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Pinkabelle Apple Tree

    378 responses

Robert starts with ...
Has anyone had much to do with the Pinkabelle apple tree? i have become very interested in them since seeing them on better homes and gardens and in several magazines.

Are they low chill? Has anyone tasted one? if you have, how do they compare to your regular pinklady apple?

Thanks.

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Robert2
Gympie
21st June 2007 8:21pm
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Anonymous says...
On the gardening show they said it is the pink lady apple...on a dwarf stock
...I grow the normal pink lady...my favourite apple and it had it's first fruit after 5 years last year...it is a strong hardy tree.The gardeners on the radio were full of praise for the Pinkabelle and they require the same conditions as the normal pink lady...I hope that helps
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Melissa2
Luddenham.com
30th June 2007 8:12am
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Peter Allen says...
web searchs say this is pink lady on a dwarf roostock other say it s a pink lady type dwarf apple growing 2m h x 1m wide.
you can graft normal Pinklady or any other apple on dwarf rootstock say M9 and it will stay small , even varieties with T3 vigour should stay under 2.4mtr.
even smaller if you can get hold of some M27.
These will all grow in a pot or will need a stake in very windy exposed sites.
My Blenheim Orange on M9 has not been watered since the day after i planted it and produces 55kg of large apples each year, after 10 years it is still only 2mtr high.
you can learn to graft and get dwarf trees at free grafting workshops in Vic see www.heritagefruits.org for locations
cheers "Peter the Permie"
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Peter the permie
Monbulk
30th June 2007 9:15am
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Correy says...
The pinkabelle for best results requires you to grow a granny smith as well. It is for temperate climates so you may be right in gympie.

If you check out Daleys Apple Tree Page. you will find information on the Pinkabelle and also there is a Dwarf Pink Lady. I would say that they are very similar except the Pinkabelle has been trademarked hence it costs $34 instead of just $22.75 for the normal dwarf pink lady.
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Correy
Correy
30th June 2007 10:13am
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melissa says...
Yes I have heard the same thing about Lotsa Lemons too.I grow the pink lady and have no Granny Smith but it must have crossed with the crabapple ...because it did fruit which was a surprise as I was off to buy a Granny Smith....and found it was ok without it.
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melissa3
Luddenham
30th June 2007 11:58am
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Peter Allen says...
dont go and buy a granny smith just for pollination there are hundreds of apples that will pollinate a Pink lady, one othe way is to graft one small branch of granny to the pink lady tree. you only need a small peice of scion wood, a knife and tape. do it between now and end of Aug while its dormant.
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Peter the permie
Monbuk .Vic
30th June 2007 6:42pm
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melissa says...
Thanks Peter great idea! :^)
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Melissa2
Luddenham
1st July 2007 11:07am
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caitlin says...
will my pinkabelle fruit without another apple tree in the yard?
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caitlin
 
2nd July 2007 1:53pm
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Kath says...
I spoke to our supplier of the Pinkabelle apples today and they tell me it will set on its own although they will produce more fruit if they are cross pollinated with either another Pinkabelle or a suitable pollinator, which is any apple that will pollinate a pink lady. I am waiting to hear back on the chill requirements for the Pinkabelle.
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Kath
Cawongla
5th July 2007 3:34pm
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Melissa says...
The gardening program said that Pinkabelle is "pink lady" grafted onto dwarfing rootstock...so would'nt that mean whatever pink lady needs for chill would be the same....my pink lady set fruit in quite a warm situation.Hope that helps :)
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Melissa2
Luddenham
5th July 2007 6:44pm
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Trevor says...
I've got a dwarf Jonathon and Granny Smith, and would love to graft some Pink Lady onto the Jonathon. Where can I buy some cuttings, pls?
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Trevor1
Melbourne
22nd July 2007 9:45pm
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Anonymous says...
Trevor you could come to a Heritage Fruits Group grafting day, a peice of scion will cost $1 with about 86 vars including Pink lady to get there.
see www.petethepermie.com for locations throughout melb from this sunday and all aug all 1-4pm
cheers peter
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Peter the permie
Olinda
23rd July 2007 7:29pm
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Craig Perring says...
Hi all,

My name is Craig Perring and i work for PlantNet, the company that is selling the Pinkabelle apple.
I am sorry that i did not see this post earlier as i could have helped a few people by the sounds of it.
The first point i would like to make is that is a dwarfing tree NOT on a dwarfing rootstock as per other "dwarf varieties". It is fact on 106 rootstock which is considered to be vigourous (some are on Nothern Spie rootstock too).
The apples are full size and are, and taste wise are the same as Pink lady apples. The only difference that we have found is that they crop approximately 2 weeks before a normal Pink Lady. The taste is beautiful (admittedly i am a bit bias as Pink Ladies are my favourite apple). I think the apples are tiny bit bigger too (may need glasses?), although that comes down to my own judgement.
Pinkabelle is partially self fertile, but benefits from cross pollination - i.e. it will set fruit if have one tree, it will set more fruit if you have two and will set an abundance of fruit if you have a cross pollinator. There are many pollinators - most of which come in a dwarf form (i.e grafted on a dwarf stock) such as granny smith, gala varieties, red delicious, crab apple and others - as long as it is flowering at the same time as Pinkabelle. Grannies are being recommended as a good cross simply as they are a longer flowering apple than most and cover early and mid season apples (and even some later fruiting varieties).
Pinkabelle is a temperate apple which equates to chilling hours as about medium chill.
Pinkabelle is different to normal dwarf Pink Lady apples due to its form - as mentioned it is a dwarfing tree not on dwarfing rootstock. It is a spur bearing apple, partially self fertile, fruits approximately 2-3 weeks earlier, been proven in a pot, heavy cropper (once mature and it is being cross pollinated you can expect up to approximately 35-40kg of fruit) - the price tag being heavier does not come down being trademarked. Pinkabelle is PBRed and therefore royalties to the owners of Pinkabelle have to be paid which drives the price up.
I hope this helps with some of your questions and i am happy to answer more if anyone would like more information.
cheers,
Craig Perring
w: (02) 9838 1909
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Craig from PlantNet
Riverstone, NSW
30th July 2007 5:38pm
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Anonymous says...
Thanks Craig for that info it does help to get the true information, being a PVR tree we wont do them at our heritage grafting days but I would like to know the Pollination number Ie. F15 as per the " book of apples" so we can help people with Pollinators when they ask, also is it a Diploid.
How tall do you think it will get on MM106.
cheers Pete the permie
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Peter the permie
Olinda
30th July 2007 7:30pm
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Craig Perring says...
Hi again,

In response to Pete the Permie's comments, please see below:

Pinkabelle is a diploid and any pollinator suitable for Pink Lady will work for Pinkabelle. I do not have access to the "Book of Apples", so i can not comment on the Pollination Number. (see PDF chart attached)

On a MM 106 or Northern Spy rootstock Pinkabelle will get to approximately 2 metres tall. (see attached image of owner/breeders with a 7 year old field grown tree - the tree is planted on a mound, but it bascially stands at 2 mts)

A few extra comments on the difference between Pinkabelle (being a naturally occuring dwarf tree) and other apple varieties grown on dwarfing rootstocks:

Pinkabelle is propagated on strong rootstocks which means it will have have far less problems with pests and disease. The MM series, including Northern Spy are resistant to attacks from woolly aphids and soil pathogens and will tolerate a wider range of soil types than standard trees on dwarf stocks.

Strong stocks have better drought tolerance and require less water and have no need for support.

The spur growth habit of Pinkabelle on a strong rootstock means a robust compact fruitful tree that needs minimal to no pruning - unless you are trying to achieve a specific shape!

As Pete has correctly pointed out - being a PBR protected variety means you can not propagate this variety under PBR laws. For more info on PBR laws you can visit this site:
http://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/pbr/index.shtml

I hope this helps with some more of the enquiries in this forum. I would be happy to answer any further queries about Pinkabelle, so please do not hesitate to contact me on (02) 9838 1909.

regards,
Craig Perring
PlantNet

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Craig from PlantNet
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1st August 2007 11:12am
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Trevor says...
Thanks, I sourced some Pink Lady cuttings, and will be grafting this weekend. I've got grafting tape, do I need to use grafting wax also, or is a mud mix like on Vasili's garden ok, pls?
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Trevor2
Mitcham
1st August 2007 10:49pm
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ben silver says...
Apples are so forgiving that you can use either or none but more demanding fruit eg persimmons ,I would use wax . There is talk that you can introduce infection to the wound but that may be just talk
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Bsilver
sydney
2nd August 2007 9:21am
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Melissa says...
Someone told me that you can grow persimmons from cuttings ...but that can't be right surely....anyone heard of that?
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Melissa2
Luddenham
7th August 2007 1:01pm
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Trevor says...
Thanks, Ben. I just used a cleft graft, a sharp knife, and grafting tape in the end - looks ok. Also got keen and grafted some Tahitian lime cuttings onto a Eureka lemon - it will be interestin to see how this goes too.
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Trevor1
Mitcham
7th August 2007 8:51pm
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bodile says...
Hello, I am interested in your variety show(varieties) of apples! In France, we have no pink lady on sale for paticulier. Nor Caméo. can you help me to find at you a salesman of tree and to give me the expenses of purchase of the tree and the expenses of sendings? Maybe that I can help you to find things which I possess in France and which you do not have? I am very satisfied to have read your forum!
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27th October 2007 4:47pm
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Jenny says...
Hi, I Bought male and female pinkabelle plants last winter which have flowered and borne what I think are baby pinkabelles. The fruit does not seem to be developing well and is now falling off. I water everyday. Does anyone know why this is happening? Thanks
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Jenny2
Sydney, NSW
31st October 2007 10:49am
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Kath says...
This is common with young trees as they are not large enough to hold the fruit, they abort the fruit so they can put their energy into growing.
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Kath
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1st November 2007 5:11am
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Samantha says...
Hi, I'm so glad to have found this thread, and thanks to all for the great info. I bought my pinkabelle last week and it's flowering beautifully. I'm just wondering how long between flower and fruit appearing. Some of the flowers are starting to die off and I'm wondering how long before fruit will appear.
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Samantha1
Sydney
3rd November 2007 7:42pm
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Bob says...
When is plants plus releasing new trees?

The pinkabelle rocks and we want more !

Bob
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bob1
Perth
8th January 2008 4:13pm
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Craig Perring says...
HI Bob,

Glad you like the Pinkabelle. The company that released it is PlantNet - the reason i know is because i work for PlantNet!!

We are releasing a new "donut peach" this winter so keep you eyes peeled. I am hoping Plants Plus will stock them as they did with our Pinkabelle.

Take this as a scoop regarding the Donut Peach as we have not made any announcements as yet and will more than likely launch the donut peach in April, as we did with the Pinkabelle last year.

It is a sweet white fleshed donut shaped peach. Very sweet. Only grows to 3m and if you really wanted to you could put it in a pot (would have to be a large pot), although we recommend it goes in the ground, however i am going to put one in large pot myself to see how it goes. It is 100% self pollinating and like Pinkabelle will only be released in limited numbers for the first year. More info to come.....

I have attached the label, and as i say, take this as a first as no-one has seen this label except us and the printers!

We will be updating our website soon with more information, images and of course stockists.

Little note for Samantha regarding flowering - Fruit should already be visible. Fruit matures around April (ANZAC dayish). If there is no fruit do not stress as all fruit trees when young can take a season or two to fruit. Although partially self fertile Pinkabelle will do better with a cross pollinator (see Daley's website!) and increase the chance of more fruit. We can certainly help Daley's obtain (in Winter) some of the dwarf cross pollinators such as dwarf granny smiths and dwarf crab apples if they are low on stock.

Hope this helps. feel free to contact me if you have any more questions.

Cheers,
Craig Perring
PlantNet
(02) 9838 1909
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Craig from PlantNet
Riverstone, Sydeny
8th January 2008 7:31pm
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Bob says...
Can you line up some dwarf polinators for WA?

We can't import apple trees.

Bob
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bob1
Perth
10th January 2008 12:03pm
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Leona says...
I have a Pinkabelle, with flowers...I am hoping my Ballerinas will pollinate it. I have Anna and Dorsett but they are not suitable pollinators apparently.
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Bob says...
Anna and Dorset being low chill early
flowerers, flower too early but otherwise are compatible with pinkabelle.

Mine had fruit in the nursery when I bought it, so have to wait til next year to see if it will fruit.
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bob1
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5th February 2008 11:55am
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Correy says...
Hi Bob:
1. Regarding "full size tree to pollinate"

There are many dwarf apple trees that will happily pollinate the Pinkabelle. For example Daleys recommends on the pinkabelle web-page the dwarf granny smith because it is known to flower for a long time.

Also up the top of this forum page you are reading there is a pdf attachment from one of Craig's comments dated 1st August 2007 which includes an exhaustive list of pollinators.

2. Regarding being: completely non self fertile

I believe that the marketing is clear that it is partially self fertile. I think it is great that although you won't get as big a crop you can still get some apples perhaps when it is older even without another apple tree in site. I think it is great to inform customers like they have: "Pinkabelle® is partially self fertile, but will benefit from cross pollination.". This is how Daleys have advertised many of our other fruit trees that are partially self pollinating as well. Most people understand what this means as I am sure you do Bob.

In my opinion the pinkabelle is a very exciting new apple tree and the pictures of the huge crops on such small trees coming in is magnificent and very encouraging to see.

I am so glad that the dwarf varieties are again becoming more popular so that those of us with limited space can include fruit trees in our backyard.
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5th February 2008 12:29pm
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Bob says...
Yes, but us poor buggers in WA can't
get the dwarf apples.
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bob1
Perth
5th February 2008 4:16pm
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Elizabeth says...
Bob, can you get Flemings plants anywhere in Perth? Flemings has a dwarf Gala tree (which I bought a few months ago to go with my Pinkabelle).
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Leona says...
I know what you mean Bob, apart from the Pinkabelle, all I have managed to get hold of, in the way of dwarf apple trees, are the Anna and Dorsett...and they were from Wondawest, which is now closed. I suspect it would cost a fortune to get only one or two trees sent over now because of the spraying etc.
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Bob says...
Apple trees have to spend 2 years in a quarantine glasshouse. Costs about 200
bucks per tree.

I have asked every nursrey in Perth for dwarf trees, Olea in Manjimup, might be doing some next season then it's 2 years
til they are ready to sell ( 1 year for the rootstock and 1 year for the graft to grow). Ohh, yeah you have to buy 25 trees per order miniumum, as they are wholesale only.
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6th February 2008 10:03am
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Bob says...
Flemings won;t sell the apples as they are not allowed in. They license the ballerinas to Olea Nsy for growing but they are not very nice to eat I'm told and need lotsa chill.

Bob
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Perth
6th February 2008 10:04am
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Leona says...
Far out Bob, you sure have done your homework LOL. As far as Ballerinas go, I have three (well, now two actually). My Bolero died in this recent hot weather unfortunately but my two Maypoles are doing very well and are currently fruiting...although you are correct, they are not very nice to eat, being crab apples. The Bolero did taste quite nice though. I was worried that I would not get enough chill hours (I live near the coast) but I havent had a problem with them flowering and fruiting.
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6th February 2008 10:55am
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Anonymous says...
Bob & Leona,
Wow, Pinkabelle must have gone to a lot of trouble to be available for sale in WA considering most other apples aren't.

WA quarantine officials use this reasoning why they have strict conditions regarding apple tree quarantine:

"... Western Australia is the only region free of both apple scab and codling moth.... One of our inspectors will never forget an orchard owner crying on his shoulder as they watched the orchard go up in flames."
http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/content/pw/q/QFruit_DLsheet.pdf

If you are passionate about this it might be best to contact W.A Quarantine with your concerns or even your local member of parliment to get the laws relaxed for backyard orchardists like yourself.
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Bob says...
They had no probs, as Pinkabelle was invented in WA down Manji way.

It was a sport found in a large pink
lady orchard.

Thus, we actually sent you eastern types the plants.
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bob1
Perth
6th February 2008 2:27pm
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Correy says...
I would be interested to know the finer details of how the pinkabelle apple tree was developed if you knew?
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Correy
Woolloongabba, QLD
6th February 2008 5:39pm
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Bob says...
As far as I know it was not developed but found in an orchard by a smart orchardist who noticed the stunted growth of one particular plant.

Nearly 100 percent of trees are on MM106 so the difference would have been noticeable.

I think the smart bit was recognising it as a bud sport and not a sick tree needing pulling out.

Bob

PS I helped Cripps breed the original pink lady and Sundowner at Stoneville RS.
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Perth
8th February 2008 9:07am
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Liz says...
We bought 2 pinkabelle apple trees Last year after reading an article in the paper. Cost $40ea. They were just a stick and through summer have flourished. There are 2 apples on 1 tree. Jenny of Sydney 31st October said she bought a male and female. How do you tell that especially when they are a stick and is it imperative that they be male and female when you only have 2 pinkabelles because from what I've read on here, living in Perth I'm going to have buckleys of getting a good pollinator.
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Liz4
PERTH
19th February 2008 1:06am
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Bob says...
There is no such thing as male and female. Check out woodbridge fruit trees website for a good article on pollination.

