Quite disappointed - very hard to peel, a bit fibrous, and not the intense mandarin taste I am used to from my old-fashioned Imperials.

Of course, it may be hard to tell, as each grower treat their trees differently. The Daisy sure sounds good though!

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Roleystone WA
25th September 2009 8:23pm
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Adam says...
Honey Murcotts basically fill a gap production, in themselves they are not so great, unless you like quite sour fruit. Unfortunately in Australia "Mandarin" is used to refer to spectrum of different species and hybrids with very different taste and growth characteristics. I prefer Satsumas "Citrus unshiu" and Mediterranean mandarin "Citrus deliciosa", as they both produce sweet highly aromatic fruit which peel easily. In the case of the Satsuma no pips either.
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Adam
Melbourne
25th September 2009 10:16pm
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Chris says...
I have to take exception with your ill-informed comments Adam.
Perhaps Honey Murcotts are sour grown in Melbourne, but when grown in the right climate and mature they are a juicy SWEET fruit, hence the name. In fact, some fruit maturing late in the season, can be too sweet.
I disagree with you comment about just filling in a gap in production too. They are a late season mandarin, one of the last variety to mature and the second most widely grown in Australia. And in fact, they are heavily exported to Asia because of the flavour, which is very much in demand.
Julie: A good honey murcott is delicious. Yes, they are generally harder to peel and can be more seedy. And the taste is different to the Imperial, because it is believed the variety originated from a mandarin crossed with a sweet orange.
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Chris
Sydney
26th September 2009 9:35am
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Liz says...
After the dose of seasol our Imperial mandarin tree appears to be sprouting new leaves. Hooray! The ones that fell off didn't turn yellow, they just literally went from healthy to dropping off. Does that mean it's not an iron problem? Would iron chelates be a good idea anyway?
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Liz9
Melbourne
26th September 2009 10:58am
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Adam says...
Chris you can take excetion all you like, sadly that's your choice. Not quite sure why you would assume that a fruit consumed in Melbourne is going to be produced in Melbourne, especially since you seen keen to use emotive words like "ill informed"?

When more late season varieties of Mandarin (and hybrids) are released, I guess we will see just how delicious they turn out to be.
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Adam
Melbourne
26th September 2009 5:01pm
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Chris says...
Well I've never heard of honey murcotts being described as sour. Are you sure you weren't eating a lemon?
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Chris
Sydney
26th September 2009 5:39pm
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Wayne says...
Honey Murcotts are grown extensively west of us out near Emerald and they can be sour at times for sure. I think they're probably picked to early, so I shy away from them now.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
26th September 2009 5:51pm
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Julie says...
I bought some honey murcotts last week and they are quite sour too. I don't know why it has the name 'honey'?
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26th September 2009 6:35pm
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Chris says...
Sure most fruit picked early, not fully ripe could be sour. Goes without saying. But that's an issue with the commercial producer not the variety. Grow your own and find out for yourself. Or have a look on the my edibles link of those who are actually growing it.
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Chris
Sydney
26th September 2009 6:49pm
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Original Post was last edited: 26th September 2009 7:29pm
jimbo says...
Chris is correct.
I have 3 H.Murcotts grown in part shade.Last year they were on the sour side.This year,all 3 are very sweet,straight off the trees,beginning in Sept.Still some left.Gave them more water last summer,and fertilised with Npk Blue,Sheep poo,Dynamic lifter,blood/bone,and trace elements.Add some potassium sulphate may help sweeten your fruits a bit more.
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Nedlands WA
26th September 2009 8:50pm
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Wayne says...
" Subject
sweet citrus

Remark
Hi Tom, Love your show. How do I sweeten my oranges and mandarins. They usually are slightly sour and acid to eat.

Comment on this message

Comments
Mix 60gms of Magnesium sulphate 30 mls wetting agent spray foliage and fruit twice weekly for three weeks. Also apply Magnesium sulphate to the soil under the canopy one clenched handful per sq metre. [ He usually stipulates 4.5L water]
xxxxxxxxxxxxx

Tom Wyatt has a gardening Q & A show on ABC radio and has plenty of knoweldge
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
27th September 2009 6:16am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th September 2009 6:22am
amanda says...
The NSW DPI suggests this about acidity in citrus:

Low phosphorus affects fruit quality, causing misshapen fruit with open centres and coarse, thickened rinds. The fruit is pulpy and has a low juice percentage, and the juice is acidic. The quantity of total soluble solids (sugar content) of the juice is usually not affected. The effect of phosphorus deficiency on fruit quality is worse when too much nitrogen fertiliser has been used. A balanced supply of nitrogen and phosphorus gives both a high yield and good fruit quality.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
27th September 2009 10:52am
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Mark says...
I have just picked the last of my Honey Murcotts and they are sweet and juicy. Yes the skin is tight but not difficult to remove. Last year's fruit was a bit tart but I put that down to the drought. This year the trees have had more consistant watering.
However my favourite mandarin would have to be the Satsuma
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Mark5
Blacktown
27th September 2009 12:13pm
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karen says...
Have been reading all of your posts and I guess that all mandarins are a bit of a personal choice thing.. I'm a bit of a sweet and tangy person.. and prefer the ones without seeds.. So as I understand it, the Japanese seedless tend to not have much tang? And the USA brands are a bit more tangy? Does anyone have an opinion about the Nules Clementine? How does the clementine flavour compare with the Daisy?
Keen to buy a tree soon, so hoping to make a decision. Any suggestions?
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karen7
Bundeena
2nd October 2009 2:55pm
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jimbo says...
Karen,try this site,posted b4:
http://www.australiancitrusgrowers.com.au/aspdev/resources/varieties.asp
I like them both.Nules is a early riper,and tends to get fruitfly attack in my garden,apparently the best of all the clementines.Daisy? I've got more than 20...say no more.
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Nedlands WA
2nd October 2009 7:58pm
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Anthony says...
When can I prune my tree?
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Anthony5
Dallas
24th October 2009 2:39am
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Julie says...
Anthony,after fruiting, when the weather has warmed up a bit, seems to be the general idea. If you prune heavily you may not get a crop next year, but they will soon catch up.

