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Growing avocado in Melbourne

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Jon starts with ...
I am looking two grow two avocado trees in eastern Melbourne. I am thinking of getting a Gwen and a Bacon avocado tree. This is because the Gwen is a dwarf species and is supposed to give excellent quality fruits. The Bacon is supposed to be very frost tolerant. They are opposite types so I'm hoping they will pollinate each other.

I do have some questions though.

1. Has anyone else tried planting Gwen or Bacon in Melbourne?
2. Of what quality is Bacon's fruit? Edible?
3. Will I be able to keep Bacon to a height of about 4 metres, if well pruned?
4. Where can I get a Gwen tree?

As you can see in the picture I have limited space, but I will be moving the plant on the left hand side, and possibly the compost bin. The fence is north facing.

Thanks,

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
29th December 2008 9:18am
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John says...
you would be better off with a wurtz and rincon both dwarf ands cold lovers.
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John20
Perth
29th December 2008 9:49am
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Jon says...
Thanks, I'll look them up.

Of what quality are the fruit?

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
29th December 2008 10:21am
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Jon says...
This is kind of what I'm hoping for :)
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Jon
Melbourne
29th December 2008 9:05pm
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John says...
PS have seen the wurtz at bunnings in Perth.
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John20
Perth
30th December 2008 10:01am
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RolFlor a says...
Only 1 metre apart?
Try >3 metres apart,?
And closer to the boundary, so as to allow the roots to ' trespass' the neighbour's shallow rooted grasslands more.
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie ' HeightsSydney
30th December 2008 10:22am
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Jon says...
Thanks. Well, I've transplanted the other plant and it looks much more spacious now. I have one hole quite close to their fence and another close to the border of my garden bed. Hopefully this will give them a bit more room. I've also moved the one on the left more to the left.

Any more advice on species?
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Jon
Melbourne
30th December 2008 9:55pm
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Jason says...
Gwen and Rincon are both small trees (Rincon almost hedge like) also Wurtz but Wurtz is rubbish fruit, Rincon isn't that flash either. The fruit on Gwen is very much like Hass (closely related). Bacon is a very tall tree. I'd suggest to get a Hass and Fuerte for your A+B trees in Melboune and forget the rest. Fuerte will get tallish and take along time to set and decent amount of fruit but in the end it's much better than Bacon in both quality and quantity and you will mostly (for the first 5 years) just be using it for pollinating the Hass
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Jason
Portland
31st December 2008 12:21am
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RolFlor a says...
NEW PLANTING POSITIONS : Can you post a picture of the new locations of the 2 Avocados( with the same 2 fake superimposed trees)?
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie Sydney ' .
31st December 2008 7:37am
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Jon says...
I dug some holes too.
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Jon
Melbourne
31st December 2008 10:58am
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Jason says...
Here I made you amore realistic picture of a baby Hass tree (left) and a Bacon or other typical upright Avocado (right)
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Jason
Portland
31st December 2008 6:03pm
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RolFlor a says...
WIDER : Can the trees be planted further apart?
Avocados are more important than the shed ,compost bin and Camelia?
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie' Sydney.
31st December 2008 6:54pm
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Jon says...
Okay, well there is NO way i can move the shed. I might move the compost bin later on when they grow, as that can just be carried away. I'm also considering transplanting a camellia, however that could turn bad..

Thanks for the more realistic photo Jason. Is that "baby hass" like a Gwen or a Holiday? Can they be 'contained' with pruning?

And lastly, are there any type B dwarf species that have good fruit?

Thanks,

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
1st January 2009 10:53pm
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Jon says...
Also Jason, you said get a Hass but there's no way it would fit. What about a Gwen (you said similar fruit?) and a Fuerte. Could I control the Fuerte ie keep it at 5 metres?
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Jon
Melbourne
1st January 2009 10:55pm
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RolFlor a says...
Is the nature strip ready for an avocado?
You might also have some other areas that could take an avocado.
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health101orgarticles1
' Westie' Sydney.
1st January 2009 11:56pm
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Jon says...
Our nature strip already has a large gum tree. And people would steal the avocados.

People grow dwarf avocados in pots. Doesn't that mean there should be enough room if I prune them? Or not...?

Also, are there any type B dwarf avocado trees?

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
2nd January 2009 8:36am
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Jon says...
Could I plant two trees in one hole?

Link: http://www.davewilson.com/homegrown/all_ed/ed_plantTrees.html#multiplanting

I've decided to move the camellia plants to the right about 1 metre which adds a metre more room for the avocados.

Still looking for a dwarf fuerte or something... Any dwarf type b's?

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
3rd January 2009 9:38am
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Jon says...
Here is the latest projection of how they'll look, although I know they're bigger and bushier. It looks like there is a tree hanging over the top of them however it actually ends around 3 metres before the garden bed and can be pruned. The white patch is where the camellia is but won't be for much longer. As you can see in the picture, it's been moved.

Any comments or advice? Still looking for a dwarf type b avocado tree.
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Jon
Melbourne
3rd January 2009 10:00am
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Jon says...
Well, I've think I'll be getting one Gwen tree and one Sir Prize.

Anybody know how big a Sir Prize gets?

Thanks,

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
3rd January 2009 9:30pm
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Jack Fruit &amp; Jilly Pilly says...
Will they fall 'in love'and have lots of bABies?
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health101orgarticles1
IRAQ
3rd January 2009 9:36pm
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Jon says...
Yep :)

The Gwen is type A and the Sir Prize is type B. Various websites have also said their blooming period falls at the same time.

It's not to late to change my mind though.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
3rd January 2009 10:02pm
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Jon says...
Just curious about the height of the Sir Prize tree. I can't seem to get any photos of fully grown Gwen or Sir Prize trees so it's hard to tell. Anyone grown theses trees because I'd LOVE to hear from you.


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Jon
Melbourne
4th January 2009 8:59pm
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Alexa says...
Hate to butt in, but I'm pretty sure you don't NEED two trees to get fruit in Melbourne. According to Glowinski's Complete Guide to Fruit Growing in Australia, the cooler weather allows self-fertilization. Sure you'd get higher yields with an A and B, but it really doesn't look like you have the room for both. It would be tragic if you planted two and in 10 years had to rip one out from lack of space.

But I have not grown an avo in Melbourne so I can't say from first-hand experience. I'm planning on growing one soon though!

That's also the first I've heard of Wurtz tasting bad...I had my eye on the wurtz, anyone else grown them?
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Alexa
Melbourne
20th January 2009 2:55pm
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Jon says...
No, the more people that butt in the better!

I'll definitely be looking into that then as if one really larger tree could self pollinate it would be so much better.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
22nd January 2009 12:33pm
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Hayden says...
Im not sure about the Gwen, but bacon will grow in Melbourne no problems. My friend lives in Hoppers Crossing and has a big Hass avocado in his backyard (approx 3-4 metres high), producing plenty of fruit with no other tree nearby, as Bacon is more cold hardy than hass, i would stick with bacon. But Hass is a definate option.
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haydogster
 
22nd January 2009 1:53pm
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Jon says...
Has anyone tasted Bacon?

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
23rd January 2009 7:57am
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Alexa says...
Not I but I've also been told Bacon is the best for Melbourne because it tolerates cold the best. But I've also been told that someone has a wurtz in Melbourne and gets fruit from it.

It probably depends on if your area gets a lot of frosts and if your spot would be sheltered from frosts.
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Alexa
Melbourne
23rd January 2009 9:28am
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Alexa says...
I just noticed someone else discussing avocados in Melbourne on this thread.

https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/a-and-b-type-avocadoes/

They're getting fruit from Hass and Fuerte in Melb so it looks like you don't HAVE to grow Bacon. But those two are big trees!
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Alexa
Melbourne
23rd January 2009 9:31am
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Alexa says...
Actually there are a LOT of questions about avocados on this forum! I searched the forum for "wurtz" and got a bunch of threads including this one about growing them in Melbourne.

https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/forum/avocados-in-melbourne/

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Alexa
Melbourne
23rd January 2009 9:34am
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Jon says...
Thanks for that last thread Alexa. Good information there. I know Hass grows in Melbourne and Gwen is a a 'Hass child' or something and smaller than full size so I will be sticking with that for type A.

Type B will most likely be either a Sir Prize or a Sharwil but I'm still looking into that.

I think most trees should withstand the frosts with a bit of TLC. They will be in a fairly sheltered area.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
23rd January 2009 2:33pm
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Jason says...
Jon, Bacon "tastes" great if you like how avocados taste if you don't Hass will be better for you. Gwen is a much smaller tree than Hass, heavy fruiting and pretty much the same in everyway except small. But in a cool climate its ALLWAYS better to plant the most vigorous variety you can and cut it back if you have to when you have to. You can cut avocados part of the tree each year, that way you allways have fruiting wood on most of the tree.

No type B's that I know of will fruit as heavily as the worst Type A in a cool climate. But Fuerte is the best Type B I have in both taste and production and a good pollinator, it's often slow to come into production compared to most varieties. My advice is to plant a Hass and Fuerte and be happy :) neither of them will fail you
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Jason
Portland
25th January 2009 11:25pm
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Jon says...
I'm sure I'd be okay with Bacon but I don't think the rest of my family would like it. Problem is, someone just down the street from me has a fuerte and it is HUGE. It's about 8 metres tall and 8 metres across.. There's no way I could fit it.

I've heard of a variety called Millicent which harvests at the same time as Hass and Gwen and is smaller than an average tree. I've scoured the internet but can't find anywhere that stocks it. Does anyone know a nursery or something?
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Jon
Melbourne
28th January 2009 1:21pm
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Jason says...
Yeah but that 8 meters x 8 meter Fuerte tree could easily be 20 years old. I don't think the original parent Fuerte was even that size when found in Atlixco and it was a fairly old tree then. The first worry is getting them to grow and fruit. You can allways cut them back if you have to later on. I have a 8 year old fuerte tree in a dry location that's only 2 meters x 2 meters currently carrying around 100 fruit and a 5 year old 2 x 3 Hass with perhaps 200 fruit on it, they don't grow much at all once they start fruiting heavily unless you pile on the fertiliser and I barely ever fertilise any of my trees jsut because it costs way too much compared to planting more trees
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Jason
Portland
31st January 2009 3:02pm
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Jon says...
Really? How often do you prune them? I'll have to look into getting a full size fuerte or something.
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Jon
Melbourne
31st January 2009 9:31pm
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steve says...
sunraysia nurseries
Ph-03 50248502
email-sales@sunnraysianurseries.com.au
www.sunnraysianurseries.com.au

I recommend these guys. They have a great range of citrus & avocados & will post to you. They have bacon, fuerte, hass, reed, rincon, ryan, sharwill, wurtz, edranol, gwen, hazzard, lamb hass, jalna, millicent & Zutano. Plus they have all the info on them. Call them & ask them to post you their catalogue.
Cheers..
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Jerilderie
31st January 2009 9:35pm
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Jon says...
i have been looking at their catalouge however when I emailed them they said they don't sell direct to public, so I tried their Garden centre. They had Gwen but no Millicent which I was thinking of getting. I will probably get my Gwen tree from them and another from there or someone else. Do you know a way to get a Millicent tree from them?

Thanks

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
1st February 2009 5:11pm
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steve says...
No, I just phoned them & they had what i wanted. Did you ask if they were getting it back in stock or could source one for you?? I found them very helpful by phone.

Cheers..
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Jerilderie
3rd February 2009 8:31pm
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Jon says...
Did you ring the nursery or the garden centre? I'll try by phone and see what happens.. Thanks for the info.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
4th February 2009 6:18am
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Jon says...
Well I rang Sunraysia Garden Centre today and order two avocado trees; a Gwen and a Sharwil. Unfortunately Daleys is still looking for Sharwil propagation materials. I was told they should arrive around next Wednesday and am looking forward to it after such a long wait. I'll keep everyone updated on how they go as I know a fair few people on this forum want to grow avocados in Melbourne.

Thanks everyone for the help.

Jon
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Jon
Melbourne
4th February 2009 7:48pm
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toolman says...
avocado trees are a great addition to your yard but hmmm, i was looking at the grass in the foreground of the proposed gwen, it seems to be struggling, what has happened there, are you going to increase the sunlight(trim overhead branches) or was it suffering lack of water, or soil condition?.
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copashark1
central coast
27th February 2009 5:06am
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Jon says...
It's because it's in the shade I think, however it's all completely dead due to the recent extreme heat. I'm planning on getting a few new fruit trees then I will try fixing the patchy lawn.
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Jon
Melbourne
28th February 2009 10:24am
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Garry says...
Hi just thought I would add I'm growing a Bacon, Hass and Wurtz in south Vic and they are all coping very well. Just needed some protection from frost/extreme sun so used temporary shelters with white shadecloth igloo's. They are thriving and i expect fruit prob next year. Some were burnt back in extreme heat over summer however I've recently pruned that back and new growth is sprouting out all over the place..!! Good luck with yours.
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Garry2
Don Valley
21st April 2009 7:17pm
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Jon says...
Thanks, that's good encouragement :)

All of the leaves off my Gwen tree have been eaten off while I was away for a few days. Anybody know what would have eaten it? The trunk is only about 2 centimetres thick; would a possum be able to climb it?

Thanks,

Jon


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Jon
Melbourne
26th April 2009 2:42pm
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Jantina says...
A little ringtail could.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
26th April 2009 3:16pm
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culebra says...
Is it just me or do many seedling avocado trees have seemingly perpetually yellow leaves regardless of the conditions & ferts? and relatively inferior fruit with a tendency to be tiny and/or abort. all the ones i grew in wa and vic from seed have been like this.
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culebra
Melbourne
7th August 2009 5:29pm
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Andy says...
Hi, we have just purchased a potted avocado tree locally, Think it could be a bacon avocado variety. Any tips on maintaining it, I have already repotted it into a large terracotta pot with premium mix. It stands about 2 metres tall. The leaves were browning & it was rootbound in its old pot.
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Andy8
Bowral NSW
10th August 2009 5:36pm
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Robyn says...
I have a Bacon and a Hass to plant - currently about 2ft tall. I live in a particularly windy location on a hill and wondered if anyone else has had much success growing avocado trees in very windy areas. The only sheltered areas I have are in too much shade.
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Robyn6
Thorpdale Vic
22nd August 2009 4:42pm
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Martin says...
I can't answer for the wind thing but am interested as to what people think is the ideal soil type/Ph and as to weather any one has had any success with espailering avacadoes and what types best lend themselves to this method
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Martin4
Sydney
31st August 2009 10:34pm
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amanda says...
Hi Robyn - both my Hass avo's died and I live in a very windy climate on a hill too - but this was due to salinity more than anything. You need to have very, very good soil and very good drainage. You also need a supply of good quality water. You can always build a windbreak from shadecloth etc until they are bigger - and get some fast growing windbreak trees up n running in the meantime.

After trying many trees - I have started using cottonwoods (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and Kaffir plums - for example..they are outstanding in growth rate, toughness, drought tolerance, wind etc.
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
2nd September 2009 11:38am
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Dany says...
I am looking for as much info as possible re Bacon avo trees as I am about to plant one in Canberra. Can anyone please help?
Dany
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Dany
Canberra
27th December 2009 1:11pm
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Indigoclover says...
I'm also after info on the Bacon variety as I was just given one. Are you able to prune them back to keep them to a more reasonable size?
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28th December 2009 3:46pm
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J says...
Very interested in this thread, as have been trying to find out as much information as possible before planting some avocados.

Unlike a lot of others in this thread, I am not restricted by growth/size, but I do have a few questions as to what would suit my location/area best.

Ideally I'd like to plant a Hass and whatever other type A's and type B's to help give good, quick & solid fruits on a slightly southerly facing slope, with very good drainage, around 25 to 35 metres from a very large dam water level.

Apart from a Hass, what else can I do and plant to help with healthy trees, producing good fruit quickly??

Thanks
J
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J2
Lakes Entrance, Eastern Victoria
2nd January 2010 12:04pm
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Roch says...
J, Never heard of a way to get fruits quickly. Grafted trees take usually 3-4 years to fruit. I'm not sure if Hass is good for Vic due to frost.
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Roch1
Lynbrook, VIC
5th January 2010 12:24pm
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Robyn says...
I planted my hass and Bacon in August 2009 in a semi-protected area of my orchard. They are subject to some wind, which I was concerned about, but both are doing very well. So far so good. I believe that you can prune back to keep the plant the size that you want, Indigoclover.
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Robyn6
Thorpdale Vic
14th January 2010 9:22pm
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tommy says...
i just purchased a HASS and a FUERTE avocado tree from Daley's and I was wondering how far they need to be planted apart for the cross pollination?
Can you plant them too far apart?? i'm on an acre block.
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tommy
Geelong
31st January 2010 8:56am
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Brendan says...
Hi tommy,
As bees can travel up to 10klms, I think you'll be safe on an acre block.
If they were mine, I'd plant them 6 to 8m apart.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
1st February 2010 9:24am
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Matt says...
Hi.
This is one of my Haas that are growing in Melbourne, Prahran. It was grown from seed and is about 3 years old. I have never noticed frost taking a toll but it has been savaged by possums twice. The leaves are supposed to have negative effects on wildlife that eat them and since it has not been attacked for 12 months, I am hoping that they have learned.

They are in well drained soil and love a feed of fish emulsion whenever i get round to them. I think it would have been well worth the investment to plant a grafted tree and therfore get fruit 5 years earlier than growing from seed but I wasn't sure how well it would do down here and so really I just took a punt and if my Haas grew then it was a bonus and I lost nothing trying.

Cheers. Matt.
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Matt8
Prahran, VIC
15th February 2010 3:14pm
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Matt says...
(Continued from above Post).

Matts Haas growing in Prahran, Melbourne.
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Matt8
Prahran, VIC
15th February 2010 3:22pm
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Matt says...
Hi.

Sorry one more thing that I would add is the fact that my Haas is very susceptible to having new shoots burning on hot days. Anything at or above 35, and its self pruning. I think that growing them in a semi shaded area would not be a bad idea.