I paid $50 each from Waldecks.

Cincture the trunk above the buds to make it into a fluffy stick with more fruiting.
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bob1
Perth
19th February 2008 12:14pm
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Liz says...
Thanks for that info Bob. Haven't had any luck seeing the pollination article at Woodbridge Fruit Trees website. Is it possible to talk to you by phone since we both live in Perth. If so I'm happy to put my mobile number on here and if you were willing to give me your mobile or private number, you could call me to give me your number and I would call you straight back.
Thanks,

Regards Liz
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Liz4
Perth
27th February 2008 5:28pm
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aNON says...
http://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/resources/Articles/Cross%20Pollination.pdf
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aNON
 
28th February 2008 11:00am
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aNON says...
www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/pomes/apples/crabapple-pollinators
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aNON
 
28th February 2008 11:18am
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aNON says...
Hows that LZ?

Bob
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aNON
 
28th February 2008 11:18am
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Valerie Son says...
I am so excited about this new tree and would appreciate so much some advice.

I grew up in Northern California where I could literally walk out into my backyard and pick any variety of fruit. Maybe its my version of a mid-life, but I am wanting very much to go back to that lifestyle. We are looking at a piece of property where we can grow many trees (zone 7/8-north of Dallas). It has a gradual slope down one side (with a large pond). It also has a very large flatter area on top.

Because pinkabelle's grow so well in this zone, I was wondering if you had any advice on where to plant a small orchard (on slope?). Where to get the best (strongest-most resistant) trees and should I have any concerns planting them alongside (or below) a peach orchard?

Thank you and I am so excited to hear back!!
Val
val@son.org
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Valerie Son
McKinney Texas
29th February 2008 5:45am
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aNON says...
This is an aussie site, you would ahve to ask a lot of those questions in the USA.
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29th February 2008 11:51am
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aNON says...
www.davewilson.com is the best site in USA for your needs.
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Stuart says...
Hi,
I've seen that Granny Smith and Crab Apple are suitable pollinators for the Pinkabelle. When and how long does the Crab Apple flower for compared to the Granny Smith? We don't have a lot of room in our garden. I'd like to go with the Crab Apple just for variety but if it's flowering time is a lot less than the Granny Smith I'll probably go with the Granny Smith to maximise fruiting on the Pinkabelle.

Some more questions.
How long would a Pinkabelle usually take to bear fruit?

What's the best climate and planting position for the Pinkabelle? I live in Brisbane.
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Brisbane
11th March 2008 7:47pm
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aNON says...
Pinkabelle can fruit on 1 year tissue but more likely on spurs 2 years or older.

I think Brissy would be too warm but the sellers reckon its a goer there.
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Sophie says...
Hi there, I have just bought a pinkabelle apple tree and I am after tips on actually planting the tree. ie, should I put some sort of fertilser in when I plant it and if so what sort etc.
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17th March 2008 2:24pm
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Anonymous says...
hello sophie. first the whole needs to be about a meter square dug to about 2 inches above the root line. the loosen all that area up. deep water it let it soak place the tree in the middle and file in. Resoak the whole and do this every 3 days for 2 weeks. you can put some seasol at the begining. after 2 weeks use a fruit fertizer. never use fertilizer with a fresh planted tree.
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aNON says...
I agree, anybody that recomends fert in the hole is nuts, it may work for some but most just burn the fresh roots you were supposed to be helping.
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17th March 2008 3:19pm
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Sophie says...
Thankyou very much, much appreciated it doesnt have any special instructions on the plants tag about planting.
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Sophie says...
Also it has been extremly hot here in SA will it be okay if I plant it out in the garden now? We finally have a cool change about to come through now!!!
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SA
17th March 2008 8:45pm
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aNON says...
Get it in ASAP, roots grow better in ground than pot, that way it's settled before winter.

Extra water if hot in a trough around plant.
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Sophie says...
Thanks aNON, yeh thats what I figured I planted it out today with your planting instructions. Lets hope we get some apples in the near future!!!
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aNON says...
Dudes, great news. Ladybug garden centre has heaps of pinkabelles left in stock, they did not have the flashy promotional signs like Waldecks, so looks like the public was not aware how good they are.

They are on Albany Hwy, Maddington, WA.

They are also $10 cheaper than anybody else!
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Libby says...
I just bought 2 apple trees from Bunnings Auburn in Sydney. They are pink lady n golden delicous n they came from flemings nursery. Unfortunately, when I contacted Flemings, I was told that I need a granny smith or a red fuji for cross pollination. So does anyone know how I can get cuttings to graft them in?
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Sydney
13th April 2008 4:38pm
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Liz says...
Libby, As far as I know you just need to get a Granny Smith tree and plant it. I wouldn't think you need to graft. I am no expert, just learnt things on here. Bob is the expert. He'll probably tell you. He is very helpful. I also have a query for anyone who may know. Our 2 pinkabelles are in pots, one is in a bigger pot than the other and consequently is a bit bigger than the other tree but the smaller one has 2 apples on it. We are going to get some half beer barrels to plant them in. Would that be the best and can someone tell me when to transfer them. Do we need to wait till all the leaves are off? We live in Perth. Thankyou to all the people who help out people like me who don't know much about growing fruit trees.
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Perth
14th April 2008 4:49pm
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aNON says...
LZ

Transfer in winter like you would
plant
a bare root tree.

Bash off lots of dirt and replace with new soil. ie almost bare root it again.

Potting mix goes stale after a while, sounds drastic but is the good info.
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16th April 2008 11:42am
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Joe says...
I have just purchased a pinkabelle apple tree, I was wanting to know how long it takes before it starts to set fruit as my 3 year old daughter keeps asking me??? I have planted it directly into the ground and I live in melbourne. Please help me!!!!
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16th April 2008 4:37pm
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aNON says...
It will flower in spring and fruit in April (late) or May (early).

Hopefully you have a pollinator nearby.
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Joe says...
Hello. I was just wandering if there was any difference between the apple "Delicious" and "Red Delicious" as I have found a "Delicious" tree at my local market. I want to use it as the pollinator to my pinkabelle, will this work??????
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Melbourne
21st April 2008 9:57am
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Joe says...
Also, is it recommended to graft a cutting from a granny smith or a red delicious onto the pinkabelle???? Can anyone suggest any good sites on learning how to graft??? Thanks
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Melbourne
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Craig Perring, PlantNet says...
Hi all,

My name is Craig Perring and i am from PlantNet, the company that brings you Pinkabelle.

Sorry about the lack of correspondence of late. I have not been blogging since January, but have not been too concerned as Bob seems to be steering the Pinkabelle ship in the right direction with regard to queries. There is a few questions that I want to answer and few comments to clarify. I have covered most topics listed here, but If i have not addressed your issue it means Bob has already correctly answered it!!

* Wandilla Nursery (4th Feb post by Bob) have got it wrong regarding pollination. Pinkabelle IS partially self fertile, but will benefit from cross pollination. This means if you have one Pinkabelle you get small amounts of fruit i.e. a couple - if you have a cross pollinator (granny smith, crab apple etc) you will get an abundance of fruit compared to if you don't have a cross pollinator. Im not sure what Wandilla are basing their assumptions on. Wandilla should also be telling their clients that most fruit trees will take a few years to set their first crop so not to panic if there is no fruit in the first year. I know many people who have bought Pinkabelle's last year (would have bought a 2 year old tree) and got fruit. On trials conducted, we have averaged 9-10kg of fruit on a three year old trees - this is in an orchard where the NEAREST pollinator (a fuji in this case) is 100 metres away. In other words it is in a low pollination area. Fruit amounts will increase each year as the plant matures. The lady at Wandilla should also note to her customers that being in WA is different to other states as there is a lack of dwarf varieties - only in WA - and at no stage has our marketing even suggested that "Customers have to purchase a full size tree to pollinate Pinkabelle". All we are saying and all our marketing says is that it benefits from cross pollination. What size trees people buy is up to them! I would not call it silly marketing, i would call it unfortunate that WA does not have access to the range if trees we have in the eastern states. Apart from all else i have not had any contact from Wandilla to clarify any questions they may have had regarding Pinkabelle which is disappointing as they are mis-informing their customers.

* With reagrd to pollination check out my post from 1st August 2007. There is a pollination chart there which will show you which apples are available to cross pollinate Pinkabelle's. Pinkabelle is a mid season flowering apple so there is plenty of varieties (many which do come in dwarf form)to choose from - except of course in WA, where there are limited varieties for the home gardener. Always ask your local nursery to order particular plants in for you if they are not on the shelf or you can not source them anywhere else. Many nurseries put their deciduous plant orders in now (and through the earlier months of the year) so if you want a dwarf granny, dwarf crab apple or similar now is the time to mention it to your nursery so they can get one in for you. Winter may be too late as many dwarf forms sell out from the wholesaler early in the peace. I have just checked with one of our nurseries (wholesaler) that he has 7 dwarf apple varieties (Golden delicious, Red Delicious, Red Fuji, Pink Lady all of which have sold out and Jonathon (60 left), Gala (40 left) and Granny Smith (45 left)). So to avoid disappointment get in now and reserve whatever dwarf plants you may want as these plants are becoming more popular and move through the retial nurseries fairly fast. Another good tip is if you are unsure of which pollinator to buy for your area make sure you pop into a nursery at the same time your Pinkabelle is flowering and pick a variety that is flowering at the same time!

* To answer Bob's question YES - we can line up some dwarf pollinators in WA and are in the process of doing so. As you know plants do take time to propagate and grow so it is still some time away but it will happen!! Like all things in the garden, patience is a virtue! As we are able to discuss this more we will certainly post some information about it. One thing for certain for WA gardeners is you will not have to buy 25 trees from Olea Wholesale Nursery as these trees will be made available to the public and should be available in most nurseries - if not all - where Pinkabelle is sold.

* For those interested in how Pinkabelle was dicsovered, Bob was right in saying it was discovered as a sport. For those of you who think i am talking about a game of some sort i will explain what a sport is, with the help of the Royal Horticulural Society www.rhs.org.uk ): "A sport is a spontaneous mutation from the plant that bears it, differing in one or more characteristics. It might have a different flower colour, double instead of single blooms, variegated instead of all-green leaves or a dwarf habit, ...."
If you look at my post at the top of the blog (August 1 2007) you will see a picture of the clever apple orchardists who discovered Pinkabelle (in 1999) as a sport in their orchard. They are based in Donnybrook. The tree they are standing next to is 6 years old in this photo and averages about 20kg of fruit each year.
You may be wondering why it has taken 9 years to get to your garden centre? It is because we have to trial and test the trees to see what characteristics have mutated, such as pollination issues(which i touched on above), size of trees, fruit maturity etcetc. We have to do this so we know what we are talking about when we sell and market our products to retail nurseries, their customers and people on blogs!

* To Stuart in Brissy. We have stated that Pinkabelle will only grow in temperate regions. good examples of this are toowoomba, stanthorpe parts of western Brisbane. Depending where you are located in brissy will depend on the succcess of your Pinkabelle. I would be interested to find out more and to see how it goes. All retail nurseries we have sold Pinkabelle trees to, in what we would consider non temperate regions, we have made sure that they understand that there is a risk that the tree may not fruit for some of their customers depending on where they lived....having said all that. Many people i have spoken too in Brisbane are keen to take the risk and give it a go anyway "to see how it goes"!! With regard to your other questions - you should get fruit any time from the 2nd year. Granny Smiths are good pollinators as their flowering period is longer than most other apples, however it comes down to personal choice as to what you like. In terms of helping Pinkabelle fruit there is probably no difference. Both are very suitable for Pinkabelle pollinators.

* Valerie in the US - Pinkabelle has been sent to the USA and i am 99% certain it has just been release from quarantine over there. The best person to speak to is Lynnell Brandt. He will be able to tell you about the development status at the moment. Contact him through this website: http://www.ewbrandt.com/contact-us.htm
With reagrd to your other questions. Planting on a slope if fine. Planting next to a peach orchard will have no detrimental effect on your apple orchards. Many apple orchardists in Australia grow some sort of stone fruit too. You will limited where you will be able to get your trees from as we have restricted who is allowed to grow Pinkabelle outside of Australia. Lynnell will be able to supply you the best and "strongest-most resistant" trees in the USA, but i dare say that is a few years away as yet as budwood numbers would be very limited at the present time.

I hope this answers all questions. Sorry it is such a long winded post - it wil teach me to not leave it so long next time. Any other questions please feel free to contact me direct on (02) 9838 1909 or continue to run them through this Daley's forum so everybody can learn. Our website www.plantnet.com.au ) is currently being updated with some new information - with pollination being included in that - as it seems an area of confusion for some people who are new to fruit growing. Website should be finalised by mid May with an updated list of stockists.

Cheers,
Craig Perring
PlantNet
(02) 9838 1909
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PlantNet Office, Riverstone
21st April 2008 1:56pm
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aNON says...
That Craig's a helpful guy.

Bring on the dwarf granny smith pollinator, and I will be absolutley set.

My Pinkabelle trees are absolute ball tearers, they are big thick and bushy.

I am not sure of the rootstock but they
are very vigourous (read helathy) for a
dawrf plant if that makes sense.
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aNON says...
Craig

Here is what gardeners want

Dwarf cherry on gisela 5 or zee stem interstock

Low chill cherry eg Royal Lee % Minnie Royal.

Dwarf Apricot eg genetic dwarf or Pumiselect or pixy rootstock.

Dwarf peaches/nectarines that fruit earlier or later than pixzee/nectazee we want a mini orchard that fruits over an extended period. eg www.davewilson.com vaieties.

I realise a lot aof the above are pateneted to others but ANFIC or bradfords copy whatever Zaiger release within a year or two, so you should be able to do the same or get the wholsale nursery to grow them and you sell them eg Flemings ahave a 50 tree min order.

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Peter the permie says...
Hi this list seems to be going in a circle,if you go back to the start of the thread you will see that any apple can be dwafted by using the right rootstock, most apple in nurseries are on "Granny smith seedling" and have the potential to grow to 6m high x 6 m wide. by putting any variety on say M9 you can keep it to 1.8m and plant them 1 m apart ( a stake or wire is best as it has a small root system) this one is idea for pots, M26 will make it about 2- 2.4 m high and does not need a stake, then MM102 or MM106 give more height and vigour say for espaliers plus are better for multiple grafts on the same tree. the size of fruit is not affected but with smaller trees there is less pruning, easy to net and more variety can be grown in the same space. our Heritage fruits group has 419 apple vars with 620 still avail in Vic. have a go and put a polinator on you Pinkabelle yourself go back to the PDF supplied earlier by Craig out of "all about apples" book and try something different. a piece of scion still only costs $1 at our grafting days in Vic this winter you can find them on www.heritagefruits.org you can also contact Harry from SA rare fruits society they also run grafting days in SA, we will have similar groups in NSW & WA this year and we are about to launch the Heritage Fruits society in Vic late in May check our website for details www.petethepermie.com

I would suggest we probably have 100+ vars to pollinate your Pinkabelle tree.
cheers peter
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monbulk vic
5th May 2008 8:31pm
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aNON says...
Pete

Totall irrelvant comment.
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Andrew Britton says...
Hi Craig,

I live on the south coast of NSW and I am currently searching for a dwarf pink lady tree for my small back yard. Can i get one of the pinkabella apples trees as well and will this be a good cross pollinator to the dwarf pink lady. I know very little about this topic but keen to learn. Can you email me directly please.

Cheers
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Andrew Britton
Nowra, Sth Coast NSW
11th May 2008 7:14pm
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Elizabeth says...
Andrew,

I've done a fair amount of research lately on this issue so I think I can help.

I'm in Sydney so (too few) chill hours are a factor. However, in Nowra I presume you get colder winters and some frosts?

Pinkabelle I think is a sport (a naturally occuring variation) of a normal Pink Lady tree. It may be a cross-pollinator, but I'm not sure if it would be too close. Pink Lady/Pinkabelle have a variety of appropriate cross pollinators, many of which are available as dwarfs. These include Granny Smith, Gala, Crabapples, Fuji and Lady Williams.

Daleys has dwarf Granny Smith and Pink Lady. You could also try nurseries stocking Flemmings trees - they make dwarf Pink Lady and Gala trees. You can also order many of these dwarf apple trees from Woodbridge Fruit Trees in Tasmania. Flemings and Woodbridge both have website which you can find easily through Google.
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11th May 2008 8:00pm
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Anonymous says...
Thanks Elizabeth,

I will Google it up and have a look.

Cheers

Andrew
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PlantNet says...
Hi Andrew,

Elizabeth seems to have covered you queries.