Citrus are not pruned regularly like deciduous fruit, but a bit of shaping is OK. Removing dead wood is what you are supposed to do fairly often.

I have a cumquat which has not fruited for 2 or 3 years. I think I will prune it back hard to try and rejuvenate it, then give it a good feed. Citrus are pretty tough.
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Roleystone WA
29th October 2009 4:22pm
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juanita says...
I inherited a small grafted Emperor Mandarin tree w/c i planted in the ground & it's growing nicely w/ lots of new leaf buds...What the fruits gonna be like, sweet or sour, easy to peel, big or small?
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melbourne
28th December 2009 3:21pm
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Julie says...
juanita, if you look back to earlier posts you will see that amanda and I both give Emperor the thumbs down. I wouldn't say the fruit is sour, but I just didn't like the flavour. A bit bland too.

They are easy to peel, and about average size - probably bigger if you thin the fruit.

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Roleystone WA
28th December 2009 4:05pm
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amanda says...
Hey jaunita, Julie ... I am waiting for my Imperial mandarins to see what they are like - if they are tasty n ok - then I am pulling the Emperor out. Mine were juicy n fine (not sour) but just had no "character" in the flavour. Bland is how I would describe them too.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
28th December 2009 6:55pm
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juanita says...
I didn't expect the fruits (emperor) aren't that much good to eat?...I might still keep the tree for shade.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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melbourne
30th December 2009 1:49am
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amanda says...
Hi jaunita - you can always juice them and mix with something more flavoursome. You may have more luck in your climate - stranger things have happened! :-))
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
31st December 2009 11:59am
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juanita says...
Hi Amanda,
That's what i intend to do..It would be a flavoursome drinks w/c will be made out of the ff fruits i have in the garden, grapefruits, lemonades,limes,lemon & emperor mandarins( 1 yr to go).
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melbourne
2nd January 2010 6:15pm
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amanda says...
Hi jaunita - happy 2010. We had a massive oversupply of lemons n limes last season so hubby juiced them all and froze into ice cube trays - I only just finished them last month! And the new crop nearly ready. Amazing what 2 trees can give u!? you can freeze OJ too (if u get a glut)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
2nd January 2010 9:01pm
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Ann says...
I have a very old mandarin tree that we always thought was as old as the house (95 yrs). But now I am not so sure. It is very big and has always fruited. Last year it had an amazing amount of fruit - now it has fruited again too early but branches are dying and apart from the fruit it is looking very sad. How long do these trees normally last?
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Ann2
Sydney
2nd January 2010 9:33pm
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amanda says...
Hi Ann - have you been feeding it? Citrus are very hungry trees and like their water too. They love their nitrogen fixes.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
3rd January 2010 12:37am
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Graham says...
I have an imperial mandarin tree that is dropping it's green fruit that is just starting to turn yellow when it is the size of a ping pong ball or smaller. Does anyone know the cause of this? Is it the dry weather of Nov/Dec and then lots of rain? Or possibly a pest/disease? Thanks!
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Graham2
Maryborough Qld
20th February 2010 10:00am
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chris says...
Graham, possible that the heavy rain has been the cause. It may, depending on your soil, have leeched out many nutrients. Whatever the cause, fruit drop is a sign the tree is under stress. Could also be a trace element deficiency. A complete fertiliser should contain trace elements, otherwise apply it once a year to the tree.
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Chris
 
28th February 2010 10:07pm
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Original Post was last edited: 28th February 2010 10:08pm
Chris says...
One other cause just came to mind: citrus scab will cause fruit drop. It mostly affects lemons though can occur in mandarins. It is a fungus that
affects leaves, branches and fruit. a copper spray is the treatment if that is what you have.
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Chris
 