Hope my 2 cents worth helps someone cause i suspect its going to be too late for Jon :-)

Matt
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Matt8
Prahran, VIC
15th February 2010 3:40pm
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amanda says...
Hi Matt - why don't you try "Drought Sheild" or "Parasol" in the summer? They are very good for sunburn. It seems your tree has a lot of reflected light to deal with maybe? Once it gets bigger and leafier it sould be mostly ok. Your tree looks great BTW :-)
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amanda19
Geraldton. WA
15th February 2010 9:20pm
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Martin says...
Hi John where did you get the Gwen? i Searched for these with a nil result
cheers M
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Martin4
Sydney
16th February 2010 7:32pm
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Matt says...
Thanks for the advice Amanda. I'm glad you like my tree, cause for some reason I'm really attached to it and I love my tree. It really makes me happy watching it recover from any trauma and generally grow larger. As corny as it sounds it brings me real joy this tree.

Thanks again. Matt.
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Matt8
Prahran, VIC
23rd February 2010 10:13pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Matt,
I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you won't get a Hass avocado tree from a Hass avocado seed.

Not only will it take 8 to 10 years to bear, if it ever does (some don't), you will get an unknown tree with an unknown fruit.
You could be lucky and get good fruit, but usually, you get a strange looking fruit with a large seed. Also, seedling avo trees grow huge, whereas grafted trees don't grow that tall.

If you can, buy a grafted avo tree. Some take only 2 years to bear.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
24th February 2010 9:08am
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Original Post was last edited: 24th February 2010 9:15am
Grubs says...
Oh :( I've been nursing along seedlings from Hass seeds that grew in my compost. Can you explain *why* a Hass seed doesnt grow into a Hass avocado?
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68
Melbourne
24th February 2010 10:12am
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Brendan says...
Hi Grubs,
Good question. I don't know, but I'd say it's because they're grafted? (Someone on this forum will know.)

I've grown at least 8 Hass avocado trees from Hass seeds, and none of these produced a Hass fruit. Most of these trees are now over 20 years old. So I've sort of learnt from experience.

Also, I've been told (by experts), that any seed from a grafted fruit will not bear true to form. It could be because of the 'rootstock'? Grafted trees grow true to form & bear a known variety, eg, Hass.

Mind you, some of my old seedling avocado trees do produce good (but strange looking) fruit, and yes, some do have large seeds.
Best idea, plant both types :)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
25th February 2010 8:38am
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
The story of the original Hass avocado tree makes interesting reading

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hass_avocado

Of course the tree lives on as millions of scions/grafts/budwood all over the world. Seeds however have two parents so you will get the characteristics of both in the resulting plant, rarely duplicating the original.
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
25th February 2010 12:17pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Phil,
Thanks for the Hass (& avocado) info, very good.

On the other hand, if you plant an avocado seed from a 'seedling' avocado tree, you will get the same tree / fruit as the parent.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
26th February 2010 8:05am
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Grubs says...
Well sorry but I still dont "get it". If the wikipedia page says

"All Hass avocado trees have been grown from seeds (or were grafted from the cuttings) of a single tree which was grown from a seed purchased in 1926 from A. R. Rideout of Whittier, California"

Then I dont see how seeds from a Hass avocado can grow into anything else! If it were grafted - the seed would still produce the fruiting plant...albeit perhaps with inferior roots (wouldn't it??).

I'm not doubting your experience Brendan... just head scratching!
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68
Melbourne
26th February 2010 11:26pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Grubs,
I think wikipedia means, "all the Hass grown from seed, were from seeds *that came out of* the seedling trees (fruit) Mr Rideout grew from the one Hass seed."?
And as they say, "or were grafted from cuttings", from the true Hass seedling trees.

Phil tells us 'seeds' have two parents. I will add, unless they come from a seedling tree. For some reason, it's only the seeds from the grafted trees, that have two parents? (I think :-)

It is confusing, I agree.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
27th February 2010 8:51am
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Jason says...
Hass in South West Victoria (colder than Melbourne), I've been trying my very best to explain that you want to be growing a type A tree in Victoria and mostly a Hass but not many seem to listen. Anyway picture proof :)

Complete picture of the tree
http://img.skitch.com/20100510-58wb3915nyw22x5fpq9t4ahqp.jpg
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Jason
Portland. Vic
14th May 2010 1:54am
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Original Post was last edited: 14th May 2010 1:58am
Phil@Tyalgum says...
That Hass tree is bursting with vigour Jason, kudos to you for doing so well in southern Vic. Good to see you on this forum as well, keep posting!
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
14th May 2010 5:14am
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Jantina says...
Jason you're back! I have a seedling lucuma for you , please respond if you still want it.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
14th May 2010 11:11am
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Jason says...
Phil, thanks, it's a pretty good one, what I really want is a Reed tree in similar health but never seem to be able to get a good one going (yet).

Hi Jantina, sure I still don't have one. I have a a couple spare bananas in pots still. You'll have to come over for some bit's of trees if you want to do some grafting in Winter/Spring too. I also have a heap of sapotes almost ripe if you want seeds of those?
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Jason
Portland. Vic
15th May 2010 8:59am
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Jantina says...
Thanks Jason I would be very happy to get those sapote seeds, the bananas and some grafting material when the time is right.I did ring the phone no. you gave me last time but a lady answered and said she'd never heard of you. I have two different sorts of lucuma. If you want email me at jantinarohde at activ8 dot net dot au to make arrangements.
By the way, I have a Reed growing well here. Got it from Bunnings of all places but it was so healthy looking I couldn't resist.
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Jantina
Mt. Gambier S.A.
15th May 2010 11:16am
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Matt says...
Jason,

Your tree looks fantastic. Looks healthy and really good looking fruit. If you don't mind posting, I would be really keen to know what type of regiment you have got it on for pest control and what type of fertiliser you are using, if any.

Also how did you propagate and did you use a root stock?

Love the tree and thanks in advance.

Matt.
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Matt8
Prahran, VIC
22nd June 2010 4:15pm
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Nick says...
does anyone know where to get avocado budwood for grafting. Ive finally had success germinating a seed and it would be a waste not to graft it.
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Nick T
Altona VIC
4th July 2010 5:43pm
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Jason says...
Matt, sorry I missed this. That Hass tree is grafted onto a Zutano seed (I bought from commerical stock already gafted) I have other trees I've grafted using various seed which grow well but most of the plants I've got from commercial suppliers are on Zutano seedlings for whatever reason, just tradition I think rather than any advantage. I haven't done anything for pests, there's no Avocado pests here apart from some grub that eats holes in the leaves in Spring but not enough to be of any worry.

Each spring I skim the grass off the dirt out to the drip line and throw it under the tree and fertilize it, any small sticks I find around the place get thrown under there also. For the fist 6 years (that tree is about 7 years old) I fertilized it with chicken manure only, not every year but for most of them. Then last year I started using a 3-2-1 chemical fertiliser from Pivot which is making bigger fruit and more growth but it remains to be seen if they will taste as good :). However it's lots cheaper than manure so that's what I'll be using from now on, at least until the trees are large enough to properly self mulch and generally look after themselves a bit better.

Nick it should be pretty easy to find some Avocado wood in Melbourne, there's thousands of Avocado trees there. But they are not all that easy to graft, I don't think most people manage much better than 50% first time out
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
5th July 2010 2:51am
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Jason says...
Today I found an old video I had from some Avocados I grafted in 2003, I've uploaded it. Hopefully you can see the shapes I cut them (tried a few but they all worked)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7G5puVXa8M
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
17th July 2010 8:15pm
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Original Post was last edited: 17th July 2010 8:18pm
J says...
I've done some reading and apparently there's two types of rootstock:

Mexican and Guatemalen.

Which type of rootstock would be better suited for Victorian climates?
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J
Belgrave, VIC
19th July 2010 8:34am
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Jason says...
I don't think it makes much difference here really but since the Guatemalan trees seem to have a growing advantage in "cool" (not cold) climates then maybe they have some small advantage. Still the commercial orchards around Mildura in Northern Vic and Southern NSW that are not using clonal rootstocks do use Mexican seed for rootstocks
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
20th July 2010 4:34am
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Nick says...
Thanks Jason but the thing is I dont have any idea what a avocado tree looks like (apart from seedlings). I'm willing to swap budwood of lime, feijoa, peach, apple or passionfruit with anyone with avocado wood to spare.
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Nick T
Altona, VIC
20th July 2010 6:05pm
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J says...
Thanks Jason, I'll be picking up a hass and El fuerto based on your recommendations.
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J
Belgrave, VIC
20th July 2010 7:37pm
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Jason says...
Nick there's a picture of my Hass tree in full in this thread with a plastic chair in front of it for size comparison. It's about 7-8 years old in the far South of Victoria.

This is the link

http://img.skitch.com/20100510-58wb3915nyw22x5fpq9t4ahqp.jpg

^

You could keep the tree at that height if you wanted to prune it say 1/4 of the tree each year or so. I haven't pruned mine since there's room there for it to grow as big as it wants to be. Don't let anyone tell you Hass is no good for Victoria, I've tried at least 10 varieties and that's clearly the best tree I have.

You need to wait until at least October and maybe better November+ to graft an Avocado in Victoria so you have plenty of time yet
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
21st July 2010 3:07am
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Original Post was last edited: 21st July 2010 3:11am
Brendan says...
Hi Jason,
Nice avo tree, you've done well!
Is there some 'ripe' Hass I can see on the tree? I suppose with that many on, you can't eat them all!
Have you found that the riper the fruit is picked, the better they taste?
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
21st July 2010 6:56am
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J says...
Jason, that's a good looking tree and just the right size imho. I've done some more reading and avocado roots are meant to be quite invasive and can choke out other trees. I plan on planting trees about 3 to 4 metres apart. Have any of your trees nearby been affected by your hass? They seem pretty groovy in the pic.
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J
Belgrave, VIC
22nd July 2010 10:58am
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Jason says...
Brendan there's ripe fruit on the tree in that picture but most of the exposed fruit you can see are the fruit higher up on the branches and are next years crop. Because it takes around 18 months on the tree to grow a Hass fruit here, you have two crops on the tree at all times, they are ripe around March-April and hang over Winter and slowly turn black until September, they they will start droping and there wont be any of the current years crop left after maybe October. Right now they have slightly split seeds and are about perfect maturity wise. I have the opinion the colder it is and the longer you can keep an Avocado on the tree before it's ripe the better it tastes, much like grapes :). That's how it seems to be anyway, I've tasted Hass all around the place and they taste best in Southern Victoria and up realllllly high in the mountains in Mexico.

I am able to eat all the Avocados on that tree myself if I eat 2 or 3 a day, which I do most days :). Once that tree is done the Mexican varieties are almost ripe, I get a month Avocado fruit rest up before hand but the crops almost line up. Then I get another Avocado rest from February to March-April but that's prime Stone fruit time so really I don't want any Avocados during that time.

J, that's a Macadamia tree right beside the Avocado of very similar size and there seems no competition between them. Avocado roots are all within 6 inches of the surface and you can bring them up right to surface level with a heavy sticks kind of mulch. Not many other trees have roots so close to the surface, so I don't think there's any real problem with root competition. I have two rows of Avocados about 4 meters apart over the other side of the garden, actually right smack in the middle of a established stone fruit orchard. That happened because my Father didn't think I would be able to grow them so we planted them in there for some shelter :0, now they tower over the other trees that get pruned to a nestable height.

I like how Hass looks because the tree is kinda a round dense shape, the upright ones look a bit straggly
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
23rd July 2010 3:04am
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd July 2010 3:07am
allybanana says...
Nick if you want grafting wood I just collected some, according to the CSIRO grafting book end of July is the best time to collect wood as starch content is at its highest just before it starts its growth. Then store in fridge until rootstock growth starts, budding is done later as mentioned above, I collected fuerte and bacon wood from my friends orchard the bacon is already undergoing bud growth so it might be a bit late but try anyway. My friends fuerte is a good self pollinator and good fruiter and handles the frost, but fruit is a bit bumpy so maybe it was mislabelled and is in fact a Hass. Any way if you want some wood I can send you some. I wouldn’t mind some Fuji or pink lady apple wood or other reasonably low chill apple wood. If you can get nashi other than 20 century I would also be interested. My Email address allydalton.sculpture@Gmail.com

cheers ally
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Eden
23rd July 2010 11:38pm
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Nick says...
That sounds good allybanana. I don't want to disappoint you but I don't have a clue what type of apple I have but it is a quite old tree (20 or so y.o) and flowers heavily so I consequently have tonnes of wood. Also what are Nashis? I've also just remembered I can give you plum (heavy bearer, great fruit) or pear wood.
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Altona, VIC
24th July 2010 6:20pm
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Jason says...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHOrR0OE6eE

I've had a productive day, didn't quite have the settings on the camera right but anyway! it's kinda ok in 720p HD. I'll be uploading more as the night goes on, just so people can get in idea of the fruiting and flowering progress of various trees at this time of year. And just how each tree looks in general
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24th July 2010 6:47pm
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Phil@Tyalgum says...
How old would you say that Bacon tree is Jason? It even makes me green with envy. What other cultivars do you have?
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phil@tyalgum
Murwillumbah
24th July 2010 7:02pm
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Jason says...
That ones about 9 years old, it's taller than it appears in the video. MIght be 12 feet tall or something like that, maybe more?. I'm not sure :). Still that's about 3 years worth for you :). This is the first big crop it's had, some years it will have hardly any, where Hass has a big crop every year without fail, that's one of the reasons why I like it better. I'm uploading a video of Rincon now. I filmed a fair bit of stuff today, a lot of things aren't in real good form during Winter but it'll be good to compare them later on
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24th July 2010 7:19pm
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Jason says...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08CKtbhmYoI

Rincon, the ground cover Avocado :P
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24th July 2010 7:59pm
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Brad says...
thanks for that. I bought a Rincon for my dad in law, and didn't realise it was that... prostrate for want of a better word

have you trained it horizontal and it will now come up a little or is that the natural shape so far?
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Brad2
Como, Perth
24th July 2010 8:52pm
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Jason says...
I haven't touched it Brad that's just how it's grown, I guess sometimes they might grow up a bit more but I doubt it has potential to be more than 6 feet tall, it would be 15 feet wide before it made 6 foot
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24th July 2010 9:45pm
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Jason says...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRCBchxz0yQ

There's the Hass tree, I think I'll re film the other trees later now that I have the camera more sorted
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Portland, Vic
24th July 2010 11:10pm
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Dave says...
Great videos Jason, good to see advocado doing so well in Melbourne. I just bought a few seedlings from diggers; 2 hass, a wurtz and bacon. When do you think is the optimum time to put them in the ground? They are sitting in my greenhouse at the moment, just worried the winter cold might get to them at the moment
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Dave
The Dandenongs, Vic
3rd August 2010 11:15pm
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Jason says...
Dave the cold wont hurt them even when tiny unless your seeing below 0c. Probably aim to plant them any time after August 15th. But once you reach that date the soon the better, the faster the roots can develop in the first season in the ground the better.

My trees are growing over in the South West of Victoria, it's about 3c colder overnight than inner Melbourne on average. But comparable to most towns well outside the city
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
4th August 2010 2:13am
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Dave says...
Thanks Jason, good info. That sounds about right for my block...we are on a sloping orchard and the frost settles on the lower area where I've put my apples, pears and plums, the higher part is where I'm planting my evergreens including the advocado, it has a few nice size trees so it is quite well protected and has a slightly warmer micro climate. We have great soil up here so interested to see how quickly they grow.
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Dave
The Dandenongs, Vic
4th August 2010 10:13am
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J says...
Dave, I see you are in the dandenongs. How do you stop the possums from eating all your plums, pears etc? Any tips?

Jason, I'll be picking up a Hass and Fuerto in two weeks based on your recommendations. I was going to wait till september till I put them in but I might put them in straight way based again on your recommedations.
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J
Belgrave, VIC
4th August 2010 12:36pm
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Dave says...
Hey J, yeah we get some great wildlife up here and thats why I live up here also but they also love the fruit. We have possums like you said, also rats who eat dropped fruit mostly, fruit bats occassionally that can devour a whole tree of fruit in a night, birds birds birds of every variety, wallabies, echidnas, and more. I am still learning what methods work best in terms of keeping them out but I have found star pickets stuck in the ground past the dripline then place some polyprop or irrigation pipe over the pickets joining one end to one picket then place over tree to meet the star picket on other side of tree. They cross over and then you can loosely tie them in place if you like. Then I put my netting over the top which is clear of all foliage by as much as possible (usually around 30-50cm) and drape it to the ground. From here you can place anything to hold it firmly taut to the ground, I use bend wire stakes as they are cheap to make from left over fencing wire, you can use rocks, wood, tent pegs, etc but make sure its strong enough to withstand critters pushing into it. Also another note, is research netting before just buying from anywhere, I have a great local supplier who buys a quality New Zealand made net, some nets just break too easily. This method has worked on most of my trees so far but bigger trees you'll have to use other methods, also if you have a big orchard you will benefit from investing in a good netting setup, pine posting at ends of each row with wire joined at top is a good start to drape netting, these days growers have a netting roof over their whole orchard (expensive though!)
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Dave
The Dandenongs, Vic
4th August 2010 2:15pm
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Jason says...
We have an enormous amount of parrots here so in order to get any fruit at all we need to net every tree, which we do. Bush rats eat fallen fruit but there's no or next to no possums. Have a few issues with kangaroos eating leaves that are not above 6 feet tall but apart from that, no problems with animals. There'a few rabbits around but they aren't problem once the trees are over a couple feet tall and certainly do no damage compared to a kangaroo anyway.

Still it's much better to have Kangaroos jumping around and the odd leaf stripped Avocado tree than no Kangaroos :).

Dave, don't plant anything evergreen that needs lots of water over summer too far up the slope if it gets dryer up there in Summer than down low, I'd put them as far down as you can where is stays above 0c. Water ends up far more important than shelter or cold nights, trust me on that since I already made that mistake :). Fair enough if the bottom of your block is seeing -5c in Winter but if it's only 0c or even -2 I'd plant the Avocados lower than you have planned. Bananas, Babaco and sensitive stuff like that plant where there's zero chance of below 0c
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
5th August 2010 4:13am
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J says...
Dave, who is your local supplier for nets? I might get some through them.