All winter stock will be out in the nurseries in the next few weeks and there is planty of places on the South coast where you can get them.

Go to our website - www.plantnet.com.au to find your list of stockists on the south coast.

we have just updated our website to a HTML format as well as flash player as some people were finding it difficult to access it through the flash player...all info is the same but the flash site is much nicer!!!

There are many nurseries who produce and sell dwarf fruit trees, fleming's just seem to grow the most!! JFT Nurseries and GJ Goodman's (Olea Nurseries in WA) are all excellent nurseries who sell through the retailers.

Andrew (or anyone)if you ave any more queries please call me on (02) 9838 1909 as i could not find your email address to respond too.

Cheers,
Craig
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aNON says...
I ate my pinkabelle yesterday.

Superb !
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Leona says...
I hope you only ate the fruit, not the tree aNON lol (just kidding) ;) So, did it taste the same as Pink Lady apples from the shops?
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aNON says...
It was sweeter than the shops given that it was still a bit green.Shop ones
that green are quite tart.

I pulled it off before the caterpillars were sprayed with pyrethrum. They were only 3mm long but a really skeletonised the leaves.
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Brian &amp; Carole says...
We have two pinkabelles in pots. They are about 1350 cms in height, when purchased last year they were just sticks(from Lena Nuseries Wanneroo)one had has produced two apples, one the size of a medium sized Pink Lady the other is still small but growing. The larger apple tasted better than a Pink Lady, crisp and sweet with just the slightest hint of tartness. Two items we would like help with, how close together should the trees be to maximise pollination ? Cincturing the tree to encourage bushiness how and what do you use ?
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aNON says...
I cincture with the blade of a secuteur.

Just push it in until the hard bit is reached, put it about 12mm above the bud
you want to grow.

If your really keen you can do it twice and remove the width of a matchstick of bark.
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aNON says...
Ohh, yeah only go halfway around the trunk or you will ringbark it.
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Mary-Lyn says...
Am I going mad or are they NO large apple trees for sale here in poor old WA? I if anyone knows of a place I can buy apple trees please let me know...I can afford to buy 25at at a time!
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MaryLyn1
Perth WA
2nd June 2008 12:38am
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kerri says...
Hi everyone,
Mary-lyn to answer your question you can get the large trees, it all depends on where you are looking, i know that some nurserys around the south west area won't keep them, they say they won't fruit here. Not cold enough. You will have to hunt around or maybe ask for a special order. For those who are interested the pinkabelle apples you can get from bunnings.
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wa
2nd June 2008 9:29pm
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kerri says...
Back again, you could try Olea Nursery they do a whole heap of fruiting trees, Benara might even have them.
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2nd June 2008 9:41pm
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aNON says...
Bunnings Albany Hwy Cannington have 12 pinkabelle trees. They are mostly pretty lopsided in growth from being too crowded in the nursery. ...good one Olea. But at 40 bucks each they are cheep!
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aNON says...
Tass 1 trees in Upper Swan has lots of big trees as does Bunnings Melville.

Saw a nice fruitung apple yesterday in Belmont.
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aNON says...
WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Advanced Nursery WANNEROO WA
Ardess Nursery ALBANY WA
Bandicoot Nursery MOUNT BARKER WA
Banyula Plants & Design DUNSBOROUGH WA
Belvedere Nursery NARROGIN WA
Blyth Garden Centre KATANNING WA
Bridgetown Landscaping Supplies BRIDGETOWN WA
Carlyle Landscapes MOSMAN PARK WA
City Farmers Bedford BEDFORD WA
City Farmers Wembley WEMBLEY WA
Collie Garden Centre COLLIE WA
Dawsons Garden World FORRESTFIELD WA
Dawsons Garden World O'CONNOR WA
Dawsons Garden World SWANBOURNE WA
Dawsons Garden World APPLECROSS WA
Dawsons Garden World JOONDALUP WA
Denmark Nursery DENMARK WA
Dutch Windmill Garden Centre JANDAKOT WA
Eden Garden Centre MERRIWA WA
Ellenby Tree Farm GNANGARA WA
Everbloom Garden Centre SAWYERS VALLEY WA
Everyday Potted Plants MARGARET RIVER WA
Fayes Garden Centre YABBERUP WA
Floraland Nursery MAHOGANY CREEK WA
Forrestdale Garden Centre FORRESTDALE WA
Fraser Garden Centre CANNINGVALE WA
Gidgie Hardware GIDGEGANUP WA
Gildern Tree Farm WATTLEUP WA
Guildford Town Nursery GUILDFORD WA
Hardware Plus MOORA WA
Herbs R Us HENLEY BROOK WA
Its Blooming Good Nursery MANDURAH WA
Jode Rural ESPERANCE WA
Killarney Nursery MANJIMUP WA
Ladybuds Gardens And Gifts MADDINGTON WA
Lake Grace Garden Supplies LAKE GRACE WA
Lena Nursery WANGARA WA
Lush Garden Gallery ALBANY WA
Mitre 10 - Bridgetown BRIDGETOWN WA
Mitre 10 - Busselton BUSSELTON WA
Meadow Springs Garden Centre MANDURAH WA
Nannup Nursery NANNUP WA
Nuralingup Gardens Nursery WITCHCLIFFE WA
Palm City Nursery WANGARA WA
Palms Galore WATTELUP WA
Parkland Garden Centre PICTON WA
Pemberton Hardware PEMBERTON WA
Poppy's Patch MOUNT BARKER WA
Professional Landscape Service HEATHRIDGE WA
SJ Plant Supply SERPENTINE WA
Soils Aint Soils BUSSELTON WA
Tim Eva's Nursery GIDGEGANNUP WA
Tony & Sons Nurseries LANDSDALE WA
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aNON
 
3rd June 2008 11:26am
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aNON says...
Pinkabelle stockists
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aNON
 
3rd June 2008 11:26am
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Craig Perring says...
Hi all,

Glad to see that people are answering the questions as they happen. You are certianly making my job easier.

I spoke to Wandilla Nursery the other day and wanted to clarify a few comments.

I had a bit of a rant on the 21st April, about Wandilla Nursery and the mis-representation of our marketing of Pinkabelle and of mis-information that they had been passing on their clients. Speaking to Caroline at Wandilla she explained to me that Wandilla Nursery did not have any trees to sell last year (they do this year) and was worried that Bob had passed on information that was incorrect or not from them. She said she certainly had not spoken to anyone about the marketing of Pinkabelle let alone had a string of complaints, simply because she had none to sell. She said she was also baffled by the comments and could not recall any of her staff saying anything along those lines to her or any customers.

I would like to apologise to Caroline at Wandilla about posting comments before clarifying and double checking with them about what was or wasn't said.

Bob, I am not saying i don't belive you but i was wondering if can you give me a call (or email: craigperring@plantnet.com.au) to clarify some of those earlier comments just say i can set the record straight with the right person about some of the specifications about Pinkabelle. We like to right info to get out the public about all our products and where we can speak to anyone who may have concerns about them.

Cheers,
Craig Perring
PlantNet
(02) 9838 1909

Cheeck out our website for stockists and product info: www.plantnet.com.au

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PlantNet
3rd June 2008 1:39pm
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aNON says...
PS Bunnings Maddington WA, have better shaped trees than Cannington.
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aNON
 
3rd June 2008 5:19pm
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Itdepends says...
"As Pete has correctly pointed out - being a PBR protected variety means you can not propagate this variety under PBR laws. For more info on PBR laws you can visit this site:
http://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/pbr/index.shtml "

I went and had a look at the website and noted the following.

"Exceptions to the breeder's right are the use of the variety privately and for non-commercial purposes, for experimental purposes, and for breeding other plant varieties. A variety can be used for these purposes irrespective of the existence of Plant Breeder's Rights."

Doesn't that mean that home gardeners can graft/propogate a PBR variety as long as it's for private use?
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Itdepends2
 
7th June 2008 7:23pm
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Anonymous says...
Wandilla must have 200 trees but they are 5 bucks dearer than bunnings, but are potted not bare rooted.
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10th June 2008 1:01pm
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Anonymous says...
Bought my third pinkabelle today, this one is for pot growing to see if it can be done !
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11th June 2008 3:59pm
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sakeena says...
hi i waas just qwondering when my pinkabelle apple tree will bear fruit and also if i buy a red delicious apple tree will they both pollinate eachother.
thanks, sakeena.
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anonymous5
goldcoast
15th June 2008 1:42pm
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sakeena says...
also i bropught it just a month ago
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goldcoast
15th June 2008 1:42pm
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lynne says...
Hi,Can anyone tell me when pinkabelles will be available in sydney.Went to nursery at Wentworthville and Bunnings at Minchinbury (syd ) and told not aavailable yet.(don't want to miss out ).
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lynne1
sydney
15th June 2008 7:30pm
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Craig Perring says...
Hi Sakeena and Lynne,

Pinkabelle's bear fruit around ANZAC day, and yes a red delicious will be OK as a pollinator.

Lynne trees are starting to get their treees. Bunning's NSW has been very slow to order but are coming through. if you go to your store and they are not there yet just ask them to order them in for you. Also check out our website www.plantnet.com.au for further stockists in your area.

Cheers.
Craig Perring
(02) 9838 1909
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PlantNet
16th June 2008 9:37am
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sakeena says...
hi was also just wondering if the tropical pple fruit tree will pollinate eachother with the pinkabelle
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anonymous5
goldcoast
16th June 2008 1:33pm
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Anonymous says...
Hi

I work at Tim Eva's Nursery in Gidgegannup (1448 Toodyay Rd) and we stock a variety of apple trees including the Pinkabelle and Ballerina apples. hope that helps.

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16th June 2008 2:24pm
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Anonymous says...
So do Ballerina apples definitely pollinate Pinkabelle apples?
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16th June 2008 2:25pm
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Anonymous says...
Yes, Tim Eva is a nice guy and the apples will pollinate.
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16th June 2008 2:41pm
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Anonymous says...
hi i was also wondering how many apples the pinkabelle apple produce without the second tree for pollination
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anonymous5
goldcoast
16th June 2008 6:13pm
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Anonymous says...
just by itself
without a pollinator
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anonymous5
goldcoast
16th June 2008 6:14pm
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Anonymous says...
i also i heard that after planting the tree it takes a year to start bearing its first fruit, that is the pinkabelle
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16th June 2008 7:34pm
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Anonymous says...
yeah.
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17th June 2008 11:07am
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Anonymous says...
hi, this is to craig perring, someone told me that my pinklabelle apple tree wont fruit where i live which is in the golcoast. she said that it wont fruit if the weather isnt cold enough here. what should i do.
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anonymous5
goldcoast
18th June 2008 9:57am
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Anonymous says...
move to a colder spot
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18th June 2008 9:11pm
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Anonymous says...
thanks good one
but i really need help
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anonymous5
goldcoast
19th June 2008 10:37am
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Anonymous says...
put ice around roots.
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19th June 2008 11:04am
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Anonymous says...
for how long
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anonymous5
goldcoast
19th June 2008 3:58pm
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Anonymous says...
600 hours
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19th June 2008 4:01pm
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Anonymous says...
With the Pinkabelle on the Gold Coast, try to place it under the shade of another tree during winter as this lowers the overall air temperature around the tree.
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19th June 2008 7:03pm
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lynne says...
Hi,went to Bunnings to pick up my pinkabelles today and came home with an angel peach as well,my question to Craig Perring is whats the best way to plant angel peach in large pot or inground(if inground in corner of backyard where it gets mainly morning sun).Any advice would be appreciated.
cheers lynne.
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lynne1
sydney
19th June 2008 9:48pm
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Anonymous says...
check out www.davewilson.com and they have all the info youse need.
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20th June 2008 10:35am
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B says...
Just wondering if there is any update on the availability of dwarf cross pollinator apple trees in WA. Is the only option currently to have two pinkabelle apple trees?
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B
Perth
23rd June 2008 1:45pm
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Anonymous says...
None to my knowledge, you can get ballerina crab apple to cross pollinate.

I will have M27 plants next summer for sale.
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23rd June 2008 2:18pm
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Anonymous says...
2 pinkabelles are the same as 1 after all they were grafted from the same source tree.!
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23rd June 2008 2:19pm
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Anonymous says...
you mean because it has been grafted by its own tree it doesnt need a pollinator
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23rd June 2008 8:44pm
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Anonymous says...
No, not at all.

Think of it as ripping your arm off
and cloning it on to another person.

It's still your arm genetically.

Thus, it can not be classed as a pollinator as it is not genetically different.

Luckily the pinkabelle is partially self fertile, so 1 tree will be OK-ish.

I had a flower come in late Feb where I cinctured the trunk, it could ahve only been pollinated by itself, and had all 5 seeds in the fruit, indicating succesful pollination.
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24th June 2008 10:49am
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B says...
Thanks - i will wait and get an M27 pollinator then.... i have only just bought my tree so i wouldn't expect a lot of fruit in the first year anyway. Do you mean summer 2008 or 2009?
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B
Perth
24th June 2008 12:43pm
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Anonymous says...
2009, 100 bucks each.
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25th June 2008 10:33am
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B says...
anyone in perth got a granny smith cutting i can graft onto my pinkabelle in the meantime?
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B
Perth
25th June 2008 11:53am
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Anonymous says...
That would result in a full size branch.

Remeber in the Pinkabelle, it't the top that is dwarfing not the bottom.
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25th June 2008 11:59am
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B says...
BUGGER!
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B
Perth
25th June 2008 12:17pm
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Anonymous says...
how many fruit will the tree produce without a pollinator
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26th June 2008 2:18pm
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John says...
Not much less, but a higher chance of mishapen fruit due to non pollinated seeds being inside to keep the hormones ticking as they should.
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John20
Perth
27th June 2008 10:34am
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Elena says...
I have a small garden and no experience with apple tree.I would like to bay two
Pinkabelle.
could somebody give me some advice how I could prepare the soil, what kind of organic compost I should use? and how far apart I should plant them ?
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Adelaide
30th June 2008 3:16am
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. says...
I read Craig Perring's post (dated 3rd June'08) with interest.

I have been to Wandilla a few times. It positioned itself as a nursery specialising in fruit trees.
The staff there seems nice enough at greeting customers initially, and they offer rather general 'common sense' advice on gardening and fruit trees.
However, they are virtually 'clueless' if you try to obtain more specific info regarding the variety / specific varieties of the fruit trees that they are selling.
The information given could vary or change from day to day, and from one staff to another - very confusing if you are a novice.
It almost seems like they don't know the products that they are selling, and asked the customer to "check websites in the internet" for more information.
Well, customers who could access and check websites for specific info don't really need to ask/approach them for advice and help, do they ?

So now, I only go there to see what is currently in stock when I happen to pass by, and purchase my trees from other nurseries that offer more helpful advice (and better after sales services).

This is not to discredit anyone person or the nursery and I am only putting my own experience in words.
In a way, I think I understand what Bob and aNON were trying to say.
And for the readers' info, I do NOT know either Bob or aNON personally except I read their posts in this forum.
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Perth
30th June 2008 11:55am
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John says...
Yeah, I asked about pots for trees and they could not say what potting mix to use, they sell some, but actually said to go elsewhere and buy "fruit tree" potting mix. Have searched and not found any, so use Yates Professional premium and have been very happy with it.