28th February 2010 11:16pm
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Gail says...
Does anyone know how to prune a Yosemite Gold Manarin tree. Or how to tell a branch from a sucker???
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Gail1
OC,CA
20th April 2010 3:15am
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Steve says...
I have an imperial mandarin in a large pot. I want to plant it in the ground and the spot I have is right next to my house (About 1/2 a metre from it). Does anyone know if mandarins or other citrus have invasive roots that would undermine my footings or house wall. The site is in full sun so I think it would do well.
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Steve17
Port Macquarie NSW
4th May 2010 12:15pm
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John I says...
Hi Steve, citrus have a fairly shallow fibrous root system, but it will extend out proportionately to the tree size. Personally I think 1/2 a metre is to close unless your mandarin is on dwarf root stock. If the tree gets to about 3 metres hight I would expect the roots to extend out about 2 to 3 metres, and teh tree itself will be around 2.5 to 3 meters wide.
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JohnI
Melbourne
4th May 2010 12:32pm
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Steve says...
Thanks for the info. Maybe I should look at a dwarf variety. The spot I had is pretty close to my vege beds as well so I imagine the roots would probably spread into there. I didn't realise they got to 3 meters in height so maybe I should keep it in the pot. I get a fair bit of fruit off it anyway in the pot.
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Port Macquarie NSW
4th May 2010 3:58pm
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PF says...
Scott I have one Navel which is one year old and NOTHING. I am very disappointed. The leaves are still green but no new leaves nor growth. It is still 1 metre from the time I purchased and planted it. Wondering what I am doing wrong.. I live in a heavy clay area. How did you get them flowering so well? I have also now bought an Imperial Mandarin but not yet taken it out of its pot. If root rot, how can I save it? Much thanks
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Sydney
10th May 2010 11:11pm
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Rhys says...
PF, your situation sounds very similar to mine. I've had two citrus in the ground for about 7 months, and no new growth at all. I'm actually thinking of digging them up and putting them back in pots. The fact that yours are in clay i think confirms my suspicions that poor drainage is the issue. I also have clay, and i thought i had prepared the sit OK, but given the lack of growth, and now your similar story, i think a raised garden bed is the only way to go. How long have other people waited for new growth after planting citrus out?
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Getafix
Newcastle
11th May 2010 10:14am
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John says...
It took my orange and imperial a couple of years to get them growing. They only started to grow when I gave them lots of citrus fertilizer, water and mulch heavily. BTW, undernearth my soil is very clayey.

The Meyer lemon tree has had less fruits every year since I bought it. The nextdoor neibough chopped her big tree off few months ago and mine has started to flower heavily. So it could be the shade contributed to productive of the tree.
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Sydney
13th May 2010 9:33am
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bob says...
na mate your wrong
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18th May 2010 7:58pm
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bob says...
oh ya plant growing people
people
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18th May 2010 8:07pm
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rock says...
can someone help? i planted an emperial mandarin last year and this autumn the leaves started to shrink(probably 1 third to what they should be)What could it be. I fertilised added potting mix, watered??? i cant work it out
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19th May 2010 8:36am
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amanda says...
Hi rock - zinc deficiency will produce "little leaf" syndrome - but a photo would really help as there are other symptoms associated with this.
U say u added potting mix - to the ground or a pot?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
19th May 2010 9:01pm
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chris says...
For those who have clay you are wasting your time and money, unless you plant the tree on a raised mound. The mound should be a friable loam soil, not just clay soil raised up. A young tree will struggle and slowly die with the clay. The drainage will be a problem and the roots will struggle. Once established citrus can tolerate clay.
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sydney
20th May 2010 4:09pm
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Rhys says...
Thanks Chris...that's pretty much my conclusion with the citrus at my place. I'm hoping i'll have time to dig them up and put them in pots this weekend before preparing a raised bed and replanting them out sometime time in the future.

Encouraging to hear they will tolerate clay once established...does that mean if i grew them up in pots for a couple of years, i could then put them into clay soil, or more that if you put them in a raised bed, then as they grow, if the roots grow down into the clay they will be OK by then?
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Getafix
Newcastle
20th May 2010 9:08pm
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bob says...
hi
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23rd May 2010 4:17pm
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bob says...
whats the best time to grow a mandarin tree
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23rd May 2010 4:19pm
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rock says...
thx amanda.ill post a photo soon and in the mean time ill zinc it up! yeh i added a general potting mix in the soil to help with drainage.I can grow all trees except citrus.could it be due to my clay soil?
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23rd May 2010 9:32pm
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amanda says...
Hi rock - chris mentions something about clay above. I have sandy soil - so I can't help u much with clay. What's it's pH?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
24th May 2010 4:39pm
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Gail says...
HELP!!!!!!! I am still looking for some info. on how to tell a branch from a sucker on my Yosemite Gold Mandarin. At the tips of some of the branches, I have 4-5 new branches coming out at once. This tree has me really going in circles. I finely got some mandarin's growing. Only to end up the size of a pea and turned black. HELP!!!!!
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Gail1
OC, Ca
29th May 2010 4:03pm
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john says...
Hi,

I think its time for some photos, Also is the new growth above the graft?
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bayswater
29th May 2010 9:45pm
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jimbo says...
For anyone interested in an old variety,there's one Dancy mandarin tree with fruit,left at Wandilla,Lesmurdie.
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Nedlands WA
19th June 2010 1:58pm
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Dale says...
I have a number of Imperial maderin tree and in years gone by, have got reasonable fruit from them. This last season however the fruit has been dry and woody.... Any ideas???
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Dale1
Brisbane
12th September 2010 9:03pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Dale,
Sounds like your soil is lacking Boron.
Try giving it some boron, sulphate of potash fertilizer, and some epsom salts.

Mulch the tree (if it's not already), out to the drip-line, but keep it away from the trunk.