Jason, do parrots eat your Avocados,white sapotes and cherimoya too?
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J
Belgrave, VIC
5th August 2010 12:10pm
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Jason says...
Birds can't eat Avocado (it kills them) they seem to know that and don't even attempt it. Ring eyes eat White sapotes but only once they are super ripe (after you would have picked them if you were going to), ring eyes also eat mandarins, parrots don't eat white sapote or mandarins but they love all the more common fruits that they know about. If your growing an unusual fruit it normally takes them a year or two to figure out that it's edible or that the flowers are. However once they figure it out they never forget and teach the rest of them :). In the last few years the parrots figure out they could get nectar
from inside apricot flowers, so none of the flowers have actually stayed on the tree long enough to pollinate. Which is a pain because they never used to eat Apricots. The only way around this is to keep enough Apples over Winter to make a sacrifice to the great parrot gods to keep them occupied while the Apricots flower :)

Nothing eats Cherimoya since you pick them hard and they have thick skin etc.

In any case once the trees start producing and you live in a rural area you will need nets.

Unless you only grow Avocados :)
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
5th August 2010 2:16pm
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Original Post was last edited: 5th August 2010 2:17pm
J says...
Sounds like my future avocados are safe :)

So basically your white sapotes are safe until they become ripe. Thats good news. But it sounds like I'm going to need nets for my bluberries.
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J
Belgrave, VIC
5th August 2010 3:19pm
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Dave says...
Hey J, here is the link to the supplier I use, the site has a few pics of different methods I was talking about too: http://www.monbulkrural.com.au/Bird_net.htm

Jason, thanks for the info, so many considerations on placement : ) water, wind, temp, frost, etc ..fun to balance all these things (I mean it, like the challenge)
I'm putting in some gravity fed tanks higher up the slope (the water is pumped from the large dam at the bottom of my neighbours property which is great) and going to dripfeed when needed.

Also, the White Sapote - would that sit well beside the advos and if so how close do you think it could go beside it? considering roots and such, thoughts?
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Dave
The Dandenongs, Vic
5th August 2010 3:26pm
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J says...
thanks dave. I'll be picking some up shortly.
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J
Belgrave, VIC
5th August 2010 9:43pm
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Jason says...
Dave, I always wanted to try growing a fast growing wattle at 1x1 meter all over a property then cut out 5 meter circles every time I wanted to plant a tree :), that would have cured just about any establishment problem anyone could have. But failing that planting them pretty close together is probably the best bet. Originally spaced mine at 5 meters but it takes so long to get them to join together and shade out the grass, really it's a waist of time. Next time I'd plant them closer and cut out any extras, or just let the strongest survive etc
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
6th August 2010 8:41am
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Rob says...
Jason it seems you have quite a avacado collection. Have you had any luck growing gwen or a wurtz in melbourne. Because my Gwen looks alittle sick.
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Rob8
Box Hill Melb.
10th August 2010 6:39am
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Jason says...
Rob, I'm not in Melbourne but anything that grows here will be easier in Melbourne. I have both Wurtz and Gwen doing ok, they are both naturally small trees so don't grow as vigorously as most varieties. Every year since I've had the Wurtz Kangaroos have stripped all it's leaves off (100%) so it's still tiny but it does grow well in between the times they eat all the leaves :). I probably should put a guard around it but since I have enough Avocados to eat now I don't worry too much about that
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Jason10
Portland, Vic
10th August 2010 10:22am
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Rob says...
Has anyone seen any Hass or Wurtz trees for sale in Vic or on the net of late? Or is it the wrong time? Struggling to find them anywhere.
Thanks
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Rob10
Torquay
14th August 2010 2:04pm
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J says...
Rob, I picked up a Gwen and Fuerte at Sheperds Nursery at Hastings.

http://www.aussieweb.com.au/business/shepherds+nurseries/1902884/

There's a nice dude that runs the place. They had wurtz, rincon, sharwil, fuerte, bacon and Some hass, but the hass did not look very healthy. Which is why I ended up getting the gwen. I didn't realise the gwen wasn't a big tree (mines about a meter tall).

Jason, will the gwen be ok to pollinate the Fuerte and vice-versa? How is your gwen going? Is it fruiting yet?
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J
Belgrave, VIC
14th August 2010 6:34pm
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j says...
My gwen seems to be flowering but its only a meter tall and supported by a stake. Should I be plucking the flowers off and let the tree get a bit bigger before I allow it to flower and fruit? Does bearing fruit early on Avocado's impede the trees development?
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J
 
21st October 2010 9:16am
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Jason says...
Gwen does that, It'll set fruit at any size and I did pull the flowers and fruit off mine for a year or two. I would be pulling it off in the interests of not dwarfing the tree because it takes a lot of energy to make an avocado. Better to buy 5 avocados this year instead in the interest of not having to buy them in the future :). The kangaroos ate most of the leaves and small branches on my Gwen the other day but not enough to really harm the tree. Just enough to make it look like one big near leafless avocado flower :p. I'm guessing your Fuerte is flowering right now also? or didn't it flower this year (they take a while to get going). Also if you can make it a bit loose on the stake otherwise it wont learn to harden up

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Jason
Portland
21st October 2010 12:44pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st October 2010 12:45pm
j says...
Ok, Jason I will pluck the flowers off later this week. And thanks for tip about the loosening it on the stake. Its tied quite firmly on!

My Fuerte has dropped some of its larger leaves and is poping out new leaves now but no flowers that I can tell.

I picked up a Hass from daleys because I had some room in my last order. Its just under a foot tall and I hope it does well here. No leaves dropped but now new leaves seem to be forming either. I'm kinda kicking myself that I didn't wait and find a bigger hass here locally. I was at an whole sale nursery the other day I saw a Hass about three times bigger than mine. it was almost 1 meter and half tall!
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J
 
21st October 2010 2:41pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st October 2010 2:43pm
Jason says...
It's usually better to start with a small Avocado as freshly grafted as you can find. I've bought big ones before and they just do nothing then die, totally useless. Thats a pretty good rule for any kind of tree buying really
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Jason
Portland
21st October 2010 6:50pm
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j says...
Well that's good news for my avocado's. My gwen's leaves are a little bit yellowish/Light green, is that normal?

Also about smaller tree's being a better than bigger ones; that's a bit worrying in regards to my 2 pike and vista white sapotes. They're 2 years old.. but they've survived this winter and are growing new leaves. The rest of my trees where all bought when they were young.
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J
 
21st October 2010 7:56pm
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Jason says...
I've had sapotes about 2.5 or even 3 foot tall from Perrys that have gone on to grow well, but those were really high quality well grown trees in deep plastic bags, but still they are outgrown x2 by trees I've planted in the ground straight after germinating and then grafted them while in the ground but it's much more important with Avocados, it's really hard to get them to go again once they have been restricted. Sapotes are more like weeds, very tough trees. Gwen should be dropping leaves anytime soon so it will be drawing the nutrients out of them and making them turn yellow.

With the sapotes keep an eye on the leaves and size the leaves grow to, maybe take a picture of them once the leaves are full size with a ruler and I'll tell you if you need more nitrogen on them or not.

With the Avocados I gauge the fertiliser by the length of the flower stems once the fruit has set and grown. For years I had hass fruit on short stems and couldn't figure out why the stems on commercial orchards of Hass were so long. Seems I just needed more juice on them. This current crop of Hass are already the same size as the crop I just ate and they still have 6 months before they will be ready to pick
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Jason
Portland
21st October 2010 8:59pm
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j says...
Jason, one day I'll get to the stage where I will be able to graft my own stuff but that day ain't here yet, so all the info you are providing me with is solid gold.

I'm hoping my gwen, fuerte and hass get a good size before next winter. I'll be getting some shade cloth for summer.

As far as my gwen flowering, I'm morbidly curious to see if the gwen will set any fruit without a pollinator, and if it does I'll abort em. But if I was to pluck the flowers off, is there any correct or incorrect way to do that, or is it just like citrus: Pluck away?
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J
 
21st October 2010 9:55pm
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Jason says...
I just break most of the flower stem off, the rest soon falls away. I'm also interested to see if it sets fruit by itself. I expect it will, but mine as always had a type B tree nearby so I can't be 100% sure. Have you got some mulch around the Avocados? if you can run some that's fairly rich in goodness out to a couple/few feet past the drip line they will grow pretty quick.

If I can't get mulch around mine I put the fertiliser just past the drip line then when that grass booms I cut it out pull it out and use that for mulch. Running like an ever expanding moat around the end of the layer of dropped leaves, that helps hold the leaves under the tree rather than blow away, then it self mulches out to a point. The roots on the avocados are so shallow pulling up grass tends to pull up Avocado roots with it, just a good example of why you want mulch on them really :). My Hass tree that's doing really well gets the grass mulch moat theory ^ and a few sticks thrown under there for good messure
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Jason
Portland
22nd October 2010 11:24am
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j says...
I've just gotten some 2 square metres of bush mulch delivered and am in the process of spreading it around the back yard. It's essentially the bush ground up. Cheap stuff, but a mixture of fine and chunky material, which I've read is the best way to go. I will put some around the avo's (and all my other trees) shortly.

Yes, I think I might leave the flowers on the gwen and see if they form some fruit and then pluck everything off.

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J
 
22nd October 2010 11:37am
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Jason says...
The mulch sounds good :) I know a guy that uses the stuff that comes from the guys that prune the trees along highways and it works well for him
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Jason
Portland
22nd October 2010 11:40am
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Brendan says...
Hi Jason & J,
They call that stuff 'forest mulch' here, It is good (& cheap), but I reckon it comes with it's own built in Termites!
I might be wrong, as I do have termites here :-(
Every time I get some, it's not long before it's full of termites, which is ok I suppose, as they help it to break down.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
23rd October 2010 8:01am
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amanda says...
Hi J, I use this mulch extensively and have found that it makes my sand more water repellant. It's good but what type of soil do u have? I imagine it would be ok on clay.

Mine is from Hwy trimmings etc and mostly Eucalypt and Acacia.

It's fine around my native gardens - but around the fruit trees it needs to have a constant nitrogen source, to avoid nitrogen draw down, as it decomposes. Which can be a very long time in a dry zone.

Not saying don't use it - but keep and eye on it around your fruit trees maybe.
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amanda19
Geraldton Mid West WA
23rd October 2010 12:34pm
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Jason says...
Brendan we have _billions_ of termites flying all around, thick in the sky sometimes, I was just watching the bats eat them as they took off the other night actually. But since they are everywhere naturally it wont matter if they are also in the mulch. Steel framed houses are popular here near the bush, for this reason and being a bit more fire proofed
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Jason
Portland
23rd October 2010 3:40pm
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd October 2010 3:41pm
j says...
Amanda, my soil here is dark rich heavy mountain soil which is acidic. I'm pretty much using this mulch on my fruit trees. This area is a bit cooler than melbourne and fairly wet/moist most of the time, except for summer.

Haven't noticed any termites in the mulch, but there is always termites around these parts.

As I said before I got this mulch because it was cheap and it had the right mixture of chunky and fine material. There's an element of recycling when using this stuff and that makes my inner hippie happy.
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J
 
24th October 2010 12:54pm
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Original Post was last edited: 24th October 2010 12:57pm
Jon says...
Wow this thread has grown since last year. Martin, I got my Gwen from Sunraysia Nurseries who also deliver. 03 50248643 is theur number.

I have had some probmels with my trees lately and I'm hoping someone will know what it is.

1. My trees have cankers on the trunks.

2. There are some black spots on the branches.

3. The leaves have had holes appearing in them, with little brown dead spots forming before falling out.

4. I'm not sure if the roots appear healthy. Some seem reddy orange, some seem white and some black.

I've uploaded some photos in the next few posts so hopefully someone knows what's going on.

We've had heavy rain recently but the soil is pretty sandy and I've used a little groundbreaker in the past. I don't fertilise it but I have put a little little bit of horse manure on previously. Is this bad?

Thanks,

Jon
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6

Picture: 7

Picture: 8
 
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Jon2
Melbourne's East
24th October 2010 1:28pm
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Jon says...
Some more pictures.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6

Picture: 7
  
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Jon2
Melbourne's East
24th October 2010 1:31pm
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Jason says...
Jon, the trees look fine, don't know how long for if you keep digging the roots up and cutting them off :) but I don's see anything abnormal. Bit of sunburn or impact damage on the branches maybe but nothing not normal
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Jason
Portland
24th October 2010 1:41pm
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Jon says...
Really? That's relieving :) And that's the first time I've dug up the roots so it should be okay.

Is there anything I could do about the cankers in pictures 3 and 7 in my first post? The picture 3 one looks nasty. And I shouldn't worry about the leaves?

Thanks,

Jon

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Jon2
Melbourne's East
24th October 2010 1:45pm
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Original Post was last edited: 24th October 2010 1:45pm
Jason says...
Those holes will heal up pretty fast, the leaves look fine. You can give it some fertiliser and mulch, with avocados when they are growing very fast they get a kind of blocky shaped new growth with spots on it, that's what you want to aim for. I'll try and get a picture of that in a few weeks once mine are finished flowering and get into full new growth mode
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Jason
Portland
24th October 2010 7:21pm
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Jon says...
Should I paint the cankers with something or use some kind of fungicide?
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Jon2
Melbourne's East
30th October 2010 10:38am
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Jason says...
I wouldn't worry about it, they look like they are healing already. You can tell I don't worry much about Avocados, I guess it's because I haven't been able to kill an Avocado apart from during very hot and dry summers. Apart from that they seem pretty indestructible
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Jason
Portland
30th October 2010 12:00pm
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j says...
I was in Monbulk today and saw an 8 year old ten foot tall Fuerte that was busy flowering and a Slightly smaller hass that had flowered and fruited.

Monbulk's a bit higher than where I am and apparently they usually get 1 day of snow a year, so those avocado's have survived snow as well. Pretty impressive.
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J
 
30th October 2010 8:53pm
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Dave says...
I'm living just outside of monbulk J...the advocados I planted end of winter have been going great. The last few weeks they have put on lots of new growth. They are in a good sheltered sloping spot which gets little frost to no frost. We do get snow usually once a year, none as yet for this year, but hey it snowed at Christmas time a few years back if you remember so it still may happen. A few of my neighbours have advocado and they do ok too.
Well this rain today has been great, prolly won't need to water the orchard for at least a month looking at the forecast. Looks like the catchments will finally get over 50% capacity, been a long time since they were above this mark!
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Dave
Dandenongs
30th October 2010 11:43pm
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j says...
well that's also good to hear, dave.

I planted my gwen, fuerte and hass on a fairly uncertain hope that they would survive, but seeing/reading about all these other trees near by doing well, well that's great.

Dave, how much new growth has your fuerte formed? Full new leaves or just little leaflets popping out?
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31st October 2010 4:50pm
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Dave says...
J, The varieties I planted were Bacon, Wurtz and Hass and two of each for now. I also have a few seedling advocados that are between 3-5 years but not fruiting yet. The Bacon and Wurtz seem to be the best growing ones so far for me and have put on full sets of large leaves. The Hass are doing well too but smaller 2 inch leaves so far, one is putting out lots of flowers. They are on a north west facing slope on the edge of some euca. forest so they get good sun and shelter. On another note the rest of the fruit trees have stacks of fruit this year, every flower must have been pollinated, especially the old cherry, pear and apple trees.
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Dave
Dandenongs
1st November 2010 2:26pm
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j says...
thanks for the info dave, I think I might get a bacon as well so I have two A's and Two B's. Wait, you actually get fruit from your cherry, pear and apple tree? what about the possums? What area of the dandenongs do you live in and how do you control the bastards?
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1st November 2010 8:09pm
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Original Post was last edited: 1st November 2010 8:09pm
Dave says...
Yes I have trained the possums to harvest the fruit for us and drop them at the fruit door, they get to eat some as their reward.
Really the possums and birds do get a bit, but we net a few quite well so they don't get those, a couple of the large cherries and one of the pears I have cut down to a manageable size so they are easily netted, the trick is I found was to keep the netting at least a foot away from any foliage/fruit and keep netting quite taut (with good quality netting) using a framework underneath of polyprop.
crossing over the trees.
I remember the cherry tree without netting last year that had a full load of cherries that the possums devoured but they left me one ripe cherry, yes only one that was hidden between a couple of well placed leaves, but it was sweet to find it!
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Dave
Dandenongs
1st November 2010 10:30pm
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Jason says...
heh, we will be netting the Cherries any day now. As soon as they change from green to half a slight tinge of Pink on them the parrots will say.. that's close enough
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Jason
Portland
2nd November 2010 12:32pm
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Jason says...
I just wanted to write in here before I forget. A while ago I noticed in some healthy commercial orchard than the length of stems on the fruit on Hass was muuuuch longer then they were on my tree, since then for the last couple of years I've been slowly sneaking up on my good Hass tree with more nitrogen and the entire tree is getting stronger but I'm using the length of stem on the fruit to gauge where I'm at. Three years ago I had stems about....3 inched long at best case. Last years crop was maybe 4, the current crop 4-6. Next years crop has also set (massive crop btw in the order of hundreds of fruit) and I've got stems on the fruit up to 8 inches, that's about the same as the commercial tree I was using as a gauge so I think I'll try and maintain the tree just as it is now. I should be making a video about this tomorrow anyway and how I'm looking after this tree
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Jason
Portland
27th December 2010 2:36am
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Brendan says...
I suppose this is a stupid question Jason, why do you want your Hass avocados to have long stems? Is is for ease of picking or something?
BTW, have a happy new year :-)!
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
27th December 2010 8:30am
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Evo says...
First avocado fruit in Melbourne. I have three trees next to each other; hass, Fuerte and bacon. Trees are around 5-6 years old.
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lionfish
 
27th December 2010 10:05am
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Jason says...
Brendan, no reason, it's just a gauge/measure for me to see the overall health of the tree :). Seems a more accurate way of telling rather than seeing the leaves which have been looking fine for years. I could wait and see how much it grows during a year but looking at the stems lets me see what's going on earlier in the season. I'm on 2 feet of growth so far since it's flowered in Octoberish, it's been an amazing Spring/Sumnmer for rain so far, easily the best in the last 10 years so I'm expecting some records in growth this year on everything :).