They are very dear but you can usually get what you want there. The lady told me they sell 8000 bare root trees each year, and judging by the mail orders from the country near the tills that would be about right.
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John20
Perth
30th June 2008 2:59pm
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Cate says...
I would like to purchase a dwarf apple; however, my problem is that I live in FNQLD Townsville. I was initially excited that the "Pinkerbelle" may have been Ok as it has a low chill requirement, but after having read earlier posts here, I see it has only been recommended as far north as Brisbane. Townsville winter tends to hover around 16 - 20 degrees at night (an absolute out of the ordinary temp might go as low as 6 degrees but this is unusual). Day time temps hover around 20 - 23 degrees approx. In recent years the wet has not been starting until Jan and going into Mar.
Any suggestions....
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Cate
Townsville QLD
21st July 2008 1:08pm
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John says...
Need about 5 hours under 7 degrees.
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John20
Perth
21st July 2008 1:42pm
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Anonymous says...
Apples will not grow in Townsville I'm pretty sure but who needs apples when you have Jackfruit and mangoes and Durian. Tastebuds need re-alignment and adjustment and everything will taste better than a boring old apple.
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23rd July 2008 7:36pm
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Cate says...
Durian smells pretty bad.
Thanks for the advice John.
I currently grow vanilla, coffee, tahitian limes, miracle fruit, an array of chillies and herbs, strawberries, grumichama, jaboticaba, wampee, peanut butter tree, pomegranite, 3 varieties of passion fruit, sweetie kiwi fruit, banana, coco nut, a goji (not doing so well),rosella, asparagus, dragon fruit, olive, joppa, blueberry, capsicum,and a few other strange things like the leafy plant that tastes like mushroom and the tropical spinach. They are my edibles. Not all have fruited as yet, but all are growing quite well with the newest being at least 12 months old now. My latest interest is trying to get hold of a cocoa bean tree. I hear there is a plantation in the table lands and they have grown north of Ingham (just up the road)quite successfully. I always have a new interest, but I am originally from down south on the river in SA and crave the foods I grew up with like apples, peaches and pears, but don't want to live in such a cold climate. As you can see, I'll give anything a go and so far, I have not had too many casualties!
My fingers are still crossed though that they all produce. PS we live on a block less than 500m2. I love my garden!
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Cate
Townsville QLD
24th July 2008 9:07pm
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Liz says...
We bought our 2 pinkabelles about a year ago or whenever they became available in Perth. Have them in pots as we were led to believe that these trees are ideal to be grown in a pot. We don't have any other apple trees. One pinkabelle got 2 apples I guess around Christmas and a good few weeks ago we picked the apples. They were very small but I knew pinkabelles are small. These apples are nothing like a Pink Lady which we thought they are supposed to be like a miniature version of a pink lady. They were more like the old jonathon variety or a sundowner. They were quite dark in colour, not pink like a pink lady. I am sure we don't have pinkabelle trees. It seems our apples were ready at the wrong time for a pinkabelle. If they aren't pinkabelle trees I will be very disappointed considering what we paid.
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Liz4
Perth
27th July 2008 12:43am
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Jody says...
What a very interesting read, I am new to Fruit Trees and need a little advise please!
I purchased a pinkabelle yesterday and after reading the information here, I went on a search for another miniature form for pollination. This proved to be quite a task, and then after becoming quite frustrated, I purchased a Fleming's Ballerina "Polka" I'm hoping someone can tell me what the chances of these pollinating each other will be.
Thanks so much
Jody
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Jody
Berwick, Melbourne
27th July 2008 4:19pm
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Anonymous says...
Yes it will.
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28th July 2008 10:23am
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Kitty says...
Hi, Very interesting read & now I am unsure if I wasted my money or not??
Could I please have some advice it would be much appreciated as this is my very first garden & first time at trying to grow anything! Complete Novice!!

I just bought 2 pinkabelles from bunnings, If I am reading right did I just waste my money as we are North of Perth & I don't think it gets cold enough here? Also if they did have a chance we also purchased 2 half wine barrells to plant them in will they be alright in these pots if so where abouts should I plant them (full sun, winter sun, part shade away from coastal winds etc) & how far apart & using what potting mix. I also purchased an Eureka Lemon, Tahitian Lime & imperial Mandarin also to put in Wine Barrells if anyone had any advice on these as well it would be most helpful (or a recomendation of a good gardening book :))
Thanks so much
Kitty
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Kitty
Yanchep WA
3rd August 2008 1:53pm
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John says...
give it a go.
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John20
Perth
4th August 2008 11:46am
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kate says...
I have a Pinkabell in a pot. It has been doing well for almost a year now & has just begun coming into flower again. I did'nt get any fruit on it last year, as expected, but I also have a dwarf Granny Smith & a regular Pink Lady , also dwarf. I believe the Pinkabelle is exactly the same as the Pink Lady apples in taste, but they don't need other apple trees to pollinate. I hope mine fruit this year...for once, they're all coming into blossum together...nothing like a fresh apple , just picked...yum
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central coast
29th September 2008 6:26am
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Jenny says...
I bought two pinkabelles over a year ago. There were flowers on both but all but one fell off. I think the cause was strong winds. I ended up with one delicious tasting apple. I called it my $100.00 apple. Both pots have flowers at the moment which I move as soon as it gets windy. I'm hoping for more than one apple this season!
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Sydney north
30th September 2008 8:04pm
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Mark says...
I've got a Pinkabelle as well as a Golden Dorset and a "Tropical Apple" variety in large pots. I didn't think the other two varieties would cross-pollinate with the Pinkabelle, but because its supposed to be partly self-pollinating, I thought I'd give it a go and see what happens. The Tropical one flowered first, followed by the Golden Dorset, followed by the Pinkabelle, with the flowering times overlapping.

I only got them earlier this year so I'm not sure if we'll get any fruit just yet or even at all in this climate, so we'll wait and see!
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Mark9
Tingalpa, Brisbane
4th October 2008 9:44am
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alison says...
is it too late to get a pinkabelle now for planting. i went to bunnings yesterday and they are out of stock and said they won't get any more now. are there any other nurseries in this area that received stock?
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alison3
newcastle
6th October 2008 10:10am
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Chris says...
Mark,

sounds like the Golden Dorsett should be OK to pollinate the Pinkabelle then which is good news because I've got a Golden Dorsett and Anna which are both established and just put in a pinkabelle very recently. I will be interested to hear if your pinkabelle bears many apples.
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Chris13
Banyo, Brisbane
9th October 2008 10:11pm
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Gavin says...
Hi all,

Glad I found this forum and I hope I am posting on the right one.

I have purchased my first Pinkabelle tree a couple of weeks ago and it must love my location as I have lots of flowers on it already.

However, I have to admit to being a somewhat naive gardener and not knowing a great deal about plants etc.

I have noticed that there are little tiny things moving along the flowers. They light coloured things only about 1-2mm long. You'd hardly know they were there but upon closer inspection you can see that there are a few of them.

Is that wrong? I'm guessing that I don't want them there so can anyone suggest what I should do to keep the plant under some sort of pest control, naturally preferably.

Also, someone suggested that I need to put a white net over it. Is that right?

Is there any good links that someone might have for me to read about how to grow an apple tree successfully?

Many thanks everyone!
Gavin.
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Gavin
Melbourne
12th October 2008 3:01pm
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Mark says...
Gavin,

If I had to guess, I would say they're probably aphids of some sort.

If so, some eco-oil or similar can be mixed with water and sprayed on the tree, especially the new growth.

Hope this helps.
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Mark9
Tingalpa, Brisbane
12th October 2008 5:06pm
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Karry says...
Hi am looking for Blueberries but have been told not to get the rabbit eye varieties.

We are looking for the smaller growing varieties can anyone tell us where their is some stock of non rabbit eye blueberry varieties in Perth Metro Area please? ta :o)

We would not want them to grow more than a meter in height and want to plant them between our citrus.

Suggestions and advice welcomed.

Our Kei Apples we bought are growing but still no thorns, we are looking forward to our first crop next year.
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Karry
Southern Suburbs - Perth WA
15th October 2008 10:22am
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Pauline says...
My pinkabelle tree bought in the winter seems to be doing well. I did wonder around with a cotton but for the first lot of flowers that opened, but then went away for a couple of weeks. It looks like a few of the ones I cotton budded have pollinated and are fattening up, although the ones I didn't have or are falling off. So, maybe helping the tree along is the way to go (if you have no life like me).

Now I know you shouldn't really let your tree grow any fruit in the first year or two so it's energy into growing roots and branches, but I don't think I am going to be able to stop myself.
Does anyone have any advice on how many would be too many apples to leave to grow on a new tree?
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Pauline
Adelaide
19th October 2008 5:51pm
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Anonymous says...
My pinkabelle is covered in flowers.
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20th October 2008 12:07pm
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terri says...
I have read that apple trees require cold winters and mild summers. Toodyay gets very cold in winter but very hot in summer (approx 5C hotter than perth), not uncommon to get many days of 40C plus. Could I expect apples (or pears for that matter), to grow ok in that type of climate? Also, can anyone tell me how many of the Pinkabelle trees would be needed to get the same amount of fruit that would grow on 1 x Pink Lady apple tree? (roughly).
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terri
toodyay WA
30th October 2008 11:08pm
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John says...
Terri

They will grow Ok, if you can keep up the water during summer.

Ihave 2 trees and they will yield about 100 fruits bewteen them in their second year, work oout your requirements from that.

J
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John20
Perth
31st October 2008 10:21am
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Anonymous says...
all of my flowers fell off, not very self fertile obviously.
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8th November 2008 10:02pm
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Elizabeth says...
Anon., if your Pinkabelle was new this year it is very normal for young trees to flower but not set fruit as they are putting their energy into growing branches. My Pinkabelle bore only one apple its first year, this year it looks to have set a good dozen or so and I expect it to further improve again next season (though mine has several other apples to cross pollinate with too).
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Sydney
9th November 2008 12:28am
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Anonymous says...
nah, second year monster plants,
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9th November 2008 9:25am
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Pauline says...
Mine is in it's first year and after careful polination with a cotton bud I have a fair few baby apples growing, I even had to take some off, it is just a baby tree after all. :)
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Pauline
Adelaide
10th November 2008 6:08pm
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John says...
My lateste pinkabelle (the third) was transplanted from the 12" pot I was holding it into a 20" pot for permanent.

Bugger all root growth, i'm thinking some
seasol will be needed.!
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John20
Perth
12th November 2008 9:42am
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Anonymous says...
wandilla will have frsh stocks in december.
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27th November 2008 9:19am
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Anonymous says...
Wandilla got their stocks, they look to be Bunnings returns that were not sold.

ie they are still flowering which is a sign of lack of chill, and I would not expect this in stuff straight up from Manjimup. As Olea is the licensed grower.
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1st December 2008 8:50am
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Gavin says...
Hi Mark,

Thanks for getting back to me. I must have incorrect settings on this forum because I only got an email yesterday!

Unfortunately the flowers died off and no apples for this season.

Thanks for the information. I can't really see any little insects there now but i will get some eco-oil in preparation for a return.

Thanks,
Gavin.
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Melbourne
8th December 2008 4:37am
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Gavin says...
Hi all,

Just wondering if anyone can advise me. I'm using recycled water from laundry and showers on my lawn and also on my Pinkabelle. Does anyone know if I shouldn't be watering it with recycled water? It doesn't appear to be hating it but I did read somewhere that I shouldn't use recycled water on ground vegetables and I didn't know if that was a general rule.

Thanks all,
Gavin.
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Melbourne
8th December 2008 4:40am
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peter says...
if using laundry water on plants you
need to use a certain type of
detergent that doesnt have phoshates
and other certain things in them.
there are 3 or 4 differant ones but i
dont know their names.
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peter30001
adelaide
8th December 2008 5:54pm
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Jantina says...
Planet Ark has some garden safe laundry powders.The supermarkets carry them, they are not expensive. The warnings about recycled water and vegetables is more about human health,e.g. E Coli being in the recycled water and then being splashed on vegetables which somebody might eat without washing it thoroughly and so get sick. Or say someone was a carrier of Hep. A,their shower water could spread Hep. A via unwashed vegetables that had been watered with water they had showered in.The chances of this actually happening are not very high, but these days health officials have to cover all bases or someone is likely to sue them.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
8th December 2008 6:52pm
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John says...
Apple trees have a high phosphorus requirement, so I would not worry a lot about using the fancy pants powders.

They are mainly aimed at not polluting waterways with phosphorous and casuing blue green algae blooms.
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John20
Perth
9th December 2008 9:57am
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Pauline says...
Not to mention the build up of detergents changing the pH of your soil over time. Of course this would depend on what you had already as to if this would be a problem.
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Pauline
Adelaide
10th December 2008 8:18pm
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david says...
when is the best time to plant the pinkabelle tree
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david11
adelaide
26th December 2008 6:46pm
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Anonymous says...
Any time if its in ab bag. winter if bare rooted.
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27th December 2008 9:07am
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Pauline says...
Mine is doing great.
I will be suprised if the apples take until anzac day to be ready, they seem to be getting big so quick.
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Pauline
Adelaide
27th December 2008 8:30pm
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John says...
Check the background colour out, it should loose nearly all traces of green and seeds should be brown, otherwise a bit too tart !
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John20
Perth
30th December 2008 2:28pm
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Donna says...
Hi
We have had a pinkabelle tree growing in a pot in the backyard in full sun for about 6 mths. There are at least 3 small apples growing on it but two have a sticky substance on them and one has some very small brown spots, also some of the leaves have been partially eaten. Also should the trunk and brances have small whiteish spots on them? Please help.
Thanks Donna
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Donna4
Sydney
1st January 2009 2:17pm
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John says...
Sounds like apple scab combined with pear slugs.
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John20
Perth
2nd January 2009 11:33am
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RolFlor a says...
The pinkabelle is sold by daleysfruit.
http://daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/apple.htm
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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health101orgarticles1
Ovahere
6th January 2009 5:11pm
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Clare says...
Hi Craig,
I need some very basic advice on how to care for my pinkabelle. Should it be in full sun? It very hot here in the summer. (Today was 41 degrees). Or should it have partial shade. Does it tolerate frost, because we always have some in the winter. Does it like to be well watered? For example, moist not wet, or dry to touch.
With thanks,
Clare
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Clare2
Wagga Wagga
7th January 2009 10:57pm
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Anonymous says...
craig dont live here man/
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10th January 2009 7:59am
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Rob Hart says...
Hey Guys,

just picked up a couple of pinkabelle apple trees after reading this thread
and planted them with heaps of sheep/cow poo and water. Should i be expecting any yield this year? and around what time of year is harvest time?

Cheers rob.
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Rob Hart
East Vic Park
11th January 2009 5:56pm
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Pauline says...
If it doesn't have apples on it already you have missed the boat for this year. They have their blossom in spring.

I read somewhere that you harvest at about anzac day, but mine seem like they will be giant by then.
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Pauline
Adelaide
11th January 2009 11:29pm
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Rob Hart says...
Hello Pauline,

thank you very much for the reply!
i'll be looking foward to see some pics of your tree and apples from it

Speak soon
Rob.
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Rob Hart
East Vic Park
12th January 2009 7:49am
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Craig Perring - PlantNet says...
Hello all - plenty of posts that have come in over time with many people offering advice which is good. I notice there is many questions that people are directed at me and i would suggest that you email me directly to get a quicker response!! Although I do try and get on here every couple of months and try and answer as many questions as possible sometimes it difficult to get to them all at once. My email address is craigperring@plantnet.com.au or phone me on (02) 9838 1909

Happy new year to all...

PS For those in Western Australia we will have every variety of apple you could dream of in a dwarf range by 2011 (i know it sounds like a long time away but it will come quick!)

I look forward to receiveing your call and emails.
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Craig from PlantNet
 
21st January 2009 3:32pm
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Phil says...
Don;t bother I emailed and never got a reply twice.
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Manjump
27th January 2009 1:56pm
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louise says...
1: my pinkie is one long stick should i cut the top off for side grouth?
2: my flowers all dropped off i think i need a polinator i found a dwalf polka and bolero apple no dwalf granny smiths will they do?
i have it in a big black pot will it get too hot?
thanks for your help
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blossom
kalamunda
7th February 2009 12:36am
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BigBOB says...
Lou

Cincture above the buds to get side shoots.

Not uncommon to fall off early in life,
dwarf granny comming in 2010. Ballerina
are good for poll esp the crab.

Yes, i use terracotta plastic from Wandila.
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7th February 2009 8:36am
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PlantNet says...
Hi Lousie,

1: There is no need to prune your Pinkabelle. They tend to grow up before growing out. They will branch (see example picture on this blog). Remeber they only get to about a metre wide andare spur bearing. Be patient and it will grow to an ice shape. they have a avery nice natural shape.

2. Pinkabelle is partially self fertile btu benefits from cross pollination. Dwarf grannies do work however they are not available in WA at present. We are hoping to have some in 2010-2011. As Bob has staed Crab apples - any type are good pollinators.

Quick one to Phil - sorry mate i have nto recieved any emails from you? (got one from Damo) but nothing from you at all i am sorry - unless it has gone into my spam which i do check but things can easily be overlooked in there! please try and email me again as i would like to be able to answer your question - double check the email address you are sending to is right: craigperring@plantnet.com.au
If not give me a call on (02) 9838 1909 and i can answer any questions you need answering. Again sorry for not receiving you email but some things weird things happen in cyberspace!!

Cheers,
Craig Perring
PlantNet (02) 9838 1909
craigperring@plantnet.com.au
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Craig from PlantNet
 
13th February 2009 12:28pm
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louise says...
thanks, I will just keep on singing too it and looking forward to the day of apple pie :)
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blossom
kalamunda
16th February 2009 5:07pm
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Pauline says...
Well my 6 apples had been doing great on my tree which I bought in the winter. Unfortunetly 4 of them seemed to have started cooking in the heatwave and have bruised areas, and now possums have been chomping on one of the two good ones left. So now I have one apple which may make it.
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Pauline
Adelaide
18th February 2009 5:18pm
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Jantina says...
Good luck Pauline, don't give up. We grow more than we need and by the time the birds, possums and rats have had a go there's a bit left for us. It's trench warfare out there.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
18th February 2009 8:13pm
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Pauline says...
OK, really odd thing now, my pinkabelle is covered in blossom which is just opening. A week before autumn!