To speed thing up, try spraying with boron and a 'good' wetting agent, say twice a week for four weeks.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
13th September 2010 7:24am
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Caroline says...
I used Australian gardener citrus fruit fertiliser. I had amazing number of fruits healthy and sweet. The last few fruits I plucked only yesterday. Now the tree looks unhealthy with small with yellow spots. I have applied the same fertiliser now. Should watch whether it picks up its healthy look. Can any suggest any other means to feed the tree?
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21st September 2010 10:31am
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Caroline says...
I used Australian gardener citrus fruit fertiliser. I had amazing number of fruits healthy and sweet. The last few fruits I plucked only yesterday. Now the tree looks unhealthy with small with yellow spots. I have applied the same fertiliser now. Should watch whether it picks up its healthy look. Can any suggest any other means to feed the tree?
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21st September 2010 10:32am
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Paula says...
Dekka - or anyone? I'm in California, have two MATURE tangerines, they bore plentifully when we moved in...but now fruit is uniformly dry and pulpy on BOTH trees. Used an all-purpose citrus food (good brand, but I don't remember the name) and they seemed to go bad after that -- or maybe, as new "owners" we're not watering them enough, or watering them too much? Any ideas? Sad to see such great-looking fruit be dry and inedible. Thanks!
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Paula3
Santa Monica, CA
24th September 2010 6:27pm
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amanda says...
Paula - try some trace elements with a decent level of boron (speak to a good/reputable rural supplier/Nursery, agronomist etc - in your area)

Not sure how hot your summers are - but if really hot and dry - then u need to water - frequently - especially if u have sandy/light soil and hot dry winds?

We have 38 degrees C ++ regularly (not sure in F? Why didn't the US convert to metric!!?? grr!) :) I am actually going to chuck some light shade cloth over my mandarin tree this summer (it "fills out" the fruit in our worst heat - whereas the one that fills out in autumn is fine and bursting with juice)
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
24th September 2010 8:52pm
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Glen says...
I have a mandarin tree grafted with two different mandarins - It is approx 3.5 years old - Probably 7-8Ft high - Good new growth & appears healthy.
Last year unbelievable quantity of fruit both styles - This year very disappointing crop probably 12 mandarin only. We have had very strange weather this year.. A cool & wet summer could this be the cause. I fertalised in line with recommendation.
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Glen3
Australia
12th April 2011 12:01pm
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Caroline says...
Hi. We have moved into a house with a mature mandarin tree (about 3.5m tall), with lots of fruit. The fruit itself is now ripe, and is lovely, juicy and sweet. My problem is, the pith around the segments is very tough. You literally have to peel each segment with a knife, as you can't chew through it. I have no idea what variety it is - it has seeds, and a thin, tight skin. The fruit is lovely, so its worth the battle to eat it, but I'm wondering if there is something we can do to prevent it being this tough for next season.
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Caroline3
Brisbane, Australia
22nd June 2011 1:28pm
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Wayne says...
Hello Carolyn
Brisbane = Mature Mandarin with tight skin and tough pith = could it be Ellendale? = pretty popular tree around Brisbane years back?

If it were mine I would water in [drench the soil] a table spoon of Boron [borax] to 9 litres of water under the canopy. Perhaps even spray the tree with the same solution. It will take about two weeks to work, are
we to late if I am correct.

If you go this way will you please let us know the result
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Wayne
 
22nd June 2011 5:54pm
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Mike says...
Ellendales and honey murcots are actually tangors being a cross of mandarin and orange.I have both are not easy to peel, skin is tough and thin, the section walls are not like that.The only citrus you peel each section for is pommelo.
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Cairns
22nd June 2011 6:58pm
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Wayne says...
By memory we had the choice of Emperor or Ellendale only many years ago Mike. I can remember my Dad ordering fruit trees by post and they arrived by train, from where I have no idea but there were no nurseries around to visit where we were
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Wayne
 
23rd June 2011 6:28am
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Caroline says...
Thanks guys. I will try the Borax today - There are still 50 or so that are a touch green, so I might be lucky. Here are some I picked this morning - if you look really closely you can see they have a very faint spotting on the skin - these spots darken once they are off the tree for a week or so.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Caroline3
Brisbane, Australia
23rd June 2011 10:10am
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Wayne says...
They look more like a Murcot to me but I could be wrong, nice looking fruit just the same
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Wayne
 
23rd June 2011 11:58am
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd June 2011 4:49pm
Mike says...
My murcots never get as orange and nice looking as that.My emperors are large and loose skinned with a good flavour.They have always been the variety of choice around here.The pictured ones also look a bit like hickson.
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Cairns
23rd June 2011 4:34pm
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Scott says...
G'day all,
was just searching for pruning a mandarin tree and found my original post from years ago, wow there is some good info here. An update on my tree they have produced a fantastic crop this year, my trees are now 3 years old, I havent had any problems with the grass under the trees, although i always make sure i dont wipper snip near the trunk and always keep it trimmed nice and low.
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oakhurst
12th July 2011 6:37pm
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Shaun says...
I got a bumper crop from my varigated kumquat this year. Had been having 'freshly squeeze' kumquat juice for breaky the past month, and lots of Traditional Thai cooking that use fresh kumquat juice (salads, etc).
Managed to Google some recipe to preserve the excess, so I ended up with 4 large jar of preserved kumquat (different recipes: 2 different sweet preserves, 1 savory preserve, and 1 traditional Thai spicy preserve).
Will post in a couple of weeks time when they are ready for tastings.
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WA / Perth
30th July 2011 3:18pm
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Caroline says...
Hi Wayne & Mike! I picked the last of my mandarins this morning. No noticeable improvement in the toughness of the pith yet, but still worth the effort as they are the tastiest mandarins I've ever eaten! Will give the tree some love and attention over the next 6 months, and maybe give the borax another go come March/April/May next year. How often do you think I should use it? Thanks guys -your advice is appreciated, as a mandarin growing newbie I really have no idea!
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Caroline3
Brisbane
25th August 2011 10:40am
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ing says...
how do i REDUCE THE THICKNESS OF THE RIND.
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ing
 