Evo, good job on the Hass, the Fuerte might take a bit longer to fruit
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Jason
Portland
27th December 2010 10:44pm
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Andrew says...
Gidday Jason, just starting to plan for Avocados on our block of land, is there any chance of catching up with you to discuss your success with this sp. and other interesting sp. that you grow in our area?, cheers Andrew
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Andrew14
Mt Clay
3rd January 2011 9:07pm
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Wayne says...
Am currently growing about a dozen avocado trees in southern victoria , and had a couple of questions for Jason (or anyone else)

What is your favourite fertilizer and how often do you apply ? and what is your preferred rootstock for new plants.


I'm growing bacon hass and reed at the moment , I notice no-one mentions reed much - they have been the most productive of the 3 so far and seem to do very well in our climate - very healthy and hardy trees


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Island
11th January 2011 12:33pm
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Jason says...
Hi Wayne I have two small Reed trees and currently grafting over some seedlings to Reed (just did one yesterday actually). It does just as well as Hass being a similar kind of tree but I hadn't had a good tree until recently (it's a type A Guatemalan so just what you want for Southern VIC) but it is likely to grow taller. Earlier on I wasn't sure if I liked the fruit from Reed because it can be sometimes a bit under ripe in the shops but I've decided I like it now.

I use fertilizer with about 20% nitrogen sprinkled around the drip line, citrus food basically I put it a little before flowering, then don't again until the fruit is set and stuck, then continue to feed them once each couple of months until the last growth flush then I stop for Winter, I try and gauge it from how the tree looks, if it's got a heavy crop and the fruit aren't sizing up at the times they should be I'll add more to compensate. I'm using anything for root stocks there doesn't seem to be seeds from any of the trees having a growth advantage that I can notice yet

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Jason
Portland
12th January 2011 10:12am
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Wayne says...
Thanks for that - all good info.

I have 2 hass atm that have been slower in developing than the Reed and Bacon(I was worried they werent suited to Vic) , but seeing your trees I'm going to put a few more in - maybe I havent been feeding them enough - mainly been using horse manure.

Both trees have got a nice looking crop for next year.

Good luck with the Reed - ours are doing very well - massive fruit and pretty heavy cropping. I notice in several places Reed are called a small tree , they are in fact quite tall.
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ISland
12th January 2011 10:33am
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Jason says...
Yes Reed is supposed to be a much taller tree than Hass, I'd say something more like Bacon. I wouldn't give up on a variety growth wise just because two trees didn't grow as fast. It's like my Reed trees, I just wasn't lucky enough to get a good one. I have a few Hass trees and only one grows like a freak. Sometimes it goes like that you just have to put a heap in and you end up with a few good ones. If you are going to graft some yourself now then that makes it an almost zero cost thing to put a heap in and keep the good ones. I really like the fruit on Bacon and it's good to have Avocados now in the Summer but the length of season on them (short) and the fact that I have 4 or 5? good Bacon trees and the similar Ryan tree which is also good AND a good and one soon to be good Fuerte trees. It means I can't eat them all. So I've been really wanting a good Reed tree for years and years, the first one I bought didn't grow hardly at all, second one was even worse. But now 8? 9? years later the first one has decided to grow. I'm pretty happy about that :). I guess I also have about 12 or maybe 14ish Avocado trees that are winners, and a few duds laying around in the grass. I lost quite a few small ones during a couple of very dry years a while ago.

My Hass is up to about 2 feet in growth so far this year and is carrying hundreds of small fruit for the next next crop. I made a video of it today, I might be able to upload it tomorrow.

I have one fairly large tree that was a mislabeled Zutano, in fact I think a seedling got in the scion bucket at that nursery somehow, anyway it doesn't pollinate at all (seedless tiny fruit) so I'm going to try and graft that entire tree to Reed. I've been planing to do that for a few years, But I've not had a healthy enough Reed tree to get the wood. The unknown tree is about.....20 foot? so I think once I cut it back and graft it it should regrow pretty quickly. I'm not very confidant to do that kind of graft but I have to give it a go. Before I was using chemical fertiliser I was using chicken manure on them and a fair bit of it.

I think everyone in Southern Vic should be growing Avocados, I rekcon 90% of my nutrition comes from Avocado's since I eat 2 or 3 everyday almost all year so it's a bit of an experiment if over eating them is bad long term :0 My father has high blood pressure (he doesn't eat them:P) so I check mine regularly, it's always 105/70 so I'm doing ok so far (at 39, almost 40)
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Jason
 
12th January 2011 9:14pm
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Wayne says...
its odd isnt it - I have 2 Reed that I planted next to each other 3 years ago - one is 6-8 ft tall with massive growth - and the other one doesn't look like its grown more than 4 inches since it was planted.(I'm just about to pull it out and give up on it)

yes the older reeds are about the same height as the bacons (about 10-12 ft ) at 6 yrs old approx.

That hot summer 3 years ago (when it was 42+ for 3 or 4 consecutive days ), most of our fruit dropped off - I had been watering them - but they still dropped.

We are down at Phillip Island - so our climate is probably very similar to yours there in Portland - one of the bonuses of being near the coast is we dont have to worry about frost.


Do you shadecloth the seedlings in summer - or paint the trunks at all ?
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Island
13th January 2011 1:41pm
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Jason says...
The first lot I planted were protected, but I don't bother any more, I might weave some long grass down the wire guards if I get excited but that's about it. I have a lot of resident Kangaroos at the moment (last couple of years) so the days of very small plants that kangaroos like to eat (avocados are one) and expecting them to grow are about done for now :).

I'd say the climates would be pretty close, both being almost totally marine influenced, it makes things grow heaps slower but safer :). 20km further inland and it's consistently anywhere from 4c to 10c warmer than my garden but it also can get down to minus 4 or 5 during Winter that far inland.

I had a strange night tonight standing on a ladder picking Bacon avocados in the pouring rain but it was so warm it was pretty much a shower, had no choice because the fruit are just growing too fast with all this rain and heat and they are starting to split and drop at a pretty rapid rate (as I was picking them even). I picked a little over 100 fruit from 3 trees, that was most of the remaining crop that I hadn't eaten this year. I've left about 50 of the smaller sized fruit on one tree I guess just to see what will happen and give me some fresh avocados for the next few weeks (I hope). I'm going to attempt to make these 100 bigger ones into pulp and freeze them.

I was meaning to ask you what time of the year is the Reed ripe and how long does it hang on? Mine has a few fruit on it now but I'll be waiting 18 months to find out :). From the size they are now I expect it's a month later than Hass on both counts? so say you can pick them June to October? would that be true?

I'm expecting everything to grow faster than I've ever seen it before during the next month because I've never seen the ground this wet during Summer or even anything close to it. Sometimes I'm buying water from a truck by now yet this year the tank is overflowing
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Jason
Portland
14th January 2011 4:26am
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wayne says...
Well the ripening part is something I was going to ask you about actually. I suspect we have been too impatient and have been eating most of them earlier than you.

We pretty much had the bacons through nov and december. and started picking a couple of reed in late december/to now.

The bacons were definitely good to go then though - as a few were dropping , and they were a little bit soft on the tree in november

The Reed fruit are very large ( probably twice as heavy as the hass) . and the ones we have picked have softened in about 7 days. but they do show that a slight wrinkling of the skin when they soften - so I imagine I'll leave it for another month or two before I pick any more.

They taste fine now though - even being early like that. the other interesting thing about reed is you can cut one and put it in the fridge and they don't really go brown like other varieties.

the growing conditions have been insane here for the past few months - we have about 80 fruit trees including the avo's and the orchard has never looked healthier - the trees are loving it


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Island
14th January 2011 9:40am
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Jason says...
Oh really, Reed and the other Guatemalan Avocados like Hass should be a Winter fruit in your climate for sure, it is in New Zealand along with Hass and Lamb Hass (which is really late). I don't go near picking a Hass for 18 months after pollination, at least and that's picking them pretty early and not at the ideal flavour. If the seed coat isn't dark and wont easily separate from the seed then the fruit isn't fully ripe. After the fruit and seed coat are fully developed the seed will crack open and the root start to grow through (Most of my Bacons are at this stage now), the fruit wont actually drop most of the time until the root is just about to break out of the skin or just as it breaks out, because they are evolved to hit the ground and grow right then and there. Hass wont start to grow roots here until maybe August 22 months, yep that's right Twenty Two months after pollination, I'd be really surprised if Reed didn't hang for that long also.

I was picking Bacon in November also but they didn't get to full flavour/richness until late December. You could probably pick them even in October and still get "shop quality" Avocados but that's not the aim of the game when you are growing your own, you might be a little warmer than than me but it wouldn't be any more than few weeks or a month at the most worth of warmer
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Jason
Portland
14th January 2011 3:53pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th January 2011 3:55pm
Chris H says...
Hi All,
I've just read this thread end to end because I'm really trying to decide whether to take a punt and try and grow a couple (or more) of avocado trees in beautiful high, cold country Oberon.

1200 metres. Heat Zone 4. Cold Zone 8.

We get frost any time of year and have had snow on both Xmas Day and New Year's Day.

Plenty of space, very good soil and plenty of water. Winds can be pretty rough in Winter but I have good sheltered north-east facing areas.

Temps do get down below zero on a regular basis throughout Winter. Minus 5 was the lowest last year. Maximums rarely go over 30.

Am I on a hiding to nowhere? Or would planting trees each in their own heavy hessian-covered 'cubby house' 2x2x2 metres and open only facing north-east give them two or three years of growing time to get tough?

After being here for 20 years and getting only two decent tomato crops off - and never capsicum or eggplant - I took a deep breath and invested in a glasshouse in Spring. The end result has been fantastic. (See pic)

So, having solved the Summer vegie problem I'm now moving on to fruit tree challenges. Apples, pears, nashis do fine (except for this year when we got a -5 degree frost when they were in early bloom).

Avocados are up there with citrus and stone fruit on my must-have list. It's beating the Spring frosts that's the real hard bit.

But this is an avocado thread, not general vegie & fruit growing, so I shouldn't digress. Please, does anyone have any ideas for cold, high country avocado growing?

Cheers
Chris H

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Chris H
Oberon NSW
16th January 2011 3:04pm
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Jason says...
There are Avocados that could do it but it's just a matter of if you can get them in Australia. -8c is the limit for the most hardy of the Avocado so if you get below that it's going to be a bit hard. But you are going to have to go with varieties different to the ones that grow well on the coast.

You will need pure breed Mexican strains like Zutano, Ettinger, Fuerte, maaaaaaybe Bacon but that one will be touch and go. Even better probably seedlings from parents like those. Still you wont be able to keep them at colder than -5c for an entire night, a few hours should be ok. Jackie French has good success with Avocados to the West? of Canberra, she's written that they get to -8c and does have a lot of fruit Avocados there (a lot of hers are seedlings I believe). Once you do get varieties that will survive the cold the next problem is having warm enough weather to pollinate them. Anyway if you do have plenty of space seedlings are going to be the way to go, they will be stronger and you'll have a good chance of getting a type A flowered Mexican avocado, which is ideally what you want. OR you could find someone that has adapted seedlings Avocados in a cool climate similar to yours and graft from those. You will need to start the Avocados inside something more hardy. I remember reading Jackie French saying hers come up from under overgrown stuff and she doesn't know they are there until the poke out already a few years old.

Citrus, well Satsuma mandarin's will take pretty close to -10c I think? easily better than -5c anyway.

You will need to plant all this stuff on a decent slope to keep the cold air running past them and not sitting still, I'm not sure how much cold the flowers can take but ideally you would want very late flowering varieties, Avocados can hold fruit for years so if the cold doesn't kill the fruit and if you have low heat and that makes them flower later. That will probably be a good thing :0 You will really be pushing the limits of the tree but I think it's close enough to be worth a shot
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Jason
Portland
16th January 2011 5:31pm
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Original Post was last edited: 16th January 2011 5:34pm
Ral says...
I just read this forum end to end also ... very interesting! I am very new to gardening to be honest but I have some questions about Hass Avocados
- Can you plant a Hass avocado in isolation or do you need to plant it with another tree?
- What is the smallest space you could grow a hass avocado? (I have limited garden space)
- Can you hedge a hass avocado?
- Are there dwarf hass avocado plants available? If so, where? (I am in Geelong)
Thanks so much, and thanks for the abundance of information and knowledge everyone has shared so far! :)
-
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Ral
Geelong
27th January 2011 9:50pm
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J says...
Ral,
Hass is a type A avocado and will need a type B near by for good fruit set (Bacon or fuerte varieties for example)

In regards to all your questions about a dwarf hass, it almost sounds like you want a "gwen" variety which has Hass parentage, very similar fruit and is a much smaller tree compared to a hass. My gwen is growing really well and has even flowered within six months of me putting it in the ground. I recommend checking out sheppards nursery in hastings, who have plenty of different varieties (including Gwen).

Maybe our resident avocado (and white sapote :) ) expert Jason could weigh in.
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J
upwey, Melbourne
27th January 2011 10:49pm
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Brendan says...
Ral,
The 'Lamb Hass' is a semi-dwarf, might be what you're after?
Gwen is too.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
28th January 2011 9:28am
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Original Post was last edited: 28th January 2011 9:31am
Jason says...
Ral, you can prune Avocado trees if you have too, I would think that's a better idea in Victoria rather than plant a dwarf since it's always a better idea to have the stronger tree in a marginal climate. If you prune just 1/4 or 1/3 of the tree at a time you will still get fruit on the rest of the tree. Most commercial orchards these days are high density plantings and they cut half the tree (down one row) then do the other side another year.

Gwen will fruit pretty much as soon as you stick it in the ground but it sets so much fruit so easily that you have to spend time thinning the fruit or it just makes it even more of a dwarf tree than it already is. I had to pull about 50 fruit of a 6 foot Gwen tree the other day and it still looks like it's carrying a silly amount of fruit for it's size.

Hass tends to be better at dropping excess fruit by itself. They are similar fruit but Hass is the better fruit than Gwen. If you are only planting one I'd choose the Hass tree for Geelong just to give you a bit of margin for error in getting it to grow strongly at least for a first Avocado tree. Right now my Hass tree is about.... 15 feet x 15 feet I guess and you could keep it at that size with pruning, mine has a Macadamia of that same side beside it that it's recently run into so it will have to grow a bit more upright from now on.

I don't have a Lamb Hass so not sure how that grows but if it's semi-dwarf that could be a good one, I know it has excellent fruit. Another option is Reed which will take up much less room at ground level since it prefers to grow straight up.

I'm not sure how well any of those set fruit without a pollinator since I've always had pollinators but I think they would be OK without one, maybe a bit smaller crop and smaller fruit. Talking about Sapotes I better go and water mine, they don't like this 40c stuff
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Jason
Portland
30th January 2011 8:04pm
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helen says...
I bought my avocado from a nursery in Wandin on the road to Warburton. They had a large variety of avocados but not at this time of year. They sell them in winter and early spring
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helen7
croydon
1st February 2011 10:23pm
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Brendan says...
G'day Jason,
Just wondering if you have a Reed avocado tree? Mine's only been in 2 years, and looks like it's about to flower? Certainly likes the rain!
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
5th February 2011 9:19am
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Jason says...
Brendan, I have two but they are both only small, the larger of them has a couple fruit on it for the first time this year. Be a bit strange for your tree to flower at this time of year? I thought it would be at least a couple months away from starting to push flowers even up there. But its a good variety for sure.

I have a seedling Avocado here, it was actually the first fruit tree I planted in my garden about 11 years ago. I planted it in a really high and dry spot though and it's struggled ever since slowly reaching about 8 feet in height last year. WIth this wet Summer it's just decided to EXPLODE in growth :D. It's done an extra 4 feet all over and showing no signs of wanted to slow down any time soon, really big strong rubbery red new growth all over it. Just goes to show most of the problem with growing things outside the subtropics is not lack of heat but lack of water over Summer.

I'm a big fan of Summers like this now :) I'm really trying to make the most of it because this kind of weather might not happen again in my lifetime so I'm really try to look after everything doubly good this year to get some size into them while I can. I actually decided to stick another Hass tree in today, I would have preferred to put another Reed in but that graft failed :0 since one of the Hass grafts I did is pushing nicely now I'll just plant that
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Jason
Portland
5th February 2011 5:48pm
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Brendan says...
Thanks Jason. Yeah, it could be just new buds on my Reed, and not flowers, so I'll keep an eye on it.
I'm a bit of a Reed fan too, nice fruit and good size :-)
Just read the tag that came with the tree, and it says fruiting age (for Reed) is 2 to 3 years, so I've got fingers crossed.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
6th February 2011 8:13am
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Ral says...
Thanks so much for your advice. I really appreciate it! I will let you know how I go. Thanks, Lorelle :)
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Ral
Geelong
17th February 2011 1:03pm
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Dwain says...
Hi, I just purchased an Avocado Bacon tree and I was just wondering if anyone has grown it successfully in a pot.