I am assuming this is not normal???
It still has 4 apples on it.
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Pauline
Adelaide
21st February 2009 8:38pm
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Jimmy says...
Its a sign of not enough chill, those buds remained dormant until now.
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22nd February 2009 2:12pm
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Jantina says...
Hi Pauline, every so often apple trees in particular do this, but the fruit never comes to anything. I'm sure there is a scientific explanation for it but I don't know what it is. Enjoy your blossom.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
22nd February 2009 2:15pm
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Jon says...
Thinking about getting a Pinkabelle, Dwarf Jonathan and Dwarf Granny Smith.

Will these flower at the same times and pollinate each other?

Thank-you,

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
26th February 2009 7:22pm
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Jimmy says...
Yeah, this is actually the ideal combination.
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28th February 2009 1:30pm
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Jon says...
I bought a Pinkabelle today and it was much taller than I expected. I am impressed, considering the price.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
1st March 2009 8:40pm
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Freddy says...
Awesome
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6th March 2009 5:16pm
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Jimbob says...
when are pink bella's ready in Poith?
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Perth
19th March 2009 3:17pm
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david says...
how much direct sunlight should the pinkabelle receive during the day thanks for you help.david
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3rd April 2009 4:14pm
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Jimmy says...
Without being stupid, lots.

ie the more the betetr as sun makes flower buds.
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9th April 2009 6:06pm
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louise says...
well i chopped the top off and now i am said but for some funny reason it maid it flower at the top ?? and in march?? oh well its done now!! happy gardening
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perth
14th April 2009 11:50pm
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Liz says...
Hi - can anyone tell me how many hours chill Pinkabelles and Granny Smiths need to fruit? ...best information I've found has been "medium chill" and "temperate" - has anyone successfully got a decent amount of fruit on the Perth flats (aka Perth Coastal Plain for people who didn't grow up in the hills...) ;-)

According to the Ag Dept, we get ~290-350 hours on the flats, compared to ~440-680 in the hills, so it makes a bit of difference...
http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/content/HORT/FN/CP/POMEFRUITS/Winter_Chilling_Farmnote.pdf

I bought a Pinkabelle from Bunnings a little while back, with the intention of getting a Granny to fertilise it, but if they're not going to fruit, I guess I'd be better off putting something else in the space!

Thanks! :-)
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Liz
Thornlie (Perth) WA
20th April 2009 3:28pm
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Tibor says...
my mum grows one good in the kelmscott foothills.
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20th April 2009 9:07pm
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Pip says...
Hi all

when you have the Pinkabelle and a pollinator, do you need to hand pollinate??? Or do they naturally pollinate each other?

Silly question but I want to be sure.

Thanks.
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Pip
Newcastle
21st April 2009 11:57am
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Jimmy says...
The bees do it for you as long as weather sunny.
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21st April 2009 3:06pm
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Pauline says...
I hand polinated mine as I read so many people complain that they didn't get any fruit. I only got my tree last winter and had 8 apples forming. I removed two so it wouldn't use up too much of the trees strengh in it's first year. I possum ate another one earlier in the year and one cooked in the heatwave. I ate one a couple of weeks ago (it was lovely) and had to pick the last two off a couple of days ago as a possum ate another one!

I will hand polinate next year too. :)
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Pauline
Adelaide
25th April 2009 6:40pm
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melly says...
I bought a pinkabelle last year from bunnings, I am right on the beach and salt and wind are usually a problem with lots of plants, but my pinkabelle is going very well, it is in a large pot. It is pretty much a stick with leaves but has 12 apples on it. I think a couple are nearly ready but not sure how to tell. It is still flowering though and there is fruit at all stages. Should I take the smaller fruit off so it can concentrate it's energy on the others or on growing? Should it still be flowering?
Also if I wanted to plant it when would be the ideal time. I am really enjoying this tree and was so excited when it fruited. I only have 1 apple tree and have been looking for a dwarf granny smith, but maybe someone has another aplpe close by or else it self pollinated pretty well
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melly
scarborough perth
8th May 2009 6:24pm
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amanda says...
I have a Pink lady (same diff) and was told I needed another low chill for better pollination (Fuygi..whatever!) my fuygi had lots of fruit this year (at 2yrs old) the pink lady - none. Take out the "king" apple (one in the centre) of a group helps to get better fruit, however you should not let any of your trees bear fruit in their first 2 yrs - it's at the expense of the plant (frame and roots) think of pregnancy!! Be brave and lose the fruit bar maybe one and your tree will be better for it!(we live on the coast of WA too) They are ready when you can slighty twist them and the stem breaks. Take them inside for further ripening.
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amanda19
geraldton WA
11th May 2009 12:37am
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melly says...
thanks I will bite the bullet and remove the fruit, some look nearly ready anyway. Is your fuygi a dwarf? If so where did you get it beacause I am looking for a dwarf pollinater. Thanks

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melly
scarborough perth
11th May 2009 3:19pm
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amanda says...
melly - no, neither of mine dwarfs (but grafted) have no idea 'bout rootstock either - most producers don't bother with this slightly important bit of info! very frustrating. Sorry i can't help - we get buggar all up here.
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amanda19
geraldton WA
14th May 2009 8:23pm
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jacelyn says...
Hi everyone, wondering if someone can help me - I am new to gardening and recently bought a Pinkabelle for my east balcony (it's in a very large pot). I guess my first question is will it be ok to stay where it only gets direct sun until midday? Secondly, I noticed today some little holes on some of the leaves. I've included pictures of both the front and the back of one of them. Is this normal (it was blowing a gale a few nights back and I don't know what wind damage woud look like) or is it some kind of disease? Any kind of help would be much appreciated! Thanks
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Jacelyn
Scarborough perth
17th May 2009 5:42pm
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Jimmy says...
Looks like wind damage, the only othe rthing is pear n cherry slugs but they more skelontonise than hollow out.

Got apples on it in scabs?
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19th May 2009 1:02pm
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Lisa says...
Not sure either as I have this on my stella cherry, apples, mulberry as well. It only appeared after a few windy days last week. I am thinking wind damage also??
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Lisa
Blue Mountains NSW
19th May 2009 1:37pm
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jacelyn says...
Thanks guys - I guess I'll assume it's wind damage until someone says otherwise! No apples yet Jimmy - I've only had it 2 weeks and it's my first fruit tree so fingers crossed I manage to keep it alive long enough to find out if it will fruit!
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Jacelyn
scarborough perth
19th May 2009 4:14pm
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amanda says...
I have problems with this on my apples too - also on my loquat and most of my stone fruit - by the end of summer (the hot easterlies will do this). The new growth that comes in the cooler weather is always fine. The leaf colour is healthy looking, but as you got the plant recently - it may need time to toughen up a bit. Nursery plants are often well cared for and/or kept under shade cloth.
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amanda19
geraldton WA
20th May 2009 5:49pm
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Liz says...
Our 2 Pinkabelle trees have quite a bit of fruit on but we won't get to eat any as some pest got to the trees. The apples got quite sticky and some of them have gone soft and mushy but that could be from getting burnt. Whatever the bug is it get right into the apple. Our first year we got 2 small apples on one of the trees but they weren't anything like a pink lady and this year both trees have a decent amount of fruit, some smallish apples and some are very big. I still don't think our trees are Pinkabelle somehow. At the moment I wish I hadn't wasted the money on buying them. Does anyone know what bug causes the stickiness?
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Liz4
Kingsley(Perth)
26th May 2009 12:14am
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Jimmy says...
fruit fly? or soem other piecing bug, the sticky is a reaction to puncturing.
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29th May 2009 3:14pm
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Liz says...
Thanks Jimmy, I didn't think it was fruit fly as hadn't seen any but something was going on with the leaves as well and I think some little bug was eating the leaves. I'm a hopeless gardener. Hopefully one day we'll get some decent apples that we can eat but what I'm now concerned about is, if our trees aren't really Pinkabelle then they shouldn't be in pots. I bought those trees believing them to be Pinkabelle as we don't have anywhere to plant apple trees in the garden.
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Kingsley(Perth)
1st June 2009 12:51pm
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Van says...
I'd like to purchase one of these, however I would like to have it in a pot, can anyone steer me in the right direction regarding ideal pot size and best method.
Thanks!
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Van1
Melbourne
11th June 2009 10:48pm
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Jimmy says...
I do it, yates sella 50 litre pot.

Its tuscan style in square or round.

Very sexy.
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12th June 2009 11:17am
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Van says...
I have seen those online but I think the 500mm is for the top and not the base. What size does the pot need to be at the bottom? I have been told about 45cm but am struggling to find a plastic one of that diameter at the bottom. Is anything smaller going to be no good?
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Van1
Melbourne
14th June 2009 6:17pm
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Jimmy says...
I use the pots above in round version for all my trees in pots approx 20 and they all grow good

apples, citrus peach, necto, cherries etc.
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15th June 2009 2:37pm
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Jimmy says...
My apples are finally ripe kelmscott WA mid July 2009.
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22nd June 2009 12:42pm
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Jimmy says...
More
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22nd June 2009 2:26pm
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Jimmy says...
D'oh, wrong one.
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22nd June 2009 2:27pm
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Liz says...
Hi - if you're after big, UV-resistant plant pots, check out http://www.gardencityplastics.com/advanced.htm - they have up to 250 litre, 840mm diameter pots. (I think the 580mm dia ones I bought a while back were ~$35 each - I got a note about a price increase of ~5% recently, but they'd still be WAY cheaper than what I could find elsewhere.) I've planted six blueberry plants in them - nice and sturdy, and come in a few colours.
Cheers,
Liz
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Liz
Thornlie (Perth) WA
13th July 2009 10:52pm
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Jason says...
Wow, just around the corner from me in Canning Vale. Im just off Nicholson Road
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Jason1
Perth
14th July 2009 12:15am
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Helen says...
I saw some bare rooted fruit trees in wantirna market for $10 per tree with lot of apple type to choose from.
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20th July 2009 4:15pm
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martin says...
I have a similiar problem to previous author and am mystified as to the cause. My local nursery did not have any answers. I do not feel hot winds are the answer.
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martin1
gold coast
22nd July 2009 2:14pm
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Peter the permie says...
Hi Helen , you get what you pay for , these will be on seedling rootstocks and can grow 6m high & 6m wide whats the cost of a chainsaw to prune them in the future.
look for heritage apples on dwaft rootstocks only every need secators, plus they have other qualities like fruiting in 2-4 years not 7-10 like the ones you saw.
the Heritage fruits society has a couple of hundred vars to buy at the grafting days for no more than $18
see www,petethepermie.com for more info
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Peter the permie
monbulk vic
22nd July 2009 6:46pm
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Jimmy says...
Looks like classic pear slug.
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23rd July 2009 12:51pm
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jacelyn says...
Hi Jimmy - your apples look amazing!! My pinkabelle is losing its leaves - they look like they're progressively 'drying' out and falling off. The soil feels moist so I wouldn't have thought it was dehydrated...

I bought a dwarf granny/red fuji for cross pollination this weekend which only has 1 tiny leaf on it - I had thought then perhaps it was normal for the pinkabelle to drop leaves being winter, but now seeing your pics, perhaps not?

I'm scared I might have killed my tree already!
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Jacelyn
scarborough perth
27th July 2009 12:14pm
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Jimmy says...
They burn the leaves off the new plants to make them salebale and neat looking, plus they were grown in Donnybrook with all that cold for Tass 1.
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27th July 2009 4:47pm
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jacelyn says...
Thanks for the info! Well at least I know that the Tass1 tree is still alive hahaha - so is it then ok for the Pinkabelle to have very few leaves as well (they have been falling off since May)?
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Jacelyn
scarborough perth
27th July 2009 5:10pm
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Trevor says...
I know it's late, but can anyone provide me with a few Gravenstein cuttings for grafting - I had some arranged, but it fell through. Any help will be much appreciated - and I can provide some Pink Lady if anyone is interested.
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Trevor1
Mitcham
27th July 2009 10:14pm
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Warren D. says...
It's Autumn people! Apples should start yellowing just after harvest then drop off. That means give them a good dose of trace element fertilizer which will help with bud strength for the next season. By the way as Pink Lady is trade marked I wouldn't be grafting without a license for each tree.
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Warren D1
Perth Hills
28th July 2009 4:13pm
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Jimmy says...
Ahhh, you hillbillies with all the chill make me laugh.

Ps Just call it Cripps Pink and your OK.
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Jimmy
 
30th July 2009 3:14pm
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Itdepends says...
As long as its for private use there's no law against propogating it (selling the plants though would be a definite no no)
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30th July 2009 9:54pm
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Trevor says...
Agreed, strictly private use of cuttings only. (And my apple "orchard" consists of one dwarf Granny Smith and one dwarf Jonathon/Pink Lady - don't think I'm much of a threat to commercial growers!)
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1st August 2009 1:53pm
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Peter the permie says...
Hi trevour contact Peter at Heritage fruit society we have gravenstein and 400 other apples you can graft with. call 0418 665 880
sunday 2/8 we will be at Petty's templestowe with all scion at the grafting day 1-4pm
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Peter the permie
monbulk vic
1st August 2009 5:45pm
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Craig says...
Hi all,

Quick update to let you know we are still here but very busy with our Winter stock. We are getting an "early spring" which proves difficult for bare root trees! Most questions have been answered in the forum by the regulars so thanks to all who provide info. If you have any specific questions please do not hesitate to contact me on (02) 9838 1909....regarding the discussions about leaves - they should be falling off and if they haven't i would suggest you pull them off so the plant shuts down. With Spring around the corner i would be doing this sooner rather than later as they will be sure to grow back rather quickly.

Cheers
Craig Perring
PlantNet
(02) 9838 1909
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Craig from PlantNet
PlantNet
3rd August 2009 10:12am
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Jimmy says...
My plant in Perth is sprouting fresh growth after deloiation in may.
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4th August 2009 12:11pm
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Jimmy says...
Craig

Whats next from youse guys?

I own mutliples of all your products except the angel peach which is not very sexy to my mind.

I want more !!!
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Jimmy
 
4th August 2009 12:16pm
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Craig says...
Hi Jimmy sounds like you may be hitting Spring early too...Sydney is having lovely weather albeit a bit early for my liking! Would like to see winter finish off properly.

Angel peaches are nice! Very sweet. We have a sub tropical version (this one is yellow fleshed) that will be available in Perth around October.

Without giving away all of our trade secrets, we do have some new fruit trees coming out in October / November (in fact WA will be the only state to stock them so early), which will be a new variety of Plumcot (plum x apricot) and also a new medium chill (450hrs) apricot. Limited stocks will be released this October / November so keep an ear to the ground.... our website may be the best to hear first hand what is happenening www.plantnet.com.au

We also have some exciting news that will make Western Australian gardeners pleased - especially apple lovers.....but you will have to wait until next year before we can get into that.

I am available anytime to chat on (02) 9838 1909 or email me direct with any questions - info@plantnet.com.au

Cheers
Craig
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Craig from PlantNet
PlantNet
10th August 2009 2:14pm
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Jimmy says...
Thanx Craig, berry helpful.
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10th August 2009 3:23pm
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Tiggerbow says...
Hi Craig,
I am preparing to buy a Angel Peach when it is released in October. Can't wait for that one : o )
Glad there are some positives to being in WA for a change !
Very naughty for teasing us with your tid bit of info re the apples.
I will await more info !

Thanks !
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Tiggerbow
Perth WA
10th August 2009 3:31pm
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Jimmy says...
http://www.ars.usda.gov/IS/pr/2000/000613.htm
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10th August 2009 4:22pm
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Jimmy says...
Angel Peaches are in stockt today at Bunnings, dawsons etc.

The other stuff is later.
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10th August 2009 4:24pm
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Tiggerbow says...
Hiya Jimmy,
Is this the subtropical Angel Peach?.
I am in Perth and it is fairly warm here. My Dwarf Peach does well but I think I'd be better off with a subtropical Angel rather that the 'original' one.

Cheers
Jodie : o )
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Tiggerbow
Perth WA
10th August 2009 5:02pm
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Marie says...
Hi Craig,

I live in Western Australia and I have planted a few dwarf fruit trees. I was wondering if the chill factor here is low enough for the pinkabelle apples. Would it also be cool enough for the granny smith. The area where I would like to plant them is quite narrow, would this be o.k?
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Marie5
Western Australlia
13th August 2009 2:18pm
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Jimmy says...
Anywhere from perth south should be OK.

Hills obviously a lot better.
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13th August 2009 2:38pm
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Craig from PlantNet says...
Morning all,

Yes apple news is good for WA. Just have to be patient. Don't forget there are already columnar apples in WA that are suitable pollinators for Pinkaballe.

Subtropical Angel Peach will not be avialble until Octoberish - the way the weather is it may even be earlier.