3rd September 2011 8:05pm
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Mike says...
Ing,it doesn't always pay to have a thin skin.Within varieties skin is usually thicker in cooler parts of their 'climate envelope' and you can't do too much about it.If they have a good range of fertlisers and lots of water the fruit are bigger and the proportion of skin to flesh is reduced.
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Cairns
3rd September 2011 8:42pm
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Chris says...
The major influence on rind thickness are 1) the rootstock and 2) nutrition
Most would have no idea what rootstock their citrus are on because nurseries/big box stores have never had to specify the information on the tag. But certain rootstock are known to produce fruit with thick rinds. They are used because they have other positive traits.
Nutrition imbalance, particular excess Nitrogen, will all other factors aside, produce fruit with thick rinds.
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Chris
Sydney
3rd September 2011 10:16pm
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Brendan says...
ing, to reduce the thickness of the rind, give it extra sulphate of potash.
Handful/sq m under the canopy spread. I'd spray the tree with liquid potash as well.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
4th September 2011 6:45am
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Mike says...
I'm glad Chris and Brendan came to the rescue with good nutrition advice with respect to citrus skins and rootstock influence.All my references talk about N and K effects and it all came flooding back when I read your responses.
By the way all my citrus are either in full flower or just completing flowering now.
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Cairns
4th September 2011 8:22pm
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ing says...
thanks Chris very helpful.
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5th September 2011 9:45pm
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Lib says...
What an amazing site. I have learned so much reading thru. I am wondering if any of the Japanese variety will grow on the mid north coast? Where do they usually fruit the best? The only other variety I was interested in was a Hickson. Will they bare on the coast? We get a lot of humidity Jan. Feb. Mar. Any information will be appreciated. Thanks
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Lib
Forster
24th September 2011 12:17pm
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Tracey says...
I have a madarin tree that is abubdant with fruit but they are sour and hard to peel, Q. Is there anything I can give the tree to sweeten the fruit? Thanks
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Tracey
Thames Coast, Thames ,North Island ,New Zealand
5th October 2011 11:24am
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Brendan says...
Hi Tracey,
Try giving it some Magnesium Sulphate (Epsom Salts), handful per sq m under the canopy. Also give it some Sulphate of Potash at the same rate, and water this in.

Then mix 30g Epsom Salts in 9 litres water, add a good wetting agent, and spray the tree twice a week for 4 weeks, that will help sweeten the fruit already on the tree.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
6th October 2011 8:00am
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Tracey says...
Cheers ,thanks for that brendan
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Tracey
Thames Coast, Thames ,North Island ,New Zealand
11th October 2011 4:13pm
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Laura says...
Can anyone give me a suggestion. I have a Satsuma Mandarian that is 3 years old. The only thing growing on it is the 3 to 4 thorn branches that are coming out from under the leaf branch that produces the fruit. The plant started about 2 feet tall, the thorns are now about 7 ft. What do I do? It put out about 20 fruit first year, second year they all dropped off, I think because we had a dry summer/winter the previous year. The leaves look good and green. Am I supposed to prune or cut back the thorny branches?
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Laura4
Mobile, AL USA
29th December 2011 6:02am
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Brendan says...
Hi Laura,
Would you know if the 'thorn branches' are growing from below the graft? If so, cut them off.
If not, you can prune them back to a suitable size. Btw, we call them 'water shoots' here.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
29th December 2011 8:14am
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Laura says...
Thanks for the info Brendan! I did look and although they are below the main leaf branch that produces the fruit they are not below any bulge area that I would assume is where they graft them together. Matter of fact I can't see where they grafted it, maybe it is below the surface. I went ahead and cut them back a good bit, hopefully that is ok since we are in winter. Thanks for the advice!
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Laura4
Mobile, AL USA
19th January 2012 2:02am
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db says...
I would like to know which variety (may be dwarf) is best suited for pots, Brisbane weather and also has good flavour, anyone? I'm bit confused which variety to get after reading this thread so any suggestions appreciated.
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Db
Brisbane
13th February 2012 11:10am
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BJ says...
db, I'd go with the Freemont. They have been stocking dwarves in Bunnings recently from Birdwood.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
13th February 2012 11:51am
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db says...
Thanks BJ, Looks like Daleys also has Dwarf Freemont. One from Birdwood is any better from Daleys or anyone will do? Also, Freemont seems to have some seeds Is there any seedless variety that can also be considered? Have to tasted Freemont?
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Db
Brisbane
13th February 2012 11:59am
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Chris says...
Fremont is quite seedy and also on the small size, so it needs to be thinned heavily.
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Chris
Sydney
13th February 2012 1:04pm
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db says...
Thanks Chris, so which variety you will recommend then?
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Db
Brisbane
13th February 2012 1:10pm
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db says...
Japanese seedless varieties seems promising, is there any better choice?
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Db
Brisbane
14th February 2012 8:41am
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Original Post was last edited: 14th February 2012 8:48am
Jantina says...
db my climate is of course different to yours but we have a Japanese Seedless and it's very good.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
14th February 2012 10:06am
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Chris says...
db,
I have no experience with growing citrus in pots. For flavour consider Imperial, Daisy (Fremont x), Afourer or Honey Murcott. Imperial will probably have fewest seeds if other citrus are present.
The Japanese Satsumas tend to have a mild flavour, but are mostly seedless. I know dwarf imperial and dwarf Satsumas are available.
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Chris
Sydney
15th February 2012 7:45am
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Original Post was last edited: 15th February 2012 8:06am
Chris says...
I should add there are seedless strains of Daisy and Afourer in the USA, but they haven't made their way here yet. Honey Murcott can be v seedy if there are Valencias or lemons present.
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Chris
Sydney
15th February 2012 7:54am
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db says...
Thanks Chris.. Where can I buy dwarf imperial and dwarf Satsumas from? Daleys don't have it..
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Db
Brisbane
15th February 2012 9:14am
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BJ says...
Dwarf Imperials should be a Bunnings pick up. Never seen a satsuma around here, let alone dwarf.
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Theposterformerlyknownas
Brisbane
15th February 2012 9:34am
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db says...
I ended up buying Japanese seedless varieties..
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Db
Brisbane
18th February 2012 8:20pm
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Db says...
All of the Japanese seedless mandarin plants that I bought from Delays looks like they are cutting grown, even dwarf Okitsu wase is looks like cutting grown. I thought they all will be grafted. How are urs? Does is make any difference if it is cutting grown or grafted. Which is better?
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Db1
 