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Harry
Melbourne
8th March 2011 11:19pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th March 2011 11:38pm
Jason says...
Dwain, you would need a really large pot that would more or less take up a large part of a backyard. Avocados wont hold many fruit until they have a very large root system
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Jason
Portland
9th March 2011 12:14pm
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Dwain says...
Thanks, for the advice. I'll wait for it to mature a bit before before planting it in the ground. I am hoping it will survive the upcoming winter...fingers crossed.
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Harry
Melbourne
11th March 2011 2:00am
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Jason says...
Dwain, stick it in the ground now, the sooner the better with them. No where in Melbourne should get could enough to damage an Avocado in any way so you don't need to stress about it
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Jason
Portland
11th March 2011 3:00am
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Dany says...
Hi guys
I have a Bacon Avo in a pot - bought from Bunnings. Cannot quite make my mind to plant it in the garden. I am so afraid thet it might die. Canberra gets to -7 degrees frequently. What shoulod I do?
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Dany
Canberra
15th March 2011 4:45pm
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J says...
Is there a type B DWARF variety that would be good for pollinating a gwen in melbourne?
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J
Upwey, Victoria
15th March 2011 7:24pm
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Jason says...
J, I'd leave the Gwen for a couple years to see how you go first. I have a lot of trouble with my Gwen tree over fruiting, I'm forever pulling fruit off it so the tree will still grow. It's only a 6 foot tall stick and sets way more than 100 fruit every year, I have to pull most of them off or it just wont do anything. I'd be much happier if it fruited less or even about the same as Hass which is still maybe a little too heavy and would be more ideal if you thinned some fruit out of it
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Jason
Portland
15th March 2011 11:25pm
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J says...
Fair enough. I'm tempted to get another gwen and alternate flowering & fruiting between the two every year. (I haven't experienced the whole TOO MUCH avocado scenario yet :) ) since I do have a fuerte and bacon nearby. A quick question about the bacon: in vic, how long should it take for a bacon to flower? I know fuerte can take 6 to 8 years. are bacons faster?
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J
Upwey, Victoria
16th March 2011 9:30am
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Jason says...
Yeah Bacon is a bit faster. Fuerte is more temperature sensitive while flowering too, so it'll only have a good crop when you have some of those warm northerlies during Spring.

Fuerte is a better pollinator and better fruit but Bacon is a more reliable fruiter. For those inside the city there's enough night time heat for Fuerte to be reliable.

Most of the Type A's will set too much fruit at some stage and that sets them into the two year cycle (one year to recover) then another big crop. TOO MUCH avocados will happen at some stage, during one of those rain events in Summer the fruit on my Bacon trees was splitting, so I picked 120? which was most of the remainder of the crop. I couldn't even deal with making them all into pulp and freezing them before I got sick of it so most of them went rotten.

The 8? kilos of pulp I do have frozen hasn't even been touched yet and Hass will be ready to start picking in another month,,,, then more Bacons etc. I doubt I'll ever get on top of it now since every year there's more and more of them
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Jason
Portland
16th March 2011 12:50pm
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J says...
I picked up another gwen & 1 rincon (about a metre and bit tall, healthy looking fellow) from a wholesaler today. They didn't have any good B types, only sharwill which I've read doesn't do well in melbourne and I needed dwarfs due to limited space, so Rincon & gwen it was. They'll be going near my bacon & fuerte this spring. Does anyone know how quickly a rincon will fruit in melbourne? Is it asap like the gwen & a heavy bearer as well?
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J
Upwey, Victoria
20th March 2011 9:13pm
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Original Post was last edited: 20th March 2011 9:22pm
Jason says...
How do you get a Rincon a meter tall? :P is a stick holding it up?. Mines 10 years old and barely more than a meter tall. Granted it's probably 5 meters wide :) but that's just the way it goes with them. In the end it takes up much more room at ground level than a 40 foot tall Reed, so it's kind of dwarf but also not really depending on which way you look at it. I like to think of Rincon as almost a ground cover.

I have a Sharwil that's just starting to do well now after being in the ground for many years doing nothing. It actually set a fruit this year but it since fell or got knocked off. I might get some fruit off it in the next few years but I'm not expecting it to do much
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Jason13
Portland
21st March 2011 3:46pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st March 2011 3:47pm
J says...
There's a stick holding it up! But its healthy looking. Could you give me some more info as to how your rincon performs, the fruit quality (I'm not expecting hass quality, but I've seen you post on cloud forest that it's better than you expected) and how heavy it crops in portland?

I got a second gwen because I want two tree's that are early producers. I'm hoping the rincon is an early producer as well.
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J
Upwey, Victoria
21st March 2011 3:52pm
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Jason says...
Rincon is a little bit resinous tasting but not too bad. It crops very heavily when it's got enough food. Much more fruit per size of the tree than Bacon, but you expect that from all type A trees. It doesn't crop as heavily as Hass or Gwen though but those two are ridiculous.

It's not as good a fruit as Hass or Bacon but good enough for spreading on your toast, it fruits about a month? after Bacon, probably in December/January mayyyybe also February. It's worth growing anyway. I actually had two of them but lost the smaller one in a especially nasty heat wave and dry year. I can probably go outside now that it's stopped raining and have a rough count up of how many fruit are on my 1 meter :P tall Rincon
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Jason
Portland
21st March 2011 6:57pm
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Jason says...
Well there's more than 200 on it now, but by the time they are ripe I would say another 50 or so would have met an untimely end so 150 would be a pretty safe bet to be mature next Summer. I had a quick count up on my Hass tree the other day and got to around 300 alarmingly quickly so I don't know how many fruit are really on that tree but given that it's also got last years "off year" on it there's surely over 400 fruit actually on the tree right now. You can imagine a Hass tree that's at full size wouldn't have much trouble at all doing 1000 fruit since mine it's still fairly small as far as they go.

My Bacon trees tend to do around 100 fruit a year on average each lately. It's not so many but I have 5? of them so it adds up
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Jason
Portland
21st March 2011 7:57pm
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Original Post was last edited: 21st March 2011 8:03pm
J says...
Does the rincon bare fruit at young age like the gwen? or is there a wait period like the fuerte? If I can get 150 fruit off my rincon, I'll be very happy.

And based on how you stated that it's a low spreading tree, I was initially going to plant in an area that had a 2.5 X 2.5 meter spread, but I've realised I would be crowding the bacon & fuerte if it grew any bigger than that(or they would be crowding the rincon) so I've decided to cut a crappy non fruit tree back and plant it near that. Thanks for this info, Jason. You're a life saver.
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J
Upwey, Victoria
21st March 2011 9:06pm
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Jason says...
You should be able to plant the Rincon near a stone fruit tree which has deeper roots, they wont be on the same level under the ground and wont compete with each other. The other tree will just come up from within the Rincons foliage eventually. You can usually get away with planting stuff very close to each other if they aren't the same type of tree. I stepped out my Rincon tree btw and it was about 5 meters across and maybe slightly over 1 meter tall, that's 11 years old.

The only other Avocado I have that's as wide as the Rincon is Hass but it also grows upwards. Rincon fruits fairly young, within 3 years anyway, but they all need to get a certain size before they are happy about fruiting. If you can get your head around it, try to pull most of the fruit off them for the first few years so you get the maximum growth as fast as possible. It's tempting to go WHAOOOOO I got 3 fruit, but if those 3 fruit are going to set you back a year from getting 100 well... better off to buy those 3 fruit from the shop. Sometimes it's hard to be logical with these things though.

Since you have limited room, you should try and train your Rincon up a bit higher than it will naturally want to grow, if you can stake it up until it's 2 meters? then once it hardens up at that height, let it grow sideways after that. I think it will better use your space. then 2 meters x 2.5 is enough tree mass to have the same fruit as mine does with 1 meter x 5 meters :)
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Jason
Portland
21st March 2011 10:14pm
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J says...
I know, I know, I should be more patient and I generally am. I've been very good with my citrus & my gwen that have flowered so far. I plucked off all their flowers and let em grow.

I had a better look at the original site I wanted to plant the rincon & decided it would end up crowding the other avocado trees too much even with training. So the other site about 15 metres away from all my avocado trees will have to do.
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J
Upwey, Victoria
22nd March 2011 10:57am
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Jason says...
J, here's a video of my Hass tree and area around it that I made this morning for your inspiration. You should have something similar in a few more years

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzeIqRzSCII&
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Jason
Portland
22nd March 2011 12:58pm
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Original Post was last edited: 22nd March 2011 12:59pm
J says...
hey jason, thanks for that video. I would have appreciated running commentary too!! :)

at 0:18 of that video you pass a smaller avocado tree loaded with fruit. Was that your gwen? Because While the video was inspirational, I no longer have a hass (my one from daleys passed away a few months ago. One of my only casualties!!)

I also checked out your other videos. The bacon and rincon ones were good viewing. Your rincon is indeed a drooping hedge!! Also checked out your spring garden tour 2010. Nice work, but did you include all your white sapotes in that video? I didnt see/notice a single one!

Incidently through your videos I linked to a video from an american tree nursery that sold avocados. They had the mexicola variety I've read bout thats the most cold tolerant variety there is (that suprise! suprise!! we don't have here in australia). Good stuff.
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J
Upwey, Victoria
23rd March 2011 11:09am
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Jason says...
J, yes I walked past a small Gwen tree in the video, That tree has had more than 3/4 of the fruit stripped off it because it just set too much to grow at all. Idid actually walk past lots of stuff in one the way to the Hass tree, there's several White sapotes and three different species of Papaya I walked past that are in that video + quite a few Cherimoyas and tons of other things all growing together. The tall tree with the straight up trunk is a White sapote and the first thing I under to the left is my Reinecke tree.

The other Spring garden video doesn't go in that "tropical/edible" section at all just the other stuff that's around it, I purposely walked around it since I'm going to make another video with commentary on that section in a few weeks (Autumn video). I've uploaded an old 2003 and 2004 video but haven't made them public on youtube yet and wont until the new one is done. Then I'll put all three of them in one playlist. Since that's my before and after plan :P

I'm going to try and walk in the same places in the new ones to try and show some idea of the changes in 6-8 years. The Rincon and Bacon trees grew pretty good since spring too but I don't think I'll get over there in the new video. I'll just be on the other side with the sapotes and stuff.

Mexicola was actually in Australia at some stage. I've seen it in some old books as a variety that's in Australia but I've never seen anyone that still has it. The only person I know with a purple skinned pure Mexican valley tree is that guy in the ABC garden show that moved from Sydney to Brisbane, he has a seedling one and he was trying to induce it to fruit last year on the show. I could / can / could have easily get seed from those purple fruited trees from relatives in Mexico if it was legal to bring them :S. So we can only blame the governments uselessness and the QLD Commercial growers stopping Victoria and Tasmania growing avocados (trying to stop at least) for that one.

If you ever decide you have room for one and think you want to graft a bit of Hass onto a seedling I'll send you some bits
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Jason
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Original Post was last edited: 23rd March 2011 1:04pm
juanita says...
To all the avoc experts here, how invasive is the avoc roots?Im planning to transfer my potted bacon avoc in the ground soon & the ideal place is near the house w/c is approx 1/2 meter away from the brick wall, facing northeast. On this spot the avoc will be sheltered from strong gusty wind on a very hot day as well as from frost during winter..Pls i need your advice..Tnx in advance.
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10th November 2011 2:04am
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Brendan says...
Hi juanita, I'm no avo expert, but the large roots are fairly invasive, whereas they have lots of small feeder roots close to the surface, under the canopy spread.
As Bacon will grow to 6 metres, IMO it's probably not a good idea.
Someone else might have other ideas.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
10th November 2011 7:30am
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juanita says...
Hi Brendan..Tnx for your advice & i think you're right w/ regards to avoc roots..Have to find another spot for it.
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12th November 2011 1:58am
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Paul W says...
Jason, what type of papaya is that growing in your video? Do they taste any good and if so, where can you get a plant from?
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12th November 2011 10:57pm
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Jason says...
Paul the one you see the fruit on is just a normal Mountain papaya (Carica pubescens) Vasconcellea pubescens Ben sent me the seeds years ago, there's a few (Carica quercifolia) Vasconcellea quercifolia early in the video too.

You can eat both of them although I think it's better to cook the Mountain papaya or it's a bit gut/mouth/tongue dissolving. There's a babaco in the video too.

I added annotations just now so watch it again and it will show you what's in the Video
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Jason
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13th November 2011 4:28am
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Paul W says...
Thanks Jason, they look great.
Has your mac fruited yet? It looks a similar size to my seedling that is about 9 years old and it flowered last year for the first time. I got only about 20 nuts or so, but this year it has heaps of flowers and so I am expecting well over 100 or more. Also, have you managed to get your Reneki white sapote to fruit? Mine is about 5 years old and a reasonable sized tree, but only has minimal flowers and hasnt set any fruit as yet.
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Jason says...
Flowered last year (just two flowers) and got 2 nuts on one of them :p (they are still on the tree by the way, are yours ripe already?), this year no flowers at all. Last Summer was so lacking in heat and sunshine here that a lot of my trees decided not to flower this Spring, pretty much have no action on any Citrus at all either. I never got a single Fig to ripen last Summer and I have a bulk load of Fig trees. My Persimmons never ripened either, I left them on the tree until August until they went rotten and they were still astringent. This Summer is looking much much warmer so I should be on schedule for Macadamia action next year. I have two Mac trees in the 15-20 foot range and one not all that far smaller so sooner or later I'll get a good crop.

I got about 20 fruit off my Rienecke for the first time 2 season ago (11 years old), that was only the second time it's made any flowers, had about 10 flowers this year but no fruit set. It's not a winner fruit wise that variety, doesn't taste so good either but it looks nice.

If you have limited space and aren't in to collecting them you would be better grafting it over to Vista, Vernon or Pike. The ?good? news is that this year looks like will be a huuuuuuuge year for Avocados, I wont be surprised if I break the 1000 fruit mark with all the trees combined for the first time.

This year I also grew for the first time ever a really good tasting Cherimoya (my Fino tree was like 80% of the way towards a perfect Cherimoya) I was very impressed with that tree this year after kind of giving up on being able to grow a truly good Cherimoya here. I put a bulk load of fertilizer on it last year, something helped but I'm not sure what yet
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Jason
Portland
14th November 2011 1:55am
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Original Post was last edited: 14th November 2011 2:05am
Paul W says...
Some of the nuts on the Mac fell off, but the texture seems really immature. Like they arent ready yet, so I guess I just need to wait some more. My satsuma mandarin had a fairly quiet season last year, but this year it's making up for it as there must be hundreds that have set. I had a good season on the Fuyu persimmon last year (I got over 70 fruit off the one tree). Doesn't look like it will produce so many this year though. I am exremely impressed with the flavour and texture of the non astringents. If you eat them just after they are crisp like an apple and just beginning to soften, they are superb! That's disappointing about reneki sapotes. Kind of wish I hadn't bothered now. I have Ortego, Vista and Chris already although the Chris is small and hasn't fruited yet.
Very impressed with your avocados. This is something I have really struggled with due to my poor hard clay soil and being so dry over the last 10 years or so (except for last year). I have had quite a bit of success grafting then onto seedling rootstocks though this year. So I now have Gwen, rincon,ettinger,hass and reed ready to to go in the ground. I also have a fuerte, bacon and wertz that are starting to shape up but probably still a year or so away from fruiting.
Interesting about your cherimoya comments as I had exactly the same experience. My finno de jette tree is about 8 years or more and the first time it fruited I was dissapointed after reading such great reviews. This year how ever, it was a very different story. The fruit were fantastic. Quite a bit of variation though, but the good ones were incredibly good. Maybe it was just a good season for them rather than the fertilizer?
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14th November 2011 9:41pm
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Jason says...
Maybe it was just the extra rain that helped the Cherimoyas along?. Although the were looking quite sick these last few years with a fair bit of dieback. No such bad health this year though.

I had I guess 1000 mandarins this year from only 4 trees or so so I guess it's not surprising they are taking a rest from flowering now.

I actually found one of the two Macadamia nuts on the ground today, the green husk was split open so I ate it :). It was kind of "fresher" tasting than ones you buy, a bit more water content and smaller but very nice all the same.

Yeah it takes a while to figure out the right conditions for yourself to be successful at grafting Avocados. You can also loose your Avocado graft mojo! as I seemed to last time I tried to graft some most failed. But I did get a very vigorous young Hass tree from my efforts last year and that tree is pretty much certain to go on and make hundreds of a fruit a year at some stage now.

This year is actually looking like being the first good year of fruiting for my oldest Fuerte tree, I'll get a rough fruit count on it in a month or so but right now it looks like lots of flowers have set. Normally it only gives a few fruit but I figured it would come good eventually.

Ettingers still wont fruit but well worth its space as a pollinator and Gwen is a bit too small to outgrow the grazing of the Kangaroos. I only have two small badly shaped Reed trees but it's promising and I will graft myself up a really good one of those one day.

I guess if I have to make my Avocado collection smaller and the most productive I'd have Hass, Reed, Bacon and Fuerte with one Ettinger in the middle as a pollinator.

I guess it was similar for you but the growth I got here last year was just double or triple what I normally get on everything despite being so cool. I've also gone and collected some more Fig trees over the last year, I must have around 10 varieties now. It's a fruit I really like but one that is really borderline with my lack of heat so I need to collect lots of them to find out which ones are winners and which aren't.

But overall things are getting fairly productive now, I can go outside pretty much any time of the year and bring back a jumper full of fruit and that's a good feeling I reckon. Even better that it improves every year.

Vernon is a Sapote well worth having it's season is a little later than Vista and Ortega is more less a pollinator since it only has tiny fruit. Chris doesn't fruit very often at all for me yet but is sublime when it does, no other sapote I've got comes anywhere close in flavour
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Jason
Portland
15th November 2011 2:16am
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Original Post was last edited: 15th November 2011 2:16am
J says...
So Jason, the Reinecke commericial fruit wasn't as good as you hoped? As good as pike?

My two gwen, rincon and small bacon flowered but they have all dropped their flowers. I think they are too small to fruit yet.

Most of my bigger white sapotes are flowering right now including my chris. Should get a decent crop this year.
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
15th November 2011 10:37am
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J says...
has anyone had any luck with getting Pinkerton, shephard & Ettinger varieties to fruit in victoria?
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24th November 2011 2:16pm
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Original Post was last edited: 24th November 2011 2:20pm
Jason says...
I don't know anyone that's tried Pinkerton but I'd bet anything that it would fruit very well in Victoria being a type A Guatemalan tree like Hass and Reed which are both excellent for Victoria. I've always been sure it would be a winner, just never got around to getting one. Shepherd isn't an especially good fruit and is a type B so I wouldn't bother with that one but it might be useful for a few fruit at an odd time of the year. Ettinger generally wont fruit, you get a couple once in a while, but that's it, you still need an Ettinger for it's extreme excellence as a pollinator though.