Had plenty of reports that Pinkabelle is fruiting like mad (with cross pollinations) in Rockingham and Freemantle! which suggests to me that Perth will be fine for chill. Like Jimmy said hills are better....planting on the Southern side of the house can alsways help with chill as it tends to be a bit cooler there for obvious reasons. Pinkabelle is a temperate apple not a high chill one.

Marie - narrow gaps are fine. Trees are dwarf (as you know) Pinkabelle will only grow approximately 1m wide so that is what you will need to work off with reagrds to space. Dwarf grannies can tend to be a bit wider but can be kept to a desired size fairly easily if they are on a dwarf rootstock - again the columnar apples could also help. Narrow spot - does this mena less light?

A little trick (and something i did last year as i did not have a pollinator) for those who want to wait for a dwarf tree but want something to cross pollinate their Pinkabelle's this Spring - Go and buy / find (ask neighbours?) some apple blossom and place in a vase (admitedlly i used a pint glass!) underneath your trees and let the bees do their thing...you can also get a small brush and hand pollinate. Cheating i know but gets the job done.

Hope this helps.

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PlantNet
17th August 2009 9:45am
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Jimmy says...
Dawsons are selling M26 granny smiths for $39.95 ex Olea Nsy, Lots of stock.
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17th August 2009 11:51am
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Pauline says...
Thanks Craig. What do you recommend for pruning of a young pinkabelle?
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Pauline
Adelaide
18th August 2009 9:30pm
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sylvia says...
Have read through this entire thread! Great info, thanks everyone! Am moving near Orange, NSW, where there is plenty of chill for apples, (a huge industry around there) but if Pinkabelle is a temperate apple, could it be too cold? It snows lightly on my place sometimes.

Also, I'd like to plant apples to harvest for the longest possible time as part of a permaculture setup.

Three questions - can anyone recommend other apple varieties with great taste, keeping qualities and/or hardiness?

What kind of protection from birds works best? I was thinking of a permanent frame of star spikes and PVC tubes to support netting when needed.

Is it possible to find Bramley apples in Australia? I have fond memories of baked Bramley apples, stuffed with sultanas, butter and a little cinnamon from my time living in England. The best taste!
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20th August 2009 9:47am
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Craig from PlantNet says...
Hi all,

Pauline - you should not have to prune Pinkabelle - call me to discuss if you like as t may be easier to talk to you in person - (02) 9838 1909.

Sylvia - Orange is fine to grow Pinkabelle. We have trees in Bathurst where we have many varieties of all fruit trees - low chill, temperate and high chill.the Pinkabelle fruits very well there.

Birds is a tough one - many different thoughts on this maybe one for googling? I use nets but am only talking a few trees. There is one product that i have heard of that is humane and appears to work (although i have never used it) is called D-Ter. you can enquire about it on (02) 9589 0703.

We can source many apples through our nursery network - maybe best to tell me exactly what you are looking once you have worked it out and I can make some enquiries..this website has some variety adn seasonal info: http://www.oneadaysuperfood.com.au/apple_facts/apple_varieties_and_seasonality_information/

call me if you would like to discuss further.
Cheers
Craig
PlantNet
(02) 9838 1909
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Craig from PlantNet
PlantNet
24th August 2009 9:28am
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Pauline says...
Thanks Craig.

Sylvia, I have seen a few English people looking for Bramley apples, and it seems you can't get them in Oz. You have me craving bramley apple pies now damn you! :D
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Pauline
Adelaide
24th August 2009 6:35pm
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Jimmy says...
TASS 1 trees sell them on dwarf rootstock.
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25th August 2009 10:59am
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Loz says...
Craig, I need help.

Last year I purchased 4 pinkabelle trees. I have planted them into deep and wide limestone pots. They are positioned in full sun and the pots are on pavers.

They are slowly dying. I gave them plenty of water in the summer and the rain is keeping them watered at the moment but im worried I've done/doing something wrong.

The leaves are turning dark and are now falling off. :( HELP!!!
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Loz1
Perth WA
27th August 2009 2:14pm
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jacelyn says...
Hi Loz

Mine has done the same thing.. I think from what I've read here, they're meant to shut down over winter - Craig said:

"regarding the discussions about leaves - they should be falling off and if they haven't i would suggest you pull them off so the plant shuts down. With Spring around the corner i would be doing this sooner rather than later as they will be sure to grow back rather quickly."

I hope that's right cos I pulled all the leaves off mine (they seemed to be dying off anyway)! I'm really looking forward to spring so I can see whether my pinkabelle is still alive or not hahaha
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Jacelyn
scarborough perth
28th August 2009 11:47am
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amanda says...
Hi Loz n jacelyn - i have cut n pasted this from "pink lady pollination" topic:

Jimmy says...
Ther are two schools of thought, the first is to pull off in autumn to allow the buds to get the max chill.

the other is to pull off in spring (like now) and then the tree will bud up and bloom within 3 weeks.

I have tried both and there seems to be no diff yet,


In Jimmys edibles page he says he used to work at a fruit tree research station - so the advice is sound...I keep forgetting to do my apple trees tho'!! I hope I am not too late :-/
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
28th August 2009 7:03pm
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Marie says...
Thank you Craig, much appreciated. Do you know where in Perth I can buy the columnar apples? The narrow space doesn't mean less shade, they will still be in full sun.
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10th September 2009 9:00am
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Marie says...
Does anybody know if there is a dwarf plum available on the market? I live in Western Australia and have planted a number of dwarf trees and would dearly love to be able to find a dwarf plum. Perhaps Craig from plantnet may know?
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10th September 2009 9:06am
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Jantina says...
Hi Marie,my favourite plum Narabeen makes a small (here anyway) spreading tree with large red plums. It's a midseason variety and needs a Santa Rosa, Mariposa or Salad variety to pollinate.I do not know however if you can get them over in W.A.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
10th September 2009 9:36am
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Jimmy says...
No dwarfs, but we can get all those varities here in WA>
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Jimmy
 
11th September 2009 6:08pm
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martin says...
My first year of angel peach has had sudden premature loss of some fruit. What is the possible cause of this? The leaves look healthy and are prolific.
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martin1
gold coast
14th September 2009 6:25pm
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Jimmy says...
this time of year it will be failure to pollinate.
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Jimmy
 
17th September 2009 1:39pm
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martin says...
t;hank you Jimmy for your suggestion. This would be unlikely as there are two bee hives just next to the tree and there were fruit on the tree. Craig advised me that it is likely that the tree cannot sustain the amount of fruit.
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gold coast
26th September 2009 1:01pm
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Wetnwild1 says...
Hi Just wondering if my pinkablle is ok. It lost all it's leaves in July/Aug and has heaps of little buds but none of it has sprouted yet. Is this normal. My Granny smith has done the same but hasn't got very many buds. I gave them some fruit and citrus fert in Sept like the instructions say to for apples. Any ideas.
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wetnwild1
Perth
14th October 2009 4:20pm
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Jimmy says...
Yeah, mine have not sprouted in kelmscott but have in belmont.

Delayed foliation is a sign of lack of chill, that's Perth I'm afraid.
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Jimmy
 
14th October 2009 5:57pm
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Tiggerbow says...
I have 6 apple trees that I planted this winter. None are showing signs of 'sprouting' except for 1 flower on the pinkabelle which is trying very hard to open. I am in Queens park - sort of half way between Kelmscott and Belmont.
I spoke to Joe at Tass 1 trees a couple of weeks ago and he said it was pretty normal at this stage. It is a bit scary as I seem to have alot of expensive 'sticks' in the garden at the moment. Our peach is flowering like crazy and I have seen Figs and Mulberries putting on leaves and fruit like there is no tomorrow.
I guess we will just have to be a bit more paitent with the apples.
Here's hoping !
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Jodie
Perth WA
15th October 2009 2:01pm
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Julie says...
Apples seem to be much later than other fruit. My peaches, plums and apricots have finished flowering, but the Gala apple has only put out a few leaves and flower buds.

Apples are also very late to lose their leaves, long after everything else, so they seem to have a different timetable.
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Roleystone WA
15th October 2009 2:10pm
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Jimmy says...
Think about it this way, apples come froma climate where it snows (lots)

they get going later in the season to beat spring frosts.

They go later in the season as in their native climate they have the leaves frozen off in autumn.
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Jimmy
 
15th October 2009 4:04pm
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amanda says...
Hi Tiggerbow - mine have just sprouted leaves and flowers over last cupla weeks...bit warmer here so yours shouldn't be far behind?
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
15th October 2009 7:03pm
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Chenoa says...
Bought mine from Bunnings in Mandurah about 4 weeks ago as a stick. I thought that it was going to shoot leaves last week but now it seems to be weeping some liquid from the top. It's in a nice sunny position and have kept it watered regularly. Can anyone help?
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Chenoa
Mandurah WA
21st October 2009 1:43am
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Gus says...
I'd say, just give it time. It's only a very young tree that grows slowly.

This year my pinkabelle is currently full of flowers. Last year however it had barely any.

My tree is very thin, so I've supported it alot. Without the support I'm sure my tree would fall over with just two apples.

I also am lucky enough to be minding another 10 pinkabelles in pots donated from plantnet. The pinkabelles will be next year in the La Trobe Bendigo Demonstration/Community garden.

The pinkabelles in the pots are thicker and shorter than mine. But of the ten, only two have some flowers.

So just have faith and give it time.
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Gus1
Bendigo
21st October 2009 9:33am
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Chenoa says...
Thanks for giving me a glimmer of hope. I am just starting to get into gardening so your insight means alot.
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Chenoa
Mandurah WA
23rd October 2009 11:50pm
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wetnwild1 says...
Thanks for putting my mind at rest. Now I just have to wait and keep my fingers crossed. I don't expect much as it is young and was put in a slightly bigger pot about 4 months ago. But a taste of the fruit this year would be nice.
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wetnwild1
Craigie WA
24th October 2009 11:07am
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Brad says...
My non-gardening other half went to a kitchen tea and came home with a gift of a Pinkabelle. Now just got to figure out what to do with it
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Brad2
Perth
24th October 2009 11:26pm
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wetnwild1 says...
Wow.....would not believe this my tree has just decided to wake up! Heaps of tiny leaves and flowers!
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wetnwild1
Craigie WA
6th November 2009 12:36am
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jimbo says...
Same here,wetnwild.I've got 2 Pinkabelles in 75L containers.Got a couple of fruits last year.Also have got a low-chill ANNA( apple of Israel)tree,with loquat sized fruits now.
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Nedlands WA
7th November 2009 7:12pm
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Kreyfish says...
Just wondering how the Brisbane growers are getting on with their Pinkabelles?
Did they set fruit and what are you using as pollinators?
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Ipswich Qld
9th December 2009 10:47pm
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Jimmy says...
My one in Belmont flowered profusely but not one fruit set.

Kelmscott is going great guns as I have granny smith and the crab apple as pollinisers there.
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Jimmy
Perth
10th December 2009 1:47pm
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Kreyfish says...
Thanks Jimmy. Where did you get the Granny Smith and Crab Apple?
I have just bought a Pinkabelle and an Anna for pollination. Craig tells me that I am right on the cusp for chill hours at 450 here in Ipswich so I am crossing my fingers as the Pinkabelle cost me a fortune!
I am really interested in other SE Qlders experiences with this apple.
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Kreyfish
Ipswich Qld
10th December 2009 4:39pm
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Original Post was last edited: 10th December 2009 4:44pm
Jimmy says...
www.plantnet.com.au
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Jimmy
Perth
11th December 2009 6:19pm
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Kreyfish says...
Thanks Jimmy. Any other Pinkabelle growers in Qld?
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Ipswich Qld
11th December 2009 9:40pm
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Kreyfish says...
Anyone?
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Kreyfish
Ipswich Qld
12th December 2009 11:15pm
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zoedog says...
Hi Kreyfish,
I bought my Pinkabelle ~18mths ago. It started out in a large self watering pot. 2 apples set but some caterillar/larve? got to them wilst still small. I have since planted it out on east side of the house so it gets a little shade in the afternoon. It still looks a little stick like with only a few spurs with leaves! Once again 2 apples set and then died. But it is flowering again and there appears to be a few small apples. I think I'll have to get the molasses or neem oil out this time.
I have also just put in an angel peach and dwarf nectarine to go with the pomegranate. Fingers crossed as I have VERY HEAVY clay soil (you could pot with it), and live under the bat colony flight path.
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zoedog
Ipswich Qld
29th December 2009 2:59am
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wisteria_way says...
Can anyone help. I have been given a tropical apple tree and a blood plum in a bag. They are both about 6ft high,tag just says low chill, can I grow these on bribie island. i imagine they grow to about 3-4 meters, any help would be appreciated.
thanks Deb
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wisteriaway1
bribie island
6th January 2010 1:00pm
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Applenut says...
Just stumbled upon your forum, and great questions here; I wanted to clear up some questions about winter chill.

I grow about 100 varieties of apples in Inland Southern California in the USA where we have very hot summers and warm winters, averaging about 200 hours of chill; citrus is the main crop in the area, but we also grow avocados, bananas, and other sub-tropicals. My nursery specializes in growing apple trees in hot climates and the tropics, and we ship to the African tropic lowlands. We have re-imported apple varieties from the Grove Research Station in Tasmania that originated in the USA in the nineteenth century, but are now extict from cultivation here.

Chilling hours for apples will affect it's behavior and timing, but any apple will fruit here. Blossoming will be delayed or extended, but the trees do bear a full load of fruit by the end of the season which extends months past the normal apple season in cold climates. We start out harvesting Anna and Dorsett Golden in June and wrap up with Lady Williams in February, after Anna is already blossoming again. We have grown many apples considered "high chill" such as Northern Spy, Winesap, Honeycrisp, Red Delicious, Arkansas Black, and Gravenstein.

Do not let someone tell you that apples will not grow in your area until you actually try it. We heard that for years here in Southern California until somebody who didn't know better actually planted them, and got a ton of apples. Now the quality may not be as good on some varieties, but we've found plenty that are as good or better than when grown in a cold climate.

Having a pollinator can affect the fruit quality; Anna is tall and skinny unless pollinated with Dorsett Golden, and the seeds will just be little specks. But when pollinated they get nice and fat, as does Dorsett. However, they blossom months before our Pink Lady does and will not pollinate it.

You can see a list of 20 of our favorite apples in a hot climate at http://www.kuffelcreek.com/favorites.htm
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Applenut
California, USA
6th January 2010 11:36pm
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Brad says...
Thanks Applenut - if you didn't notice, there have been a few posts on this site mentioning your website (and book I think???), so welcome and thanks for your post
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Brad2
Como, Perth
7th January 2010 12:26am
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Damo says...
Kevin your totally awesome.
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Damo
 
7th January 2010 10:35am
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Wayne says...
Great posting Applenut, we could well be able to grow apples alongside our Mangoes, how nice would that be. I have never seen an apple tree let alone pick and eat a fresh one nor any of the stone fruits.

We just have to put up with mangoes, bananas, pawpaws, pineapples, monsteras, I guess we don't do so bad.
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Wayne
Mackay QLD
7th January 2010 11:28am
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Original Post was last edited: 7th January 2010 12:58pm
amanda says...
Very inspiring Applenut! Years ago the Agriculture folk here in Geraldton (mid west WA) said you couldn't grow olives here. We now have Eagle Vale olive farm that has won the gold medal 2yrs running now for the best table olive in Australia!
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
7th January 2010 11:57am
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Applenut says...
Wayne:

Absolutely you can grow apples; check out the annual Apple Fiesta in Borneo, Malaysia:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MK0yW7U_ddQ

Dave Wilson Nursery also did a couple of videos on apple growing in a warm climate at my house that you can see at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jwtYhS2Qcs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxL1F0I6ltE

I see the same thing repeated in hot climates and the tropics all over the world.
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Applenut
California, USA
7th January 2010 1:31pm
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Peter the permie says...
Hi Applenut, great to see your post on low chill varities, I noted you got some scion from Grove in Tassie, it has been closed by the Govt on sept 30th 2009 but we are waiting to see what happens with some others who may carry on with its great work. We have lost 3 more Govt research stations this last year.
I am one of the founders of the Heritage Fruits Society here in Victoria and I have a personal collection of fruit trees of over 1000 vars now (about 500 of them apples)I have all of the vars you mentioned here, we have fully duplicated what was at Grove, this last winter we adding 312 more vars of apples & pears that I didn't have already, we also produce many trees for sale to go in backyards here in SE Australia, i was amazed you had Bramleys seedling down as growing well for you, my question would be what rootstock do you use and do you believe it assists in giving you the Low chill characteristics as I have never seen that before.
I would like to catch up with you in 2010 or 2011 when we come to USA to photograph the NY collection and Canada apples but we are diverting to see other interesting sites. you can contact me direct through www.petethepermie.com if you wish.
Regards peter Allen
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Peter the permie
monbulk vic
15th January 2010 10:09am
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Jimmy says...
Pete

He likes M111 per his website.

Tell me about Stattion closeures, I worked at Stoneville until it went bust.