20th February 2012 8:10am
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db says...
Looks like they are T-budding, so looks like cutting grown, so no worries.. Anyway, still I wonder, which is better cutting grown or grafted plant? Like recently I bought Dwarf Mulberry which is cutting grown but Daleys also has few grafted plants in this Mulberry, which one turns out better?
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Db
Brisbane
20th February 2012 8:56am
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Original Post was last edited: 20th February 2012 8:58am
db says...
Can someone please tell me what should be the minimum distance between mandarin trees? I'm going to plant 3 varieties of Japanese seedless, one of them is dwarf.
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Db
Brisbane
22nd February 2012 11:26am
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Chris says...
db,
I would never buy a citrus sold from a cutting. Whilst they may be cheaper, they are inferior. Rootstocks enable trees to be grown in a range of climates and soils. They handle disease, drought, waterlogging, salinity and even nematodes better. More likely to fruit quicker as well.
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Chris
Sydney
22nd February 2012 12:14pm
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db says...
Chris, I checked mine again and as mentioned above mine are not from cuttings. All 3 are grafted (T-budding), initially I thought they are from cuttings but after carefully looking I noticed they are T-budding, not cutting grown.. So no worries..
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Db
Brisbane
22nd February 2012 12:28pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd February 2012 12:30pm
MaryT says...
I think they say 3 - 4 m apart db, for citrus?
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MaryT
Sydney
22nd February 2012 12:40pm
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Chris says...
Mandarins tend to be more upright and less spreading, so if you keep them lightly pruned you could perhaps get away with 3m.
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Chris
Sydney
22nd February 2012 1:22pm
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db says...
Thanks MaryT and Chris.. The spot which I was thinking is 4m garden bed, so I was thinking planting 3 mandarins there to form hedge.. There are no other plants on either side of this bed.. So I was thinking putting 2 on extreme end of this bed and dwarf variety in the centre, will that be too tight space for 3 plants? or better to extend that bed?

PS: Also, my dwarf variety is Okitsu wase, I'm not sure how tall this dwarf one will grow, any idea?
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Db
Brisbane
22nd February 2012 1:48pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd February 2012 1:51pm
MaryT says...
db that means you are planting them 2m apart max - you can do that but may need to prune them regularly to make them fit and you run the risk of having to take one out eventually anyway or their not being happy being crowded.
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MaryT
Sydney
22nd February 2012 2:11pm
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db says...
Can someone tell me how deep roots normally go of mandarin trees (grafted varieties), I know they are shallow but how deep they go? Soon I'm going to prepare soil in the garden bed I mentioned above. I'm thinking to dig up 1-1.5 feet down and mix lots of compost to improve my soil and then going to add some top up soil. Will that be sufficient considering mandarin roots are shallow?
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 9:15am
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MaryT says...
db you need to dig a hole twice the size of the roots of the tree as it is then back fill with your good soil, sit the tree on it so that the level of soil at the top of your pot plant is the same as that of the surrounding ground then fill the rest of the hole, firming down the soil well then water in. Don't worry about how far the tree roots will go eventually; they'll find their own way from then on.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 9:36am
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db says...
Thanks MaryT for the reply, I'm worried bcoz I have heavy clay soil and mandarin trees don't like clay, that why I wanted to know how deep roots go so that I can prepare soil accordingly. I already have couple of palm trees in this garden bed which I'm going to remove and then plant these mandarins. At the time of planting those palms, I had put lots of garden soil in the bed after removing clay so water is draining fine (even though surrounding soil is clay). I think I need to create small mound as well..
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 9:53am
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MaryT says...
I see, db. I have no experience with clay (I'm on sandstone) and my trees are in containers - BIG containers (wine barrels & 70 ltrs pots) so I guess if you think of the clay as a container I would dig a hole as big as that.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 10:08am
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db says...
MaryT, will tree grow same size or much smaller if grown in large pots like 110L+ instead of ground? I have 3 of these pots but I was still thinking to put plants in ground as that bed is perfect spot for them and I'll have to water them less frequently than compared to pots which dries out very quickly.
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 10:11am
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Original Post was last edited: 1st March 2012 10:15am
MaryT says...
They can get to a good size but never as big as one in the ground; no where near it. I only have a concrete car space so they're in containers. Container plants need a lot more care and I can only manage because my space is tiny.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 10:20am
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db says...
Thanks again MartT.. I think I'll put them in ground this time and save this pots for other big growing trees that I'm growing in smaller pots now.