Reinecke wasn't all that good no, it's ok, the main problem with it is how long it takes to fruit and how few fruit it makes
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Jason
Portland
24th November 2011 3:32pm
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J says...
Thanks Jason. I don't really have enough room for a avocado tree that doesnt fruit and just pollinates, so Ettinger is out. I'll try a pinkerton.
I've got two very large non fruit trees on the border of my property and this winter I'm going to have them removed and I'm going to put more avocados in their spot. It's the only remaining room I have for fruit trees on the property so I'd like to make it count!

I'd like to put a type A & B in one hole each and I have room for 6 trees if I do it like that.
So far I've got 2 gwens, a bacon, fuerte and rincon which are all powering on. The both gwens flowered this year (again) but this time I left the flowers on but they all dropped off, so yep, it looks like I need a Type B to flower at the same time.

Out of the six new avo trees I'd like to get a hass & bacon in one hole, Ryan and reed in another and then a pinkerton/wurtz & zutano in the final hole. Hass, bacon, reed and wurtz are easy to find (Sheppards nursery or sunraisya nursery have them) but I can't seem to find Ryan, pinkerton & zutano in any nurseries/online nurseries. Any recommendations? You could say daleys but daleys avocado trees don't do well where I am. Must be the rootstock.
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
24th November 2011 4:36pm
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Original Post was last edited: 24th November 2011 4:37pm
Jason says...
It's lovely of them to host the forum but I have to say every single Avocado I've bought from Daleys has died sooner or later and just never looked like wanting to live. Pretty sub standard trees when it comes to Avocados, but you can live and learn and improve, so that's just some feedback.

All the successful trees I've got have been commercial grade trees from the Sunraysia area. Bought and planted at the proper age and height (young).

You only need one type B tree really, if you don't want Ettinger the next best thing as a pollinator is it's parent (Fuerte) which will fruit.

If you have 3 holes left plant a single tree properly in each hole. Reed, Pinkerton and a Hass. Give those 3 enough space and you will get several hundred fruit from each one every year. Your better off forgetting about Wurtz and Zutano and Ryan they are no good in comparison, well Ryan is ok but it's so similar to Bacon with less production, you can match the amount of fruit those 3 would make put together over 10 years in one year with Hass. I'd rip the Gwens and Rincon out too and replace them with another Reed another Hass and a Bacon if that was me with limited space. That's just my opinion if you wanted the most production with the best quality fruit you can get. If you just want to collect them for the fun of it then you can get all those smaller weaker trees and type B's but I wouldn't if I was doing it again
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Jason
Portland
24th November 2011 5:14pm
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Original Post was last edited: 24th November 2011 5:15pm
Jason says...
I forgot, if you can get hold of a Lamb Hass, do that. I don't have one but it's something I should have. Just like Hass but a bigger fruit and later, which almost puts it in the same season as something very early like say the crapy tasting Zutano
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Jason
Portland
24th November 2011 5:17pm
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J says...
Hey jason, thanks for the advice again. The aim of planting all the avocado varieties is to get varieties that give me fruit at different times of the year. Doesn't wurtz fruit at a different time from hass, bacon, fuerte etc?
I won't be ripping out the gwens or the rincon because they are perfect for the spot they are in, plus I'm kinda surprised at the advise (RIPE EM OUT!!) because your gwen seems to take a small amount of space and gives you plenty of fruit. Nothing wrong with that.

I think I may go with sunraisya for the hass and reed, but 4 of my trees currently are from Sheppards (hastings) who get their trees from Birdwood. The trees have been doing very well, and I've been to the birdwood site http://www.birdwoodnursery.com.au/avocados/ and they seem to sell pinkerton and Lamb hass so maybe I can get them from Sheppards as well. Sunraisya nurseries will not sell you lamb hass (or even gwen) unless you have an ABN and buy from their retail nursery.
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Upwey, Melbourne
24th November 2011 5:43pm
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Jason says...
My Gwen does only take a small space and sets LOTS of fruit, however it's like a citrus, a real pain in the ass because it sets practically every single flower, so I have to thin the fruit over and over again and even then the tree is so small that it tends to almost kill itself trying to ripen the fruit. Most years I've ended deciding I've left too much fruit on it and end up ripping all the fruit off it so it can get some energy to actually grow, since it ripens with Hass I don't care so much. Right now it's got 100 fruit? and almost no leaves because it's struggling to grow them and I've already thrown 100s of small fruit off the tree months ago.

If you had a small space and willing to thin the fruit to a sensible amount for the tree it would be great but if you compare it to the Hass tree right beside it well you would just want to cut it out and plant a Hass tree, fair enough the Hass tree is 50 times the size and probably takes up half a normal backyard but you don't have to do anything to it except eat it. Avocados are a very nutrient rich fruit and you need a fairly serious sized tree to produce a fruit like that year in year out.

I'll tell you when I get fruit from the "good" trees. Hass is April-early September might even be able to pick them as early as March. Reed is like one month later than Hass. Bacon October-December, might stretch into Jan. Fuerte Dec-Feb. For me that's enough Avocados since in late Summer there's plenty of other fruit. I have a Sharwil tree that did almost nothing for 10 years and these last two years has decided to grow very rapidly so it might flower and fruit next season (might) but it hasn't as of now so I have no opinion on that one yet.

But really Hass and Reed are the ones to mostly have, they ripen in the dead of Winter, both will hang on the tree a long time and both strong growing Guatemalan type A's

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Jason
Portland
24th November 2011 6:26pm
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J says...
My concern with hass in the dandenongs is that it will not perform as good as say a coastal place like yours in Portland. The one person I know that has a hass (and a fuerte) in the dandenongs still hasn't got his hass to fruit after 7 years and its a big tree. He has a fuerte as well that is 8 years old and has given him 30 fruit so far.. not exactly amazing results, but my fuerte is in a good spot along the border and if it pollinates the other type A's and produces 30 avocados a year that's ok by me. A massive tree that takes up a lotta room in my garden & that produces nothing is not so o'k. That's my logic in choosing the gwens over hass's and maybe my logic in choosing a lamb hass over a hass. Unless ofcourse there's someone else up my way that has had resounding success with hass in the hills..
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
24th November 2011 6:45pm
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Jason says...
Well in that case it seems the Hass is too busy growing to be bothered flowering just yet, if conditions are really good for growth they will do that. Or maybe Fuerte isn't pollinating Hass but it should still fruit fairly heavily without a pollinator. I'll bet when it does get into gear it'll smash all previous fruiting records held by his Fuerte tree.

I wouldn't really say my trees are influenced by the coast, they are 3km upwind and 80 meters above the sea. 30km downwind and that keeps the temps cool but other than that they might as well not be anywhere near the sea
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Jason
Portland
24th November 2011 7:21pm
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Roch says...
J,
For Pinkerton, have you tried Forbidden Fruit Nursery-NSW? I got my Pinkerton 2 years ago. It's still in a pot & is struggling. May be the root stock is not suitable for the chilly climate here.
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Roch1
Vic
1st December 2011 1:15pm
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J says...
Roch, I think you might be right. My hass from daleys went in the ground and promptly died, will all the avo's I've gotten from vic dont have a single problem with wet feet or cold. Maybe rootstocks used in NSW don't work that well for VIC climates? Sunraisya nurseries in VIC uses Zutano as its rootstock which is meant to be very cold tolerant. Might call forbidden fruit and find what out what rootstock they use. Thanks Roch.
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J
Upwey, Melbourne
1st December 2011 1:55pm
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Jason says...
J, I've used any seeds I've had laying around and got some very successful trees growing on those random rootstocks none of which are on Zutano.

I don't think rootstocks are the issue. Well unless when Daleys ask for large seeds for rootstock to make grafting faster and easier they get West Indian types, I doubt they would grow well here.

Really it's just the overall condition when you get the plants, they are older, the graft union generally nothing like the quality of the Sunraisya grown trees. Plus you have the ever present problem of the tree being grown so much further North that it has to go through the whole cycle of having the leaves burnt off and regrowing it's Victorian adapted set of leaves.

Roch Avocado's are very hard to keep healthy in a pot, you get much better success planting on the day you get them
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Jason
Portland
1st December 2011 2:33pm
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Brad says...
jason you don't want to come across to WA and graft an avo for me... damn it, 2 attempts failed on the seedling that was in our vegie patch.
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Brad2
G Hill, Perth
2nd December 2011 6:40pm
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Jantina says...
Hooray there are some baby avos on one of my Reeds, only planted last year. It's only 3 ft tall so will have to take nearly all of them off (they might drop off by themselves yet) but this is the first fruit I've had set so I'm happy.
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
2nd December 2011 7:44pm
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Jason says...
Brad if I ever cross the desert I'll give it a go :), you just keep trying you will get there in the end. So long as the temp is around 20c most of the time and the scion doesn't dry out AND has swollen buds you have a pretty good shot. That reminds me Jantina, any signs of life or death on those sapote grafts?. I'll go look at mine now. Also well done on the Reed avocados :) you should get some more Reeds for sure
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Jason
Portland
2nd December 2011 8:06pm
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Jantina says...
Just had a look at them Jason, they are nice and green with little buds, should we take off the tape now?
We have 3 Reeds in and more in pots we got from Sunraysia, do you want me to put your name on the best one?
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
3rd December 2011 9:52am
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Jason says...
The ones with parafilm wont need to be unwrapped until there's like a foot of growth on the scion. Those ones up the top part of the garden where I grafted the whole tree with pike those don't have parafilm so once the buds start to swell under the tape on those ones just do a little razor slice beside the bud to open the tape so the bud can get out. The parafilm ones will break out by themselves. The Rainbows I did here are still green and good, no bud swell yet but I think they will be winners too.

I bet if you can find the graft I did on the tree furthest to the west in the bottom section of the garden with the un named Jason seedling. That will be broken out of the parafilm by now since it had buds ready to go when I grafted it
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Jason
Portland
3rd December 2011 1:59pm
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Jantina says...
Had a look yesterday Jason (been away for a couple of days)and yes one has broken through the parafilm. Also one broken through on the big flowering sapote. The rest are loking green and healthy
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Jantina
Mt Gambier
6th December 2011 11:22am
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Jason says...
Horay for parafilm :)
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Jason
Portland
6th December 2011 4:40pm
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Jason says...
I've got one bud of Rainbow out of the parafilm, so that one at least is looking good
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Jason
Portland
10th December 2011 7:22pm
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ces says...
Hi, I've just been to bunnings this weekend and saw lots of avocado plants (hass, bacon, reed, etc). The guy there told they are self-pollinating, is this info correct? By the way I'm in Melbourne
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66
 
11th March 2012 7:33pm
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Jason says...
Yes self pollinating but they perform better with the second tree with the opposite flower type. In Melbourne if you only have one space I would get Reed or Hass. Reed has perhaps the best flavour being slightly poached eggy?, Hass tastes like well how it does in the supermarket but a little better when home grown
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Jason
Portland
13th March 2012 11:19pm
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Oryx says...
Which Bunnings would that be? Looking for a 2nd tree to complement my Hass
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Oryx
Eltham
14th March 2012 9:57am
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ces says...
Thanks Jason, I don't have much space so I think I'll go Hass. The bunnings I went to is in Box Hill
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66
 
14th March 2012 9:05pm
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Chris says...
Doesn't the Hass grow into a rather large spreading tree?
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Chris
Sydney
14th March 2012 9:51pm
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Oryx says...
Thanks ces. Will check that out
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Eltham
15th March 2012 8:01am
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Grubs says...
Putting in my Avos from Daleys now before it gets too cold. I got a Hass and Fuerte 2 weeks ago and ordered a Bacon and Reed this week (all from Daleys - oh the freight!)

..I've ripped the ground, and added a little horse poop around them...but is there anything special to do given that planting just before winter seems (to me) like the wrong thing to do. I'd been waiting for 6-9 months for Daleys to have stock so got them now while I could (didnt think to look at the local Bunnings!). Will they need plastic guards to get through the first winter... or just leave them and go with the flow?
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Grubs
Melbourne
16th March 2012 2:02pm
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Original Post was last edited: 16th March 2012 2:03pm
Brendan says...
Up here Grubs, we plant avos on a mound, and never dig a big hole to plant them in, it forms a well and the the tree ususlly dies from being overwet.
The mounds I use are just soil, old cow manure and a fair bit of Gypsum, covered with a coarse mulch, and NO fertilizer. Could be different down there?
Jason down your way will know.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
17th March 2012 9:50am
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j says...
Grubs, based on my experience with the one hass tree I got from daleys, I'd say you'd be better of planting it in spring. Keep in mind I did that and the daleys hass still carked it. Haven't had single problem with any my locally bought avocados such as Gwen, Bacon, Fuerte and Rincon. Jason has had similar bad luck with daleys avocado trees as well, so maybe take extra care of it.
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J
 
17th March 2012 10:02pm
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Jason says...
I put mine straight in the ground with a minimally dug hole. Once they are planted I give them fairly heavy doses of fertilizer and good mulch to inspire them to grow straight away and strongly. The first couple of years are the most important, if you get strong growth then, then you will have a good long term Avocado tree.

On the other hand I've never had an Avocado from Daleys survive long term, all the good trees that I haven't grown myself came from Sunraysia nurseries. That doesn't mean Daleys aren't growing good trees at the moment, just that they weren't real flash during the time I was starting out with my fruit growing. If you have a good tree you can plant it any time, a lot/most of mine were planted in Autumn, the quicker you get them out of the pot the better, same day you buy the tree if possible
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Jason
Portland
18th March 2012 11:44pm
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Brendan says...
Another tip I do grubs is when making the mound (or digging the hole), I sit the avo tree in a bucket of water with a glug of seasol.
The reason for this is to wet the root ball and give the roots a feed, because if they're planted with a dry root ball, it's VERY hard to wet after it's planted.
Agree with Jason, plant 'em asap.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
19th March 2012 9:24am
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Grubs says...
Thanks all. I like a challenge and it sounds like I'm starting in the right direction.

The plants arrived from Daleys in perfect condition with nice wet root balls (pots enclosed in plastic) and I was there on delivery day to unwrap and water them. 2 days in the carport with daily water and weather that was rainy anyhow so they didn't dry out. Planting spot is a slight slope near the top of a gentle rise so good drainage (never boggy even in Melbourne Winter). I ripped the ground in a patch then barrowed in a couple of loads of dirt which got mixed with a little horse poop and the local soil to form broad planting mounds. Seasol when planting (and another one since) and an extensive ring of 6 month old tree chipper mulch well clear of the stems. The trees got a very slight droop on planting day but have straightened up and looking good.

The soil here is fairly shallow unfortunately - 30-50cm and then clay underneath. Nothing like the 2m mentioned here: http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/AvocadoMaintenanceSchedule.htm

*sigh* ...now I'm thinking I might empty a compost bin and raise them up a bit further before the roots get established.

The Bacon and Reed are on the truck now so I'll start mounding soil!

Edit: I'll splash some gypsum around too.
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Grubs
Melbourne
20th March 2012 10:58am
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lockey says...
Hello all I bought a bacon avocadoe tree from Aumann's nursery in Warrandyte about 1.5 years ago. It was about 4 ft high in pot now it is 6 ft with many more branches that are flowering. Nursery man advised it was self polinating- time will tell
I planted it in well drained soil where a Conifer tree once grew. It has been protected by northern winds with a piece of shade cloth as this has helped with frost also. It has so far withstood this years very cold winter and grew lots during last years tropical feeling summer.
I have fertilised it every 4 months with citrus food and blood and bone. Looks like it will last through this winter with a few frost burn't leaves but otherwise so far so good.
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lockey
croydon
26th August 2012 11:15am
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lockey says...
If anyone has doubt that avacadoes trees cannot grow in Melbourne please persist.
What got me to grow mine was seeing a 12 ft tall Avacadoe tree growing in a backyard in the suburb of Reservoir.
It had to much fruit to count and the kids were ripping them off to play backyard cricket.
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lockey
croydon
5th September 2012 7:30pm
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Brendan says...
Can you post a photo lockey? :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
6th September 2012 8:56am
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Dana says...
I've been growing an avocado sapling from seed indoors and it was doing very well for the past two months, it's 2.5 feet tall. But now all of the leaves are browning one by one and I have tried everything that I've read online to try and prevent the loss of all its leaves. Now it only has three leaves left and two of them are beginning to brown. Does anyone have any idea what this problem is and how I can save my plant? I can't seem to get a conclusive answer about this.
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Dana4
New York
13th October 2012 2:41am
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Brendan says...
Hi Dana, first of all, there's really no such thing as an indoor plant, they must have sun.
Avocados don't like wet feet either, is the soil too wet?
If it were mine, I'd move it outside, give it a tbsp each of P & K fertilizer, and a tbsp of gypsum. Only just water that in and see what happens. Good luck.
Someone else on this forum will be able to help too.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
13th October 2012 8:47am
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lockey says...
Here you go Brendon pics of my Bacon avacadoe. Now flowering hopefully it gives us lots of fruit! I live in Croydon and if you look on youtube there's a video of large trees growing in the southern vic http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHOrR0OE6eE vid of hass tree http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRCBchxz0yQ&feature=relmfu
There's another vid of trees in the dandenongs amongst other varieties of tropical trees but i cant find it for now
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lockey
croydon
14th October 2012 9:51am
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Original Post was last edited: 14th October 2012 10:57am
Brendan says...
Good pics lockey. Gee it seems a young tree to have that many flowers, hope you get lots of fruit.