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Jimmy
Perth
15th January 2010 12:13pm
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Applenut says...
Peter:

We've used M27, Bud. 9, P22, EMLA7, EMLA111, MM106, and seedling rootstocks; they've all fruited fine. A warm climate has a dwarfing effect on apples and I've given up on the smaller ones like M27 and Bud. 9, with M7 serving most needs like espalier and close spacing (one meter apart in the tall spindle orchard) and M111 being the standard semi-dwarf selection. Wooly aphid has reared its ugly head, and so EMLA111 is our recommended favorite, as long as its planted deeply because of aerial burr knots. For growers in the tropics I recommend seedling, spaced 2m x 3m if soil fertility and water allow it.

If there is an apple that will not fruit with only 200 chill hours, I have not found it yet. Fruiting is not the problem; quality is. Early fall is blazing hot here, and many varieties ripen in this and either taste like sawdust or a rubber ball; others are impervious to the heat (Bramley) and keep their crunch, juciness, and flavor despite 45C temps. As the season progresses it cools down a bit so early winter-ripening varieties usually do well. Right now I'm waiting for Lady Williams to finally ripen, usually a few days after Dorsett Golden first blooms kicking off the next season.

Most people who tell you that an apple will not fruit in a warm climate have never tried; "experts" just quote each other and it becomes standard thinking without someone actually sticking a tree in the ground to see what happens.

Sorry to hear about Grove; I'll head over to your website.

Applenut

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Applenut
California, USA
18th January 2010 4:32pm
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Diana says...
Hi all,

Has anyone tried an Ein Shemer apple? It is a very early season apple apparently bred in Israel like the Anna, and is available in Australia (
http://www.miapple.com.au/ has them).

What do they taste like?

Thanks,

Diana
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Brisbane
8th February 2010 10:43am
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Jimmy says...
Ein sheimer is a crap variety and deleted by most nurseries for that reason, Anna ripens at the same time and tatses way better.
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Jimmy
Perth
9th February 2010 10:44am
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Diana says...
Thanks very much, Jimmy.

I had my suspicions that was the case.

Diana.
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Brisbane
9th February 2010 10:46am
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Kreyfish says...
Thanks Zoedog. I actually dug out 7 cubic metres of clay and sandstone (by jackhammer, shovel and wheel barrow!) and replaced it with 12 cubic metres of organic mix/soil to form a semi raised bed.

Applenut, I purchased your ebook and found it extremely informative (and quite humorous - you're a funny bugger!). I am implementing your pruning and training methods now and will follow your instructions as closely as possible.
Anyone interested in warm climate apple growing should definitely invest in this book.
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Kreyfish
Ipswich Qld
12th February 2010 8:55pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th February 2010 9:24pm
Applenut says...
Other than being bred by Abba Stein, the same breeder as Anna apple, I don't know why Ein Shemer (named after the Kibbutz where Stein worked) exists. It has been touted as a pollinator for Anna, but blossoms two weeks later. Dorsett Golden is far superior in quality and ripens just before Anna, and they pollinate each other wonderfully resulting in nice fat apples. Ein Shemer goes from nasty sour to tasteless sawdust in 20 minutes. Yet I always see tons of them selling at the nursery and home centers; perhaps because folks are looking for a green, tart apple? One does fine here you folks might be familiar with; Granny Smith :)

I feel like putting signs out saying "Friends don't let friends plant Ein Shemer".

Thanks for the plug Kreyfish!
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Applenut
California, USA
23rd February 2010 12:49pm
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Jimmy says...
I have the book as well, it rocks.
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Jimmy
Perth
23rd February 2010 2:17pm
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Violet_Cactus says...
What book?
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VioletCactus1
Melbourne
23rd February 2010 9:28pm
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Jimmy says...
Kuffel Creek book.
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Jimmy
Perth
24th February 2010 8:06am
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Violet_Cactus says...
Thanks Jimmy,
Bit of a coincidence here, I've just been watching some of Kuffel Creek's videos on You Tube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0e2SuupqCM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zv8XvsmDJfs
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VioletCactus1
Melbourne
24th February 2010 9:51am
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Original Post was last edited: 24th February 2010 9:52am
Brad says...
The young Pinkabelle I got in October is pushing out one flower near the base. I find that odd - it flowered in spring, but as its a baby, didn't fruit. Normal behaviour for Perth climate?
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Brad2
Como, Perth
24th February 2010 4:23pm
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BJ says...
I discovered new blossoms on a few of my apples this morning too! They are not Pinkabelle but I'm wondering it if has something to do with our weird weather ... maybe they think it is spring again. (And mine have fruit that should ripen soon ... so clearly they are mixed up!)
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BJ11
Perth
24th February 2010 4:52pm
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Charles cant spell says...
Brad, my granny smith had 2 fruit on it but they got scorched in the very hot weather earlier. I picked them off a few weeks ago, the plant is now flowering madly again.
So I am guessing that if they have no fruit from the first flowers they will go again a few months later. Pretty clever really.

My pinkabell has 2 apples and is not in flower at the moment.
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
24th February 2010 4:55pm
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Brad says...
aah. if only I'd read Applenut's book ;)
pull off or let it go (I imagine it'll drop on its own accord)?
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Brad2
Como, Perth
24th February 2010 6:53pm
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Charles cant spell says...
well do a test, see if it sets, then pick it off if you want the tree a bit stronger before it starts producing fruit. That was you know in the future if you loose/have to remove your first crop to disease or something you might get a second crop.
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
24th February 2010 7:00pm
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Julie says...
Will a Pinkabelle grow in Tea Gardens NSW? (Sandy soil, on the coast but not close to the beach at Port Stephens)we have mild winters.

Thanks
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Julie17
 
25th February 2010 10:06am
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Jimbo says...
My two pinkabelles growing in tubs were pollinated by a nearby Anna. The resultant pinkabelles apples are not reddish atm,but light green,like Anna.Anyone with similar phenomenon?
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Nedlands WA
28th February 2010 11:20pm
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gezza says...
Planted 2 pinkabelles 6 months ago got flowers which fell off, now end february had more flowers now fruit starting to form wow this is really good!
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gezza
umina beach
8th March 2010 9:39pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th March 2010 9:40pm
Jimmy says...
My pinkabelles are leaning over thanks to all the wild weather in Perth.

Plus the 50-60 fruit on each.

So watch out as the rootstock used has quite brittle roots and they can go over in storms.
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Jimmy
Perth
15th April 2010 12:57pm
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Jenni says...
My daughters bought me two Pinkabelle Trees in November.They are growing in wine barrels and seem happy and healthy. Both have fruit on them but the apples are green like a Granny Smith. How do I know if they are really Pinkabelles?
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Jenni3
Mundaring
15th April 2010 1:20pm
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Jimmy says...
They will not get pink til late may, when the background colour (under the pink) turns to yellow not gree, they are ripe or cut one open, when the seeds are dark brown they are ripe.
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Jimmy
Perth
15th April 2010 4:14pm
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confused says...
I bought my 2 Pinkabelles last winter. They have grown and have a few branches and leaves galore, they have flowered and thats it... no fruit (I would have taken it off anyways) and no losing of leaves. Now some of you are talking about more flowering and fruit and mine are still doing nothing.

Shall I take it as I would a child? "let them go and they'll do when they are ready and meanwhile are building themselves and getting stronger"? Or think something is wrong?

Also, I was looking at putting some ballerina trees in my backyard as a screen, I thought based on what my pinkabelles have done, they should stay kinda leafy, do they not?

Thanks

Total non fruitgrowing gardener
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confused
Perth
22nd April 2010 8:32pm
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Damo says...
if you are on the flats and not the hills they probly will not lose their leaves due to lack of chill.

You can pull them all off around late may to help the tree.

I grow the crab apple ballerina and it looks great with dark pink flowers and reddish leaves year round.
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Damo
 
23rd April 2010 11:52am
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd April 2010 11:54am
BJ says...
Confused,
I think pinkabelles need a pollinator ... if you're getting flowers but no fruit that could be a reason.
My apples dont' drop their leaves either. I'm not very experienced so I let them be and they seemed happy to keep their leaves. They just produced even more in spring!
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BJ11
WA
23rd April 2010 12:29pm
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Charles cant spell says...
One of the natural mechanisms of the plant to control pest and disease is to drop the leaves and remove living area and food for the pest, I am no expert either but I would be removing your leaves a few months before the spring flush.

Just my opinion though.
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
23rd April 2010 2:16pm
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confused says...
thankyou.

I live in Rockingham, so Id have assumed a little chill? never mind, I will pull off late may if they dont do it themselves.

I bought two pinkabelles so they would pollinate themselves, but perhaps it isnt working...I really liked the look of the crab apples, so perhaps if I use it as the screen and manually pollinate them with the pinkabelle next time, things will work better?

Thankyou again.
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confused
Perth
23rd April 2010 10:17pm
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Damo says...
2 pinkablles do not cross pollinate.

Rememeber they are budded from the same parent tree, you need something different.
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Damo
 
23rd April 2010 11:45pm
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Charles cant spell says...
Yup, crab apples are a good idea for the cross polinators as they flower for a long period meaning you can probable have 1 crab apples be the cross polinatior for 3 different varieties of apple.
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Charlesstillcantspell1
Perth Innaloo
24th April 2010 10:43am
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Applenut says...
Don't worry about the trees not losing their leaves; in a few years they will figure out where they're at and start behaving normally, dropping most of their leaves no matter how little chill you have. I've tried leaving the leaves on and stripping them, and it doesn't seem to make a difference when they blossom or the fruit set I get.

One advantage of stripping the leaves by hand is that it gives you a chance to spray with a dormant oil. Also, painting the whole tree white with latex paint thinned 50% with water will help shield the tender bark from the hot Aussie sun.
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Applenut
California, USA
25th April 2010 1:35pm
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Trev says...
I've had a pinkabelle for 2 years now and have full size fruit. They are a light green with pink tinge in sections

How do i know if the fruit are ready to eat?
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Trev
Perth
26th April 2010 9:35pm
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Steve says...
I have a pinkabelle apple with 5 green fruit on it. Does anyone know when they should be ready for picking? My nursery told about ANZAC day.
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Steve17
Port Macquarie NSW
4th May 2010 12:07pm
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Itdepends says...
They should go fairly pink-red but you can always taste test it now. You may not get much colouration if the fruit isn't getting sunlight.

Over here Pink Ladies (full size tree variety of Pinkabelle) have only started ripening in the last few weeks. You should see them ripening over the next 2-4 weeks. I'd be trying one once you start to see a pink blush and see if it tastes ok to you.

(mine have only just started colouring up- taste ok but not juicy enough yet).

Daniel
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4th May 2010 2:28pm
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Shana says...
Does anyone have any information or know where to buy a pinkabelle apple tree in the US? Thanks
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Shana
United States
12th May 2010 6:57am
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Applenut says...
Shana;

Sorry, but they're still undergoing testing and are a few years from distribution. Once they're released you'll probably find them from Dave Wilson Nursery or other wholesale nurseries that sell to retail nurseries (not big box home stores).
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Applenut
California, USA
12th May 2010 12:52pm
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Brad says...
Here's a photo of my Pinkabelle after I pulled off the remaining leaves. (we've got a couple cold nights coming up, so I want to catch the chill hours). Its got some really nice branches on the main trunk and a 2nd large branch coming up that I'm not sure what to do with.

As far as I can tell the tree is healthy - are there any preventative sprays you'd recommend while dormant? I gave it a couple copper sprays in May before leaf fall.

PS the background is a Wurtz avo waiting to go into the ground and the neighbours untended bananas
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Picture: 1
  
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Brad2
Como, Perth
8th June 2010 5:19pm
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liz says...
my name is Liz and i own Parkland Garden centre in Picton WA just outside Bunbury

just wanted to let you all know we sell lots of different apple varieties including pinkabelle and other dwarf apple varieties as well as dozens of other fruit trees our stock is all available as bare rooted at present and is bagged up once they start to bud up most are priced between 29.95 and 39.95 as bare rooted stock species included peach plum nectarines cherry pomegranate nuts persimmons quince mulberry pears figs olives citrus currents loquat jst name a few

you can contact me on 08 97254290 9 to 5 7 days a week

cheers Liz
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liz11
bunbury wa
17th June 2010 7:23pm
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Itdepends says...
Just a comment RE the previous post- Parkland is the best nursery in the Bunbury area if you're after fruit trees- particularly this time of year as they're the only ones with bare root trees. Wandilla/Tass1 trees are good options up in Perth and will have a wider variety- but I generally only make the trip there if I can't get it down here at Bunbury).

Daniel
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20th June 2010 10:54am
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mommaduck says...
I just planted a Pinkabelle with 2 Ballerinas (Bolero & Maypole) as a trio.
I just finished reading this thread (lucky first read from google)and will be checking in regularly.
What are aerial burr knots? I removed a clump of 'things' from the maypole before planting as they looked like a sprout from the rootstock.
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
31st July 2010 7:00pm
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Jimmy says...
Thats an aerial burr knot.
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Jimmy
Perth
1st August 2010 2:20pm
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Charles says...
I've just planted a pinkabelle pink lady and was told to buy a sundowner as pollinator. They both flower at the right time, but are they an OK pair for pollination? I was leaning towards red delicious but the guy talked me into it. It was only until a few days later did I think that sundowner is a bit of a risk being such a close relative. Any thoughts?
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Charles2
Perth
18th August 2010 6:59pm
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Pauline says...
Pinkabelles are semi self fertile anyway.... Mine managed apples with no other apple tree near by. I did however go out with a cotton bud to help polination. :)
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Pauline
Adelaide
18th August 2010 10:11pm
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Liane says...
Woodbridge in Tasmania now sends Apples to WA - quite reasonable as well, picked up 5 @ $26 each, $21 for posting and another $15 for spraying. So $166 for 5 dwarf apple trees.

http://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au

So there are a few more options for tree's.
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Liane
Perth
29th August 2010 11:27am
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Original Post was last edited: 29th August 2010 11:28am
Jimmy says...




At last! Heirloom apples for

WA Diggers members


WA quarantine restrictions have just been lifted on heirloom apples. This is great news for all of our members in the west, who can now plant their own backyard orchard.

Stocks are limited and selling fast so get your order in before plant orders close on Oct 8.
Here are some of our favourites:

SNOW APPLE
This mid-season apple originated in France in the 1600s. Small, sweet and crunchy, the pure white flesh is always popular. Pollinated by Granny Smith or Yates.
APPLE STURMER PIPPIN
Highly valued for it's juicing qualities, Sturmer can also be eaten fresh, used in cooking or for drying. A late variety that stores well for up to three months. Pick from the tree as late as possible for best developed flavour. Pollinators- Granny Smith and Snow Apple.

APPLE OPALESCENT
An American variety that prospered under Australian conditions. Originating in Ohio and introduced to the market in 1899, it is a large and sweet mid-season dessert apple with a shiny red skin on the sunny side. Pollinators- Granny Smith or Rome Beauty
APPLE GRANNY SMITH
Australia's own heirloom apple, being a chance seedling in Mrs Thomas Smith's garden in Ryde NSW in 1860. Bake or bottle, or wait until it turns dull yellow for maximum sweetness. Stores well. Pollinated by Abas or Blue Permain.

APPLE GRAVENSTEIN
Sweet, tasty and delicious, this apple was first described in 1797. Eat them straight off the tree from February to March, or bottle for use in winter and spring. Fruiting Feb-Mar. (NB, Gravenstein is a triploid flower, so it will not provide viable pollen for other varieties). Pollinator- Abas
APPLE ROME BEAUTY
A dual purpose late apple that is well-suited to our long hot summers A chance seedling arising from an orchard in upstate New York in 1816. Rome Beauty has large brillant red skin and sweet flesh. A good cooker and a useful keeper. Self fertile, but pollinators are also Snow, Cox's Orange Pippin, Opalescent or Granny Smith for better fruit set.

browse our our full range
(
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Jimmy
Perth
8th September 2010 2:01pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th September 2010 2:02pm
snottiegobble says...
Hi to folks in Sth west WA. Karen at Capel Frogsong nursery has pinkabelle apple trees for sale at the moment. She is in the township main road ( Forrest st, Donnybrook Rd). She also has the new csiro developed red centred lime trees at $50 each!
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17th September 2010 11:03pm
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Jimmy says...
My pinkabelles have started to flower.
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Jimmy
Perth
11th October 2010 11:18am
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Brad says...
mine too. it came into leaf simultaneously (Charles - did I spell that right? ;) )
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Brad2
leaving Como, Perth this week
11th October 2010 12:13pm
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diligentduck says...
I'm delighted that my Pinkabelle and two Ballerinas seem to be producing fruit. When and how is it best to remove the apples? (I only planted them this year)
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
2nd November 2010 2:25pm
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Jacelyn says...
Hi

My Pinkabelle is doing really well - covered with leaves, blooms and several baby apples already (I'm so excited!).