Loved that picture, wow, so many trees in pots, I wonder how u manage to water them properly..
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 10:26am
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MaryT says...
I have them on drip but to water properly I drag a hose around and give each individual attention. Every so often I order in a ton of premium mix (at less than a quarter of the cost of buying in bags) and repot or top up the pots. Fortunately my neighbour's carspace is right next to mine and she does not have a car so the potting mix sits there until I'm done. It's a big project and not for the faint hearted.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 10:40am
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db says...
How much it cost u for premium mix? Few days back, I asked at 3-4 places here and good quality premium potting mix is priced from $160-$185 per cubic meter plus delivery charges and that is without any fertilizers in it.
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 10:51am
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Original Post was last edited: 1st March 2012 10:53am
MaryT says...
I used Australian Native Landscapes and they charge $143 per cubic meter of premium potting mix INCLUDING delivery (to LNS, Sydney) Tel. 131458 for quote to your area.
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 11:12am
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db says...
That's a good price, But I'm in Brisbane..
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 11:20am
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MaryT says...
db just google "potting mixes delivered to Brisbane" and you'll find someone near you. Usually they're landscape suppliers
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MaryT
Sydney
1st March 2012 11:27am
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db says...
Yep, that's where I already checked (landscapers) but they are bit pricy as said above. Anyway, I don't think I'll need potting mix in big quantity anytime soon until I re-pot them (may be early next year) or unless I decide to buy more fruit plants to grow in pots :)
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Db
Brisbane
1st March 2012 11:43am
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Marieyvonne says...
I have a mandarin tree that has many mandarins growing on it. The fruit started to grow in November and have still not ripened.
Any hints please !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Marieyvonne
 
13th March 2012 8:28pm
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Jason says...
That's a little bit hyper impatient! :D If you are in Melbourne they will flower in Spring and will be ripe the next Winter. Lucky you don't have an Avocado tree they take almost 2 years from flowering to ripe in Victoria
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Jason
Portland
13th March 2012 10:50pm
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MaryT says...
I've just picked my first ever mandarin off my tree. It was a Freemont. I've picked oranges, lemons, cumquats and limes but the experience of breaking into the mandarin was exquisite. I broke the tight skin with a knife and as I did I heard it CRACKLE! The peel came off and the segments parted easily. The taste? It was pleasant; not overly mandarin like, very juicy, slightly sweet with a sour note at the finish. Perhaps the flavour would have improved had I waited till it's fully coloured but I couldn't wait. I'm happy.

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MaryT
Sydney
15th May 2012 2:33pm
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Original Post was last edited: 15th May 2012 4:01pm
VF says...
Sounds lovely MaryT. Congrats.on your first Mandarin. I think we all enjoy that feeling of the first fruit on a newer tree, and it's always a bonus when it tastes GOOD!
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VF
Wongawallan
15th May 2012 4:58pm
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MaryT says...
Thanks, VF; I hope its flavour improves - I'll leave the rest on the tree until they're REALLY orange and see what happens. I imagine the skin will loosen as well?
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MaryT
Sydney
15th May 2012 5:10pm
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VF says...
Keep us posted - its good to hear about varieties I'm not familiar with.
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VF
Wongawallan
15th May 2012 5:23pm
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Chris says...
Fremont are not grown commercially for this very reason, because the skin is firmly attached making it difficult to peel and they tend to be very seedy.
But the flavour is rated highly, and I think they have very good flavour, but not as good as Afourer personally.
They tend to ripen here mid-June, MaryT.

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Chris
Sydney
15th May 2012 9:27pm
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Mike says...
Freemonts from California I think are sometimes in the supermarkets and along with afourer don't taste that good.Perhaps thy're getting on a bit by the time they get sold.Honey murcots and ellendale (really a tangor) are tight skinned ones that seem to be sold.
My emperors are outrageously loaded with sweet ripe fruit right now.I could bath in bath tubs of juice and I'm tanking up.Hicksons and murcots will take a bit longer.It is good to have fruit when the summer bounty has passed.
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Cairns
15th May 2012 9:54pm
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MaryT says...
I bought a bag of Imperials today and they're juicy and slightly sweet but the flavour is ordinary. My Freemont was not hard to peel, though not loose being still a bit green. One had two flat seeds and another had three or four seeds.
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MaryT
Sydney
15th May 2012 10:39pm
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Barb says...
Fruit Fly. I have several fruit trees in my yard and have had trouble with Fly as the neighbours fruit just falls off the tree and rots on the ground. Yes, we have asked him to clean it up but to no avail.