That 'leaf-tip-burn' in pic 2, could be salt burn problem, gypsum would help with that, or it's lacking phosphorus fertilizer.
I'd leave it for the moment, as it could upset the flowering, gypsum won't hurt now tho. Good luck.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
15th October 2012 8:09am
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lockey says...
Cheers thanks for advice. I will hopefully post pics of fruit if mother nature smiles upon me : )
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lockey
croydon
15th October 2012 4:42pm
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lockey says...
To anyone interested, out of the thousands of flowers that have grown 99% have fallen off. Just 3 have turned to immature avacadoe and hopefully will survive the through summer. Looks like the tree put most of its energy into flowering and once they had fallen replace then with leaves.
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lockey
croydon
23rd November 2012 6:56pm
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Brendan says...
Up here lockey, we have to spray for Anthracnose, it's one of the main culprits for falling fruit. Deficiencies of zinc & boron help fruit drop as well :-)

I had 2000 fruit set on my trees, after the very strong winds we had recently, I'm down to about 500! Grrr! :-(

Yours should do better next year :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
24th November 2012 8:45am
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VF says...
Oh Brendan, if only I had 500! I started with about 50, the strong winds knocked about 40 off, and then the other night some critter taste tested ALL the remaining fruit. Result = 0 Do possums eat them, bushrats? My trees are about 10m from virgin forest. Nets up next year - live and learn.
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VF
Wongawallan
24th November 2012 9:52am
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Brendan says...
Yeah VF, possums and flying foxes love them. Most of my avo trees have green-ant nests, so that helps a bit.
Spraying for anthracnose with copper oxychloride with a decent wetter helps too, not many pests like eating copper oxy.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
26th November 2012 8:57am
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VF says...
Thanks for the tip Brendan. Odd thing though, whatever the critter was, it passed up ripening Pawpaws to eat the hard green Avo's - go figure? Must be more af a 'savoury' lover :)
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VF
Wongawallan
27th November 2012 10:51am
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PurpleAvocado says...
I have grown a Shepherd avocado from a pit and at +25cm above the pit in the pot it needs to go in the ground. My question is do I plant it in the ground with the top of the pit showing? My feeling is YES otherwise the roots may rot. Also I have been advised to have a "morning female / arvo male and vice versa" = is this correct and if so, how do I go about it?

Cheers jill
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PurpleAvocado
 
20th March 2013 9:52pm
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Jason says...
Jill, yes the seed naturally grows with its tip out if the soil. As for the a/b flower types you would need to wait for your tree to flower to find out what it is. Might take 5 years, might take 30. You never know.
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Jason
Portland
20th March 2013 11:02pm
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Brendan says...
G'day Jason & Jill, check out my method here: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_determine_type_'A'_or_type_'B'_avocado_trees

I know it sounds like voodoo, but it does work :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
28th March 2013 8:29am
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blueinca99 says...
I notice a lot of people talk about the A & B types & it's a way of making sure you get a decent harvest rather than replying on self-pollinating solely. But I would've thought it is a little more complicated than merely marrying up an A with a B etc, surely specific types of each need to be paired, because surely for cross-pollination to occur it must occur at a time when both 'types' open their flowers???

Also I thought the Sunraysia nursery didn't 'send' avocado trees?
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blueinca99
Mentone
1st April 2013 3:06pm
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Jason says...
Its too cold in most of Southern Victoria for most type B's to be pollinated at night anyway so your main croppers if you want any decent amount of fruit has to be type As and then any old type B will do since it's male in the day time and the temps are good enough.

Also Ettinger is a bit deformed and flowers as a male a couple times for each time it's female or something like that, that's why it's the best pollinator. All you need for perfection if you have room is a Hass tree a Reed tree and a Ettinger. Hass and Reed are both easy to find but if you cant find an Ettinger then you get a Fuerte or a Bacon for a pollinator.
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Jason
Portland
2nd April 2013 2:05am
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blueinca99 says...
the Ettinger is an interesting one, it's almost impossible to find for retail availablity, maybe one may find one at a market - maybe. Even Sunraysia doesn't appear to it on their list....
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blueinca99
Mentone
2nd April 2013 12:52pm
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Jason says...
I have two Ettinger trees, but its not really viable for me to be spending a couple years growing trees and grafting them. Still if anyone wants to spend the time to graft one for themselves in spring the wood is there.
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Jason
Portland
2nd April 2013 6:47pm
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Anonymous says...
Hello, I bought a Hass avocado tree back in autumn but I haven't been able to plant it. Would it be ok to plant it in the ground now that we are in spring? By the way I'm in Melbourne
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66
 
31st August 2013 11:13am
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Jason says...
Yes, the sooner the better. Autumn is ideal but today is always better than tomorrow when it comes to getting out of a pot into the real ground
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Jason
Portland
31st August 2013 12:13pm
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Anonymous says...
Thanks, I'll do it
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66
 
31st August 2013 1:54pm
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Deanna says...
Hi everyone, I've read most posts on this page, probably for 2 hours :D because I want to learn how to take care of my avocado and most of you seem to know about that a lot.
I don't live in Vic, I live in SA, actually in Adelaide.

I planted my avocado tree from a seed just for the sake of the experiment - I had bought some avocados and they were very yummy but 2 had the bone inside cracked and a shy seedling was already coming out...
I felt sorry to just kill it chucking it in the compost, so I planted them in the garden to see what happens. One came out, the other never did. I mean it did but spotted with black already and weak and I did not try to save it because would have been a very unhealthy tree, I assumed.

That was in 2004.

My healthy tree grew and grew - I did a bit of research and learned that i needed to wait 7-10 years for the fruit. Other than that, the tree took care of itself pretty well without much help.
When was too hot, I watered it a and that was that. It's rooted amongst flowers so it got some fertilizer together with the flowers occasionally.

This autumn I'll have to prune the top, it's too tall and I've pruned it only once, about 3 years ago, it was no need for pruning except for the height, other than that the tree looks pretty well balanced and symmetrical.

In 2011 it flowered timidly for the first time, and hardly had enough flowers for us to see how they looked like and all of them dropped - I did expect that in a way, it was the beginning, no miracles expected...But one day we noticed 2 fruit!!!! despite the odds - just enough for us to see what type of fruit it will bear, and how it'll taste.(Yummy)
I was very glad it had 2 fruit - I waited 7 years to see that.
In May 2012 we picked the two, could not wait them to drop :)
Could anyone tell me what type of avocado is it, please?
I have no idea - but I think is Haas - is it not?
I know it is exactly what I put in the ground all those years ago - but is this what you call Haas? Because I don't know much about types of avocados...don't laugh at me...
I have some flowers in the garden that I don't know what they are called but I know instinctively how to take care of them in general :)
Usually nothing really dies in my hands - perhaps they know I love them even when I don't know their names LOL!

As we speak, my avocado has one million flowers - I hope we'll have about 30 fruit this year if we are lucky...I mean next year in May.
It's the only avocado I have but if it self pollinated last time when it had maybe 70-100 flowers only, do you think it will self pollinate now more seriously?
There are some bizarre little bees on it, hundreds of them, they seem like native wild bees but I hope they are doing what they are supposed to do.
Ah, one more thing - the flowers close overnight - does this help on identifying its kind better?
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Deanna
 
10th October 2013 1:34am
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Brendan says...
Hi Deanna, nice looking avo, don't think it would be a Hass. If you plant a seed from a shop bought Hass, you won't get a true Hass, but a cross breed.
Can you post a photo of it cut in half, after it ripens? I'm interested in the size of the seed.
Pic 3 reminds me of a Lamb Hass btw.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
10th October 2013 7:54am
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vlct says...
Is that right it won't be true too type because of x nomination on the farm.
Hi deanne. What position in your yard is your tree planted.. it's not affected by the scorching afternoon summer sun ?
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glenelg
10th October 2013 8:06am
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vlct says...
*poliantion
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glenelg
10th October 2013 8:07am
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Brendan says...
Hi vict, the seed from the shop bought Hass has two 'parents', one is Hass (budwood/scion) the other is the root stock. Hope that helps.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
10th October 2013 8:14am
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Jason says...
Hi Deanna, it does look like its closely related to Has so I'd guess Hass was either the sole parent or one of two. Most seedlings from store bought hass will be self pollinated.

The only problem with self pollination is the offspring can be weaker or infertile just the same as other life forms. Your tree sounds very strong so all is good. I'm surprised it ripens as early as May?. And I think its probably not fully mature by that time. If you do get a lot of fruit this year, leave a few on the tree to see how long they will hang on the tree before they drop. You'll need to know that to see how long you have to eat the crop when you make 500 in a year one day. Also Avocado's are fully ripe when the seed coat can easily peel(fall off) the seed. Sometimes people don't know that and eat them too early. This happens just before the seeds opens and the root starts growing. That's the point when they have really been on the tree too long. Often the roots will actually just break through the fruits skin just before the fruit naturally drops and they hit the ground growing. Hope that's some useful info for you and congratulations. The avocado industry don't encourage people to grow seedlings and spread all kinds of rumours but most people do have success and your keeping the gene pool alive so well done :).
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Jason
Portland
10th October 2013 11:26pm
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gimme says...
I noticed the plant shop has some cold climate avocadoes in stock for $70 that some people are chasing.

I thought I would also share this picture of a Pinkerton avocado fruiting in an 8 inch pot! 6 months from grafting in Brisbane.
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gimme
Brisbane, Qld
9th November 2013 12:44pm
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Original Post was last edited: 9th November 2013 3:23pm
Deanna says...
Thank you Brandon, all I can tell you is the fruit were large, same size like in the stores, but the stone inside was very small, offering us plenty of thick flesh around that seed. It was actually much smaller that the one I planted which was huge compared to the two pieces of fruit we had that first year. For reference, the size (I can tell you because I was so surprised to see how small it was) was like a big cherry and as round as a cherry, not oval like the originally planted one
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Deanna
 
12th November 2013 4:51pm
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Deanna says...
Thank you Jason for the good advice and info.
You are right, we picked them too early and one of them was ripened only on 75% of its volume, it had a bit of hard slice on one side but the other side and a half was perfectly edible.
Actually I had no idea when to pick them and when I researched the internet, most advice was from the northern hemisphere of the world, as at the time Google did not spit out your forum and of course I might have miscalculated the equivalent season here in South Australia.
When I picked them, they were pretty hard but I kept them in a paper bag for few days until they softened, same way I do with some I buy from the store when they look good, but not fully ripened.
However, ours were far more tastier.

My tree lost most flowers this year but still has plenty of tiny fruit, I hope they'll stay on.
They are now a bit bigger than a match-head and on the lower branches are about 30 as we speak but up higher and especially on the sunnier side (towards North) they seem to be even more frequent and a bit larger than on the southern side.
Here are some photos of how they look now, like 30 minutes ago. Sorry for the quality but it's a bit windy and hard to take good pics when the subject moves so much.
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Deanna
 
12th November 2013 7:12pm
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Original Post was last edited: 12th November 2013 7:18pm
Deanna says...
vlct - I gather you are from Adelaide, I see Glenelg there, so be the judge when it comes to heat. In my first post, you can see in pic number 2 a white house, that's my neighbor's house and that direction is towards West, roughly 2 km away from Henley Beach and Henley Square in a straight line.
On the right (North) is a white fence, about 2 m high and between us and the neighbor's house is a 3 m (?) high ivy hedge covering a tennis court high fence (is that normally 3 or 4 m, I have no idea).
In the afternoon that hedge shades part of our yard but not earlier than 2,30 or 3 pm during summer.
So what is your opinion?
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Deanna
 
12th November 2013 7:29pm
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Original Post was last edited: 12th November 2013 7:33pm
Deanna says...
If I may add here, although it's not strictly about avocados, I would encourage anyone to grow trees from seed if they are patient enough.
I have 3 of those.
1 nectarine tree, 1 apricot and the avocado in those pics above.

The nectarine and the apricot came out by themselves from the compost we make and use to fertilize every now and then the flowerbeds, so obviously they were disease and bacteria resistant since they did not rot in the compost.

All I had to do was dig the holes and plant them where I had room for them.

Here's a pic of the nectarine-tree and some of its fruit when it was about 5-6 years old in 2011.
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Deanna
 
12th November 2013 7:45pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Deanna, any chance of getting a couple of seeds of your avos, say if & after you do get a crop? Ta.

I have 10 avo trees, half are seed-grown and half are grafted. Maybe we can swap some seeds of the seed-grown avos if you like? Photo is of a large seed-grown avo, fruit are around 600g each:-) (tree is about 35 years old)

You may want to spray with the spray I mentioned in 'Avocado Growth Rate' above? You may not get Anthracnose where you are, as Jason doesn't seem to get it either? It's rife up here! :-(

Please contact me on: bitquicker at bigpond dot com :-)
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
16th November 2013 9:34am
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Original Post was last edited: 16th November 2013 10:20am
75 says...
Hi I was after some advice as to how long these Gwen Avocados have to go until they are ripe? I am in Southern Victoria in the hills and they must be at least 14 months old now. I have been growing different Varieties for years but this is the first tree that looks like it will crop well for me. I know Jason is growing them down here but not sure about others.
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sean
CARRAJUNG,3844,VIC
7th January 2014 8:30pm
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Jason says...
Hey my Gwen has fruit on it about that same size. I'm not exactly sure when they ripen either, I've eating one or two last year but probably picked them a bit early. I'm guessing they ripen roughly the same time a Hass and that wont be until after easter at the earliest and you can continue to pick them into July.

Do you have Hass and Reed?. Hass, Reed and Gwen all set a lot of fruit for me (really it's only those three which are capable of bulk fruit set here(of the varieties of tried)) but Gwen is a much less aggressive and small tree so although it sets 100's of fruit it has not chance to actually mature many fruit just because the tree is small. It's very mismatched in that way. Hass and Reed are also setting lots of fruit the difference is they are strong enough trees to mature all the fruit they set, even if it does slow them up the following year.
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Jason
Portland
7th January 2014 10:40pm
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75 says...
Hi Jason
It's Sean here, I have very a big Ettinger tree that has only ever set a couple of fruit,a Rincon that is heathy and about 10 years old but has never set a fruit. My Bacon looks a bit more promising and set a couple of fruit last year (6 years old)and seems to have set a fair few again. All Avocados seem to grow well here but getting them to set fruit is the problem.
Also I know everyone says that Gwen is stunty but mines a boomer about 15 feet tall and very vigorous.
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sean
CARRAJUNG,3844,VIC
8th January 2014 1:46pm
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Jason says...
Ps Sean is your Lucuma fruiting yet?
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Jason
Portland
8th January 2014 3:16pm
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Jason says...
Wow my Gwen is lucky to be 6 foot, I have a Ryan beside it which is exactly the same age and its more like 15 feet++.

My Gwen practically sets all its flowers so I'm forever pulling fruit off it so it doesn't kill itself.

The Ryan on the other hand only sets a couple fruit a year like most the type Bs.

Ive have had up to maybe 100 fruit on a Bacon tree before but typically they only have 20-50 fruit each per year.

My Hass trees power along and have practicall unlimited fruit (many hundreds). Reed is proving to be just as good as Hass.

I have two large Ettinger trees which both only have one or two fruit a year, sometimes none. But I put down the success of Hass and Reed partly to those Ettinger trees. I get just a few fruit from Fuerte also. I must be so very close to warm enough for Fuerte to crop better because there are trees as near as Mount Gambier cropping big. Mount Gambier is still not as warm as inside Melbourne but a couple degrees warmer than me.

So there'd some failures and some success but if I were planting them all from scratch again I'd plant probably two Bacon trees, two Hass, two Reed, one Fuerte (accounting for climate change Lol) and one Ettinger in the middle.

If I could only have one tree I'd go for either Hass or Reed, 100% for sure because they are the real deal. Just a pity they both crop in Winter. I don't know of an Avocado that's Mexican, type A and early unfortunately, well apart from Rincon which is mid season but tastes pretty rubbish. (It does crop pretty solidly for me). I'm sure theres a seedling around here somewhere that's suitable, just a matter of finding it. Jantina knows of a good seedling in Mount Gambier but I don't know what time of year it crops. I'm hoping one of my seedlings proves to be an early type A.




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Jason
Portland
8th January 2014 3:20pm
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Original Post was last edited: 8th January 2014 3:20pm
75 says...
No luck with the Lucuma yet, it has a couple of flowers but I don't think they will set. My brother has one though that is covered in flowers this year for the first time so we will see how it goes.

I will have to get myself a Hass I think, they sound bullet proof. When do your Bacons ripen? I have a couple of fruit on it too but I am also not sure when to pick them.

My brother managed to graft quit a few plants from a seedling tree around here that is fruiting well, but to tell the truth I am not exactly sure when its fruit ripens.
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sean
CARRAJUNG,3844,VIC
8th January 2014 10:42pm
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Original Post was last edited: 10th January 2014 11:06pm
Jason says...
Bacon ripens in November. I can pick them until late December but by now they have grown roots into the fruit and have mostly dropped off. Theres a few small later set fruit which I can pick until January. I'd challenge you to grow a Hass and not get a lot of fruit, may as well, you already have the Ettinger. Have you tasted Reed?. It's the king as far as eating quality goes.
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Jason
Portland
9th January 2014 1:36pm
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75 says...
ok I will probably have to pick them soon then, I am probably the same Latitude as you but I am about 600 meters up. Normally on any given day we are abou 4 degrees colder than 10 minutes drive away down the valley, so it always puts me a few weeks behind everyone else. My flowers from this year have only just set and are about the size of a grape seed.
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sean
CARRAJUNG,3844,VIC
10th January 2014 8:14am
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Jason says...
We live about 15km North of my garden, it was 36c here today. 23c at the bom station near the garden. Big difference in heat and that's fairly normal whenever the wind is not directly from the North. Unfortunately I'll be on just the right angle tomorrow. 39c in the garden and 43c here. Problem with having a garden moderated by the ocean like that is when its not and nothing ever gets used to the extreme swings in temp.

I'll be there all day watering tomorrow to try and limit the damage but I'll get leaf burn for sure.