My question is that there seems to be some new growth coming up at the bottom of the stem near the ground. Should I remove this? I don't really understand much about the whole grafting/root stock discussion so I don't know whether I should leave it or not and if I should remove it, how I should do this. I didn't get a chance to take photos last night but I can upload some later tonight if necessary.

Any help would be much appreciated!
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Jacelyn
Rivervale, WA
10th November 2010 5:16pm
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diligentduck says...
Am interested in the answer myself.
I have a few sprouts poking through the soil now. I suppose I should go and reread this thread. Now I know what to look for I think I can see the knobbly bits from previous sprouts. ( aerial burr knots? couldn't remember my password for mommaduck)
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
10th November 2010 6:34pm
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Original Post was last edited: 10th November 2010 6:36pm
diligentduck says...
Been searching and found this. Doesn't help me now :(

Depth of Planting
The proper depth at which to plant apple trees remains a very important issue. With the exception of high density supported systems (slender spindle, vertical axis, etc.), the bud union should be positioned 5 cm above the final soil level. The length of rootstock shank above the soil surface determines the vigour of the scion. This is a greater factor with dwarf than more vigorous rootstocks. To plant deeper may lead to the scion growing roots and the dwarfing influence of the rootstock being lost. To have the union excessively above the ground will reduce the size of the tree and introduces the possibility of burr-knots or aerial roots developing. This disruption in the bark can be invaded by the dogwood borer and lead to tree losses. For consistency of tree size and to reduce unnecessary trunk injury, special care is required to properly position the bud union.
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/facts/00-007.htm

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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
11th November 2010 2:01pm
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Original Post was last edited: 11th November 2010 2:02pm
Jacelyn says...
Hahahaha I had to google the words bud union, scion, rootstock shank, burr-knot and aerial root!

What can I say... Oops...? hahaha Mine isn't planted 5 cm above the ground lol. I just plonked it in my bigger pot at the same level as what it was from the nursery pot.

So.. does that mean I should remove those little growths? Do I just cut them off, or pull them, or?
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Jacelyn
Rivervale, WA
11th November 2010 5:00pm
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diligentduck says...
Jacelyn,
I started another thread and got a reply here.

https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/aerial-burr-knots/
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
11th November 2010 9:34pm
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Jacelyn says...
Thanks heaps for that, diligentduck! Just to be sure, did yours look like this?
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Jacelyn
Rivervale, WA
12th November 2010 9:12pm
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diligentduck says...
Almost, mine wasn't that big yet.
I just ripped it off.
Will have to think about digging back the dirt to get a knife to it :(
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
12th November 2010 10:01pm
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Original Post was last edited: 12th November 2010 10:01pm
Jacelyn says...
Oh good I'll do the same to mine tomorrow. I went on holidays and suddenly it was like that when I got back! At least I can't accuse my housemate of not watering my plants =P
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Jacelyn
Rivervale, WA
12th November 2010 11:17pm
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kerri says...
Hi I'm so excited I have apples on my Pinkabelle, it has only taken 2 years I was just about to give up. I'm excited, Now what do I do? It is in a pot out the front? What do i feed it? Spray on it to heep of the bugs? What else do I need to know. Also my other fruit trees I have, lemon, manderine and dwarf peach which has heaps of fruit I've never seen so much on them since I've had them. I took off about 2/3rds on the peach. :-)
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kerri
secret harbour
15th November 2010 11:26pm
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Gus says...
I'd suggest removing all the apples now. Your tree is only young, it's best you remove the fruit so the tree still concenttrates it's engery into building the root system.

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Gus1
Bendigo
27th November 2010 8:43am
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Brad says...
I've left 4 apples on my tree after thinning. its decided to flower again. it flowered twice last year (its first, so i didn't let it fruit) too. i take it this is a sign of a happy pinkabelle
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Brad2
G hill,Perth
4th December 2010 2:12am
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wazzamcg says...
I own a pinkabelle, a sundowner and a fuji - the last two are on dwarfing rootstock M26. The good news is that I have 4 fruit set on my pinkabelle - I live on the southside of Brisbane (Eight Mile Plains) and there was some doubt whether pinkabelle would fruit in our climate. I have been reading this thread for sometime and thought I would give it a go.

For the record, the sundowner flowered first (mid sept), then pinkabelle (mid oct) - I am yet to see the fuji flower even though it is healthy.

I bought the pinkabelle from Birchgrove nursery Mt.Tamborine and it was about 6 feet tall - that would have been 15 months ago, I planted it out early/mid winter this year as I wanted it settled into the ground before spring (pictures 2,3,4).

The other two apple trees were bought from Woodbridge Fruit Trees in Tasmania, I had to order in advance (February) and they arrived by post in great condition (mid Winter), though they were leafless and branchless and about 3ft high - now they are 7ft. One week after getting them I planted them out either side to the pinkabelle. Woodbridge Fruit Trees were very helpful in the selection I made. (Sundowner are pictures 5&6) and (Fuji is picture 7).

Within a few weeks of planting out the trees we were getting leaves and flowers.

Each apple tree recieved a couple of good spadefuls of diatomaceous earth, homemade compost and a mix of a quality potting mix and the red sandy loam the soil came from to make the hole.

The pictures taken are about 4~5 months after the trees were planted. Every month or so I sprayed the plants, via the packet directions, a mixture of eco-oil and mancozeb plus. I never fertilised intially, however, after a couple of months they started getting their share of the worm wee generated out of the wormfarm.

I will probably put up an 8ft espalier over the next few months and order a couple more apple tree's in February from Woodbridge Farm - I'm thinking a pink lady and a lady williams. The family only eat reddish apples.

Just behind the apple trees I have garlic and onion chives growing and about 10 feet away I have a good assortment of herbs growing in polystyrene brocolli boxes. Most are the edible type and a few for beneficial insects (picture 1).

I am looking forward to next spring as these young trees will be even more established.

I would really appreciate any advice that may seem obvious from my comments and pictures. Thanks.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6

Picture: 7
  
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wazzamcg
Brisbane
4th December 2010 12:59pm
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diligentduck says...
What is the purpose of the clothes pegs?
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diligentduck
Sutherland Shire
4th December 2010 5:30pm
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wazzamcg says...
I saw a picture once, I think Bob Mangus (apple guru) was in it, anyway, the logic was to get the young branch growing horizontal to promote fruiting rather than leaves and height.

Those young branches are delicate and it seemed a good idea to get them started horizontal at the critical point to the trunk - wish I had thought of it.

If you google on espalier for apple trees I believe you will get a better answer on why you want the branches horizontal or maybe someone from here could.
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wazzamcg
Brisbane
4th December 2010 6:26pm
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Julie says...
I'd completely forgotten about the horizontal branch thing! I think when I heard it I wasn't growing fruit trees, so the info got tucked away. Information retrieval is getting harder these days!

I'm curious - why the diatomaceous earth in the hole? I only know it as a pesticide, so I can't imagine what it would do in the soil.
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Julie
Roleystone WA
4th December 2010 6:51pm
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amanda says...
Hi Brad - my fuji and pink lady have set fruit and then decided to flower again also. Is that a normal flowering pattern or a weather related thing?
I like your garden wazza - looks low maintenance and healthy. The peg idea brilliant!
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
4th December 2010 7:51pm
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Brad says...
Dunno Amanda. I was kinda asking. Kuffel creek (applenut) says some varieties can crop twice. I certainly won't let mine do that at this stage.

Wazza thanks for your post. Im sure lots of people are curious about apples in brissie. look around on this site, maybe even this thread and you'll see advice (from jimmy?) on thinning apple clusters. Next time don't leave 4 apples in one group. It produces small apples and leaves hiding places for pests. Another thing - don't rush to give up on the Fuji -applenut's book says they can take a little longer to start to flower
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Brad2
G hill,Perth
4th December 2010 8:17pm
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wazzamcg says...
The main reason why I put diatomaceous earth into the surrounding soil prior to planting was because;

1. It has a high content of silica and that helps (apparently) to release/unlock phosphorus within the soil that helps health and growth. That has to be a good thing.

2. Water-retention capacity of the soil - I'm fairly sure a kitty litter called Kleensorb would do the same thing. It's diatomaceous earth as well, but lighter and white in colour.

3. I recognised the small sharp pebbles in the potting mix (ochre & brownish) when I bought the pinkabelle and thought the if the guru's did it so why shouldn't I.

Apparently you must be careful not to inhale any of dust when handing it - not that I saw any, I wet it down anyway to be on the safe side. It is suppose to be a slow release form of silica.

The diatomaceous earth I thought I had recognised when I purchased my pinkabelle was very similar to a product called Maidenwell All Purpose Silica.

I'm fairly sure it's the silica that the bonsia people chase. I think the Kleensorb would do a similar job and probably cheaper. I re-call seeing a bonsai apple tree with one full grown apple on it.

Brad - thanks for the heads up the 4 head cluster, if it doesn't work this year I will learn for next year ;-)

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wazzamcg
Brisbane
4th December 2010 9:12pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st December 2010 7:52am
Julie says...
Wazza,the diatomaceous earth I am familiar with is a whitish/grey powder, not lumps. So I don't know about the stuff you have used.

Where did you buy it?
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Julie
Roleystone WA
5th December 2010 8:58pm
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wazzamcg says...
I have found their web site;

http://maidenwelldiatomiteaustraliaptyltd.vpweb.com.au/

I bought it at a large nursery - not a Bunnings as such. Having said that, if you ring around or order it, some may have it. Cross your fingers and hope there might be a mine handy that is close to you.

If not, check the information on kitty litters at those jumbo pet centres - look for words like soil conditioner and then do a google on the product to see what it is.

I imagine WA can dry plants out fast like Brisbane so it would do two main things for you - supply silica and the ability to hold moisture.

The Kleensorb (kitty litter) I was talking about which seem to be a very similar product though a different colour - their website can be found here;

http://www.mtsylviadiatomite.com.au/diatomite-products/kleensorb/


If you asked me how much I would put in? and I'm no horticulturalist - I would say 5%. I used probably 3 litres in volume to a good wheel barrow.

Furthermore, if you are looking for a slow release potassium boost, have a research on granite crusher dust at 5% also (cheap for long term benefits) ;-) - it will not help on water retention though.

Some time ago, I had read books from authors Ester Dean's - "Growing without Digging" and Alec Bulford's - "Caring for Soil" and basically, I have been hooked on my own soil since. Especially for a potassium fix, ion exchange ability, water holding capacity and organic NPK fertilisers. Hope this helps.
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wazzamcg
Southside Brisbane QLD
6th December 2010 9:37pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st December 2010 7:54am
Charlie says...
can I possibly help a dwarf pink lady, i.e Pinkabelle with a cherry tree next to it (self pollinating) or does it have to be another apple?
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Charlie6
Hobart
17th February 2011 4:04pm
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Jantina says...
Charlie you need another apple to pollinate it, but if you live in town there may well be a pollinator growing in a yard nearby that would do the job. If it gets to say, 4 years and there are no signs of apples you had better plant a pollinator yourself.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
18th February 2011 10:30am
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Applenut says...
Wazza;

Fuji is notorious for taking about 5 years to start to fruit; you may get onsie-twosies a few years, but bears heavily and reliably after that. Some people get discouraged and pull it out right before it really starts to let loose. You will have no problems getting apples to fruit in your climate.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Applenut
California, USA
7th March 2011 3:53am
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Brad says...
My pinkabelle is teasing me. The apples are looking big and reddening up but stay on the tree when pulled at. Anyone in Perth already ripe?

Also anyone in Perth growing opalescent apples?
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Brad2
G Hill,Perth
7th May 2011 11:56am
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Mikey Mike says...
Brad I'm in Duncraig I ate my first pinkabelle about 4 weeks ago and my last one 1 week ago. My Grannies were ready 3 weeks before the pinkabells. My apple trees still haven't gone dormant but my grape,peach and nectarines have, plum leaves are just starting to change colour.
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14th June 2011 9:47pm
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Wetnwild1 says...
Hey, i've picked two very small apples from my pinkabelle so far this year. They were very yummy and just noticed I have another one and 3 more flowers! Lost my granny smith in summers heat wave and have since bought a dwarf one so hopefully I'll get something off that next year.
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wetnwild1
Perth
26th June 2011 11:09pm
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Jimmy says...
I'm still picking mine, they store better on the tree than the fridge.

Lady Williams still too green in Belmont.
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27th June 2011 10:27am
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Daniel says...
Just got myself a dwarf Granny to go with my little Pinkabelle. Apparently it's one of the better pollinators?
Both planted in half wine barrels.
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Daniel8
Beldon, Perth
9th August 2011 5:45pm
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Fayley says...
Quarantine on apple trees to WA has relaxed, some eastern states orchards are sending to WA now. I just had 2 heritage apples grafted onto dwarf rootstock send to me bare rooted from YALCA FRUIT TREES. They charged me $30 for quarantine fees.
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Fayley
Perth
11th August 2011 7:04pm
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mel says...
yes have had one for several years taste same as normal pink lady will fruit on it's own but for good crops does well with a pollinator fuji,Gsmith or delicious. I have a fuji and crops just as well as large tree. Fruit chills well
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mel6
nannup wa
5th September 2011 3:19am
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mel says...
Have you trieds Wandilla nursery in Perth I'm from nannup and I must say this nursery has the best variety of hard to source and unnusual fruit in WA You can get dwarf apples ther as have just bought some 3-4 weeks ago good luck they don't however have a website so you must phone them
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mel6
nannup wa
5th September 2011 3:24am
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AS says...
Where did you get your kei apples from?
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AS
 
15th November 2011 11:07am
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Jacelyn says...
Just wondering if someone could give me some advice - some of the leaves on my pinkabelle have started turning yellow. They fall off when you touch them. I didn't know if it was a disease or something but I have been removing 3 or 4 of these leaves every day for the past couple of days. The tree has approx 20 apples so I don't want to remove too many leaves or cause it stress!

Anybody have any idea what could be causing this? I water it at least every other morning, and every morning when temperatures are high (the tree is on a windy balcony and though well mulched, I worry the hot coastal winds would dry it out quickly).

I don't know if any of this background will make any difference, but I repotted it (it had been over 2 years) last winter, moved house about a week ago, watered it with seasol Saturday morning (but I have been applying seasol regularly for as long as I have had the tree) and my dwarf granny smith/red fuji had similar yellow leaves, and (tho this may not be related) my miniature rose and hibiscus also has some yellow leaves (though the hibiscus only had one).

Could it be a nutrient deficiency thing, or some kind of disease? The leaves turn yellow from the base but the edges are bordered a dark green then brown (presumably from windburn) and the leaves fall off the tree very easily.

Any help is much appreciated.
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Jacelyn
Scarborough WA
5th December 2011 12:47pm
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Julie says...
Hi, Do you stock cox's orange pippin apple and gravenstein apple. We would also like an avacado and a cherry tree. Could you give me the cost to post bare rooted stock to Kambalda WA 6442 please. Kindest regards Julie
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Julie24
KAMBALDA
26th February 2012 7:40pm
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Jimmy says...
Dude those apples will never grow in Kamlbada, and you need to contact Daleys direct not the forum for answers. try www.tass1trees.com.au if you are really desperate he has them cheep.
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27th February 2012 12:47pm
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asder says...
You have been misinformed ,Jimmy. Looking at the winter temps in K. it is evident that there is more than adequate chill for Pinkabelle apples .
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asder3
sydney
20th July 2012 11:29am
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Boris Spasky says...
More than adequate chill perhaps but they will turn to mush in the oppressive summer heat.
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Boris Spasky
 
20th July 2012 11:01pm
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asder says...
No, if you check you'll find that apples are OK with heat. It is possible (I do) to grow apples with as much heat as interior WA . If heat is the problem you allow more leaf to remain after pruning to afford shade for the fruit.
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asder4
sydney
23rd July 2012 8:22am
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Pauline says...
My apples tend to cook on one side when we have heatwaves here in SA. I leave them on the plant and cut that bit off (which ends up looking just like a brooze (sp?) and all is good. Doesn't look too attractive with a tree full of burnt apples though.
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Pauline
Adelaide
29th September 2012 7:19pm
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Granger says...
I am surprised that no one has mentioned how they control fruit fly on Pinkerbelle dwarf apples.Does this mean that these trees are not prone to this destructive pest?
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Granger
Parramatta
18th October 2013 3:06pm
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Boris Spasky says...
Don't kid yourself Granger, ff will have no problems turning your pink lady to crap.
They prefer your neighbours tomatoes or stone fruit though.
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Boris Spasky
 
18th October 2013 10:51pm
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joekoel says...
no such variety as Pink Lady or Pinkabelle


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joekoel
tuerong
4th February 2015 10:50pm
#UserID: 11228
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joekoel says...
no such variety as Cameo
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joekoel
tuerong
4th February 2015 10:51pm
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