I have recently found that smearing vegemite onto porous pieces of wood and laying them under the tree has deterred them to the extent that so far we have only lost minimal amounts of Mandy. I read on the internet that the yeast in the vegemite attracts the fly and the high salst kills the fly. You only need to knock off the males as the females are harmless. Seems to be wroking OK so far. I too have tried everythign else but when you ahve a breeding ground next door it is pretty hard to control.
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Barb3
Geraldton
16th May 2012 4:27pm
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Mike says...
Emperors and honey murcott are amongst my daily pluck.The paw paw is a mongrel but still a hybrid orange with a gtreat taste.
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Cairns
16th May 2012 5:42pm
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Original Post was last edited: 16th May 2012 5:45pm
MaryT says...
Love that selection of your 'daily pluck' Mike - that should be in a thread of its own. I would love to know what people are eating from their garden every day. I can't help myself I ate another under ripe mandarin today. :)
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MaryT
Sydney
16th May 2012 5:56pm
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VF says...
Delicious selection Mike - you're the envy of us all further south.
Slow down MaryT - you'll have no ripe ones to eat (though they can't be too bad unripe if you're eating them all!)
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VF
Wongawallan
16th May 2012 6:10pm
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David says...
Hi Mary just saw the photo of your back yard ,that is amazing bet its a challenge for you to keep water up to them all ,well done im green with envy
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David
Brisbane
16th May 2012 7:21pm
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MaryT says...
Thanks David, I don't have a backyard - just that concrete patch which is my car space right outside my front door and a courtyard dominated by a giant jacaranda. Believe me watering is the least of my worries. Container gardening is not for the faint hearted. Most people ask if I'm running a nursery :)
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MaryT
Sydney
16th May 2012 7:37pm
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David says...
I can believe that Mary, looks soooo much better than some nurseries ive seen on my travels, your diversity is staggering
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David
Brisbane
16th May 2012 7:43pm
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Julie says...
Fruit from the supermarket never tastes as good as my own, even if they are the same variety. Maybe because I don't use any synthetic fertilisers?

Dunno, but it makes it hard to choose a new variety of fruit to grow if the only ones I can test are shop bought.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
16th May 2012 8:12pm
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Mike says...
Julie if you have helpers in the natural fertiliser department and us a little NPK as well as natural fertlisers it would be appreciated by the plants.
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Cairns
16th May 2012 8:25pm
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MaryT says...
I agree, Julie. There's a lot of luck in it - you hear others say a variety tastes good but they may have different conditions to what you can offer. Look at Mike's place - he even has organic lawn mowers that change grass to fertiliser!

David that's an old pic of my garden; I've had to give away a lot of trees because some became too big for the space (mulberries, a plum) and there were just too many trees. I'm still trying to achieve a balance of different types of vegetation.
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MaryT
Sydney
16th May 2012 9:23pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th May 2012 6:49am
Db says...
Around 3 months back, I put my 3 mandarin varieties in ground.. There is no new growth yet but I'm not worried abt it.. Recently some leaves on all 3 started to yellow and getting dropped, so I'm bit worried abt it.. Can it be due to lack of nitrogen or winter? Plants are heavily mulched with lucerne mulch and regularly gets Seasol for root development, gets water in every 4-5 day... Any suggestions?
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Db
Brisbane
4th June 2012 10:25am
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amanda says...
Citrus can get the winter "yellows" - but Brisbane would surely be too warm for that..? A brizzy person might know..?
They don't drop their leaves prematurely with the simple yellows either...do u think it's might be getting too much water Db..?

Have you checked the soil with a moisture meter maybe? Is it the oldest leaves dropping only..? (ie a natural winter attrition?) Is your soil clayey?

Sounds like u are taking good care of them - but maybe post a pic of some leaves would help here..?


As for fert's: I only give my citrus dynamic lifter (apart from manure now n then and mulch) - mine seem to thrive on this form of slow release fert's - and I give them little and often - rather that big twice-a-year feeds?

I honestly don't think they need as much feeding as the fertiliser companies would have us believe... ;-)
If u give them too much nitrogen the fruit with have a thick rind and will be of poorer quality.
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amanda19
Geraldton. 400km north of Perth.
4th June 2012 2:46pm
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Db says...
Thanks Amanda, over-watering could be issue here, as this spot does not get sun at all in winter (may be this could be also issue), so soil might be wet most of the time during watering.. My soil is heavy clay so I amended this spot before planting (in fact spot was already amended even before planting as I had palms before at this spot, I replaced old soil with new garden soil before planing mandarins).. Couple of feet down, there are gravels and drainage pipes underneath, so water should drain properly but surrounding soil is clay, so I'm not sure what exactly is issue.. Couple of weeks back, I feed them with liq powerfeed (I gave it bcoz I read citrus are heavy feeders and as leaves started to yellow I thought lack of nitrogen may be issue) so hoping to see some improvement if lack of nitrogen is really an issue.. Next time I'll feed with dynamic lifter but I'll need to remove mulch, put DL in soil and the put the mulch back which seems bit of hassle..
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Db
Brisbane
5th June 2012 8:37am
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Original Post was last edited: 5th June 2012 8:39am
Ellie says...
I have a imperial mandarin tree in my back yard it's about 3 year old now and going good!! I'm pretty sure the whole was 25cm wide and 35cm deep, they are supper yummy and get about 6 mandarines in one lot! Having a mandarine tree is a defiantly to do!!
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Ellie
Wollongong
1st July 2015 9:55pm
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Original Post was last edited: 1st July 2015 9:51pm

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