Point of the story is that your altitude probably cools you down a similar amount, maybe more but the ripening times should be similar.
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Jason
Portland
14th January 2014 12:04am
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Thithi says...
Hi Jason and everyone else,
I already have bacon and wurtz avocados, which based on Jason experiences it fruit can be havest in Oct, Nov,Dec.
Wurtz season is May, June, July,Aug,Sep according to FABAL

My aim is to have a supply of Avos all year round. Can you advise which avocado that I should grow so that I can harvest its mature fruits in jan, feb, march and April? Thanhs
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Thithi
Deer park
1st September 2014 5:44pm
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Thithi says...
Hi Jason and everyone else,
I already have bacon and wurtz avocados, which based on Jason experiences it fruit can be havested in Oct, Nov,Dec.
Wurtz season is May, June, July,Aug,Sep according to FABAL

My aim is to have a supply of Avos all year round. Can you advise which avocado that I should grow so that I can harvest its mature fruits in jan, feb, march and April? Thanhs
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Thithi
Deer park
1st September 2014 5:57pm
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Original Post was last edited: 1st September 2014 5:57pm
Jason says...
Hass goes from March to July here it maybe two months earlier at both ends in Melbourne based on what Mark is saying about ripening times in the city. Pretty sure Hass will be the right one to fill that gap.
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Jason
Portland
2nd September 2014 1:47am
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Markmelb says...
Jason - Thithi - took a pic here of my two grafted Avos that worked out of six - Lamb Hass on left - Reed on right and powering along :)
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Markmelb
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2nd September 2014 9:30am
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Thithi says...
Mark, great job well done.
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Thithi
Deer park
3rd September 2014 7:20pm
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Thithi says...
Thanks Jason, Hass could be an excellent choice except it is too tall. What about a lamb hass, would it fruit be mature around jan-april?
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Thithi
Deer park
3rd September 2014 7:25pm
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Jason says...
Lamb Hass is a couple weeks later than Hass I think?.

Hass isn't a tall tree, it's a round shape, considerably shorter than Bacon, but wider!. :). Reed is taller than Hass.
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Jason
Portland
3rd September 2014 8:51pm
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Thithi says...
I did not realize that reed is taller. Hass tree on Daley video is enormous. At the moment I lean toward lamb hass because it is upright. Hm, where could I buy a lamb hass tree?
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Thithi
Deer park
4th September 2014 5:41pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Hi guys I live in the North/West suburbs of Melbourne (Keilor)
We planted two Avocado trees 3 years ago, I planted a Hass variety and also a Fuerte but we planted them only 1 meter apart unfortunately.

The Fuerte is not doing well at all, lucky if it has 8 leaves however my Hass is doing extremely well and for the first time today we noticed it is full of baby avocado's the size of match heads.

I would like to know what fertilizer is the best for Avocado's, I keep reading a fertilizer with a NPK ratio of 7-4-2 is best but I cannot seem to find one.
In the past we have been giving it a little potash, gypsum and organic fertilizer only because I read that on some Australian site which seems to be working, although I think it could do with a little more Nitrogen as it has a few brown leaves but I could be wrong.

I am hoping to continue to do everything right by it as I LOVE avocado's as they play a vital role in my diet due to my high disability.

If I can I will post a few photo's on here.
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Wheels1974
Melb
20th November 2014 11:07pm
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Wheels1974 says...
I'm trying to upload a photo of my Hass Avocado tree, we planted it 3 years ago and it appears to have baby Avocado's but im not 100% sure if they are or not.

My query is are they baby Avocado's and if so how long will they take before they are ready to harvest?

Lastly should I be feeding it a specific type of fertilizer?

Advice very much appreciated.
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Wheels1974
Melb
21st November 2014 1:51pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Here are a couple more photo's of my Hass Avocado.

One of the photo's shows the whole Hass tree and to the right you can see the Fuerte which has no leaves.

The second photo shows what I think are more baby Avocado's.
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Wheels1974
Melb
22nd November 2014 2:28pm
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Markmelb says...
The Hass looks great - sometimes you get an avocado on a crappy seed rootstock and nothing you do will make it better - sometimes its better to pot up the bad one and replace it.
What soil are you on there - the river soil or clay?
Suggest you try a bacon - as the fuerte gets mighty big - I have one at my old place in Richmond about 8mt x 7mt - Big and spreading never gets looked after anymore.
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Markmelb
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22nd November 2014 2:39pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Cheers mate, I was quite surprised to see it had fruit already.
I actually purchased that Hass from my local Bunnings store 3 years ago although my father swears its only been planted for 2 years.

Yeah I want to get a Bacon and also a Sheppard. My house is on a half acre and I also own another half acre block next door which is vacant and I never want to build on it, so I might just go crazy and plant a variety of Avocado trees on the block next door.
I can defiantly put one other plant on my house block actually its been prepared since winter, its about 3 or 4 meters to the right of my Hass tree so I think I will plant the Bacon there because the Bacon variety grows more up right rather then spreading wide.

The soil here is clay mate.
That is why we dug a big hole about 1.5 meter in diameter and about 2 feet deep, we then added a couple of buckets of gypsum in the hole and purchased the best potting mix I could find along with excellent quality soil, mixed it up and back filled the hole before planting the Avocado tree, you can probably see we also raised the area at least 45cm that way it will be able to drain properly, one thing is for certain the Avocado trees root system will never reach the clay from what I read because they are a shallow rooted tree, even a 20 year old tree they say 80% of its root system wont go below 30 cm.

I'm not sure if I should fertilize it, we did fertilize at the very start of Spring (3 months ago)
Using excellent quality organic fertilizer, a little potash and a sprinkle of gypsum.
I might just give it a light dusting of fertilizer and a little manure.

I found this website although its predominately aimed for growing Avocado's in the sub tropics but it has a couple of little handy hints.

It's worth a quick read, got nothing to lose. Here is the link:

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1939805.htm
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Wheels1974
Melb
23rd November 2014 9:06pm
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Markmelb says...
Plant windbreak trees for the Northwest and South west killer winds as Avos hate winds (dont mind shade either)esp on the plains out your way and get youself a Birdwood Wurtz even just for tag as is great tips on it - using Gyspsum is perfect as they love it - and a teasppon of Zinc sulphate every 2 years - well done on your mound too but dont know why the Fuerte didnt like it but may be a dud rootstock like i said before
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23rd November 2014 10:30pm
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jason says...
Very interest year for fruit set on the Avocados. I've got unbelievable amounts of fruit set on some trees which normally don't set much or any at all. Tons of fruit set on Fuerte and a son of Fuerte (Ettinger). Not sure if its because its been so dry or warm or what. But never seen this before. Same thing with white sapotes this year. I'll need to thin them out a lot.
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Jason
portland
24th November 2014 6:40pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Even though im pretty sure they are.
Can someone here confirm whether or not these are actual baby Avocado's on my Avocado Hass tree please.
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Wheels1974
Melb
24th November 2014 11:05pm
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Markmelb says...
They are - but you have to wait and see if they hold - they can still fall off even when 3/4 full size - so its a wait - hope and see game - in a young Avo in Melb if you get one or two your very lucky anyway :)
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24th November 2014 11:12pm
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Linton says...
Hi Mark

Not sure if you saw this pic on the site. It's the Calypso avocado fruit from innovative hort. - for temperate and tropical growing variety. All of my trees are growing steadily with new foliage being produced constantly atm, but the Schullers are much stronger plants than the Calypso.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
20th February 2015 2:10pm
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Original Post was last edited: 20th February 2015 2:07pm
Wheels1974 says...
Mark your spot on mate. Out of those hundred plus match head sized baby avocado's that were growing in November,
I have about 10 Avocado's on my HASS tree they are about the size of a lemon, when will I know when they are ready to pick?

Mark last year you told me and I quote:
"get yourself a Birdwood Wurtz even just for tag as is great tips on it"
End quote.

I have a large totally enclosed pergola, so when we walk out the kitchen Family area, you then enter the pergola.
It has three large sliding doors and on the ceiling it has several clear perspex domes, it's beautiful in winter and spring but unbearable in Summer to the point I even put a evaporative cooling system in just for my pergola but on 30+ degrees days the cooler has no effect in there, it ends up like a sauna on hot days.
So you could basically class it as a huge glass house I guess.

I'm just curious would a Wurtz Avocado tree do well in that or not, im guessing it wouldn't because it's fully enclosed so bee's and other insects wouldn't be able to pollinate a fruiting tree.

Above all id really love to know when these HASS avocado's will be ready for picking as we are entering winter shortly?

I have attached a photo of my pergola, this photo was taken outside looking into the pergola so I'm not sure if it gives u a better idea of what I'm trying to describe.

Advice greatly appreciated.
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Wheels1974
Melb
2nd May 2015 7:37pm
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Markmelb says...
yes -- too hot for Avos in summer - Shade is best then at the hottest time of day to afternoon - how is your Fuerte going? My Lamb Hass in ground grew almost a meter - has only 4 Avos on it - but thats ok - for max taste leave your Hass on as long as possible - I was picking Lamb Hass well over a year on tree so be patient - pick one in July and let it ripen and then one each month after that. Remember Avos are over a month or two behind the warmer latitudes to the North.
Pierce with a toothpick after a week or so to guage ripeness.
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Markmelb
MT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
2nd May 2015 8:18pm
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Linton says...
Attention Mark!

Pomsi seeds - need help!

The Pomsi avocado seeds which I put in water like your other avos are finally doing something. The shoot seems to be coming out of the top but I thought that roots would come out of the bottom first. Is this normal or are the seeds perhaps upside down in the water glass?

Thanks.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
11th May 2015 7:54pm
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Linton says...
Pomsi sprouting now!

I still couldn't work out for sure which was the right way up for the seeds when they were in water. So I planted them in pots about a week ago.

Now one of them is sending up shoots from the seed so it looks hopeful.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
22nd May 2015 6:41pm
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Linton says...
Pomsi's still growing slowly but surely!

Looks like the leaves are finally about to open. The two stems are growing out of the one seed.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
13th June 2015 7:55pm
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Ducky says...
Wow, I've never gotten an avocado to start using the toothpick & water method. Mine little ones were or started in potting mix. Good work Linton

However my biggest tree is currently fighting off root rot (possibly). Brown tips and falling leaves but only to the top half of the tree.
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Ducky
Keysborough
13th June 2015 9:05pm
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Markmelb says...
Going well linton for winter - take off the weaker one of the two - not like growing mango polys - had that issue too in past :0
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Markmelb
MT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
13th June 2015 9:41pm
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Linton says...
Think I should wait until the warmer weather in Spring when they will be more vigorous before trying to separate them.

I've only got a couple of seeds that are growing so can't afford to lose even one if I do the wrong thing. Cheers!
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
14th June 2015 7:04pm
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Markmelb says...
Yes I agree Linton - they may be able to be seperated - if a stem is on either side of seed - then you will have more plants to work with :)
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Markmelb
MT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
14th June 2015 8:30pm
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Linton says...
Pomsi Number 2 is now sprouting in water!

The second of the Pomsi seeds has grown a good shoot and a long well developed taproot. Do you think it should be potted now as I have done with the first one?
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
26th June 2015 10:56am
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Linton says...
Pomsi Number 1.

The leaves on the first Pomsi Avocado have opened now. Still trying to decide when to try and divide the 2 stems on this one.
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
1st July 2015 12:07pm
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Linton says...
More Poms!

Last but not least, Pomsi Number 3 is about ready to be put in a pot and the leaves look soon to emerge. This one has multiple roots whereas Pomsi Number 2 only had a single long taproot. Interesting........
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Linton
Springvale, Vic
16th July 2015 8:12pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Hi guys it's me again. I still have 10 Avocado's on my Hass tree which is now starting to flower again.

I have done a ton of research but everything you read seems to contradict what others write.

Should the skin on the Hass be dark before picking or not necessarily the case?

I found this link on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vx0pDWmy2s
It's very interesting. Although the Avocado in the link defiantly is not a hass. My hass is starting to flower as I mentioned, however my Hass Avocado are not dark in colour yet.

Advice greatly appreciated
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Wheels1974
Melb
13th September 2015 4:39pm
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Markmelb says...
Hi Wheels - Interesting video but it wont effect Avos if you leave them on a bit longer - for example last year i didnt pick my lamb Hass avos till November and then one at a time till end of December - after picking then eat 1 to 2 weeks later. By doing this you can extend how long they last on tree - I still havnt picked a Bacon & Reed yet and year before picked them in May-June - so Im seeing if waiting improves oil content.

My Lamb hass has 5 huge Avos still on it and is flowering in next week or so - but as Im not harvesting to sell they can sit on tree till im ready to pick.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
14th September 2015 7:20pm
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Original Post was last edited: 14th September 2015 7:19pm
sophia12141 says...
Exactly i have no idea of the answers to your quetions, but hope you've solved your problem and wish a good day to you http://iaohin.com/wp-content/view/sitemap.xml
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sophia12141
Enter Postcode First,1553635,
15th September 2015 5:42pm
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Wheels1974 says...
I am pleased to report that my Hass Avocado kept all it's 11 Avocado's in its first year of fruiting.
I harvested one of my Hass Avocado's 3 weeks ago and we put it in a paper bag with a banana and 2 weeks later it was perfectly ripe and tasted delicious.

We just cut a few more off today as we noticed quite a few match head size baby Avo's appearing all over the tree.

Fingers crossed this year it will hold allot more Avo's although I cannot complain as it held all it's 11 fruit for it's first season which im wrapped about.

I'm just wondering if I should just cut the remaining 6 avo's that are on the tree as it has allot of baby avo's on it, your advice will be greatly appreciated.

Here is a photo taken today of my 3 or 4 year old Hass Avocado tree.

Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Wheels1974
Melb
15th November 2015 5:25pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Oh for what it's worth, I started harvesting my Hass Avo's once they started going a little dark (Purplish) in some area's.
Keep in mind the whole Avo didn't go dark on the tree, only went dark in small area's about the size of a 20 cent piece.
I then just harvested the Avo's that appeared darker and left the complete green ones on.
Then like I said above I then put them in a paper bag with a banana and 2 weeks or so later they were DIVINE.

So I personally will use this method to determine when to start harvesting Hass avocado's, I think waiting just until they show a slight change in colour works a absolute treat.

however with all the other verites that don't change colour then I'll have to figure that out when ever they fruit but I only planted my Bacon & 2nd Fuerte in October 2014 so it's still early.

Unfortunately the first Fuerte Avo tree I planted the same time as my Hass 3 or 4 years ago died.
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Wheels1974
Melb
15th November 2015 5:53pm
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Markmelb says...
Hi Wheels -
Your Hass tree is looking great - I think its a year older now than my Lamb Hass I planted December 2012 - Jason used to talk about trunk thickness as to when Avos begin fruiting in earnest (he said 2inch diam)- My LH is 6cm at base and has quite alot that may hold - others in 100lt bags 4.5cm and Bacon in 530mm pot is 5cm and looks to hold lots after none last season - year before had 4. Did you plant Fuerte in a raised mulch type bed too?
Still having trouble with Wurtz in pot not fruiting still but about to plant in a 230lt pot early December.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
16th November 2015 6:49pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Markmelb, my 5 year old (in ground) Lamb Hass had about 150 small avos on, and after one savage storm/wind etc., I'd say it 'might' have 40 small avos left :-(
Trunk size about 120mm diameter.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
17th November 2015 9:22am
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Markmelb says...
Hi Brendan - looks like Avos grow a bit faster up your way but expect my in ground Lamb Hass should reach maybe 10cm at 5 years old - I think trunk size is a good way to compare productivity - wont know for a couple more weeks how many it will eventually hold as yet - last year was 5 so should beat that.
Bacon had Zero last year but could have lots this crop - same thing dont know yet what will hold - just have to keep the water up on these 32C days like today.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
17th November 2015 5:10pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Great to hear from you Mark.
Yeah I planted my Fuerte on a mound in my half acre block next door which is about 20 meters away from my Hass & Bacon so it wont be a problem for the Hass to help pollinate the Fuerte once they become established.

The trunk of my Hass is 15cm or 6 inches in diameter and was planted in 2011 or 2012.
The trunk of my Bacon is 6.5cm or 2.5 inches in diameter and was planted in 2014.
The trunk of my Fuerte is also 6cm or 2 inches in diameter also planted in 2014 but all trees were purchased as grafted tree's just added this info in case newbies are interested.

I like having these 3 varieties as there harvest times are as follows:
Hass harvest period is from August to January
Bacon harvest period is from March to May
Fuerte harvest period is from April to June

Meaning 10 months of the year I should have my own Avo's if all goes well.
I am just without Avo's in February & July according to the harvest times via the internet.
I found it quite amazing really and im sure once the Hass tree matures into a large tree then im certain that it will hold fruit up to February if not that's fine.

I was strongly considering getting a few more Avocado trees to plant in my vacant block next door, especially something like the Reed Avocado but the harvest time is the same as the Hass and I absolutely hate wasting any type of food, so I don't want to over do it because if these tree's end up maturing im going to have literally hundreds of Avo's as they fruit very heavily once Established and mature.

So I will wait a few years and see how these go before purchasing any more Avo Tree's, however I am really looking forward to my Fuerte & Bacon to start fruiting hopefully in 2018 if sooner it will be a massive bonus.

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Wheels1974
Melb
17th November 2015 7:45pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Brendan was this it’s first year of fruiting?
If so you have done exceptionally well mate but I found I kept loosing them until they reached the size of a olive.

My Hass done the exact same thing last year however it was only in the ground for 2 or 3 years when it first fruited.
I had hundreds of match head baby sized avocado’s but only 11 made it to maturity.
I’m hoping this year in it’s second year of producing fruit that I get 30+ ripe Avo’s this time next year as they take 10 to 12 months before its time to harvest them.
However I might end up with less then 11 as I still have a couple of large Avo’s on the tree and some sites say to cut the mature avo’s just as it starts flowering but im glad I waited that extra 2 months as im almost positive that the fruit would not have been ready and definitely would not have tasted as good if I cut them in September.

From my limited experience I found once the baby Avo’s reach the size of a olive then chances are most of them will reach maturity.
Like you I had hundreds in it's first year of fruiting but only 11 made it to the size of a olive and ALL those 11 made it to harvest time.

Keep us updated please.
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Wheels1974
Melb
17th November 2015 8:08pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Wheels, yes, I would say it's the first time it fruited 'properly'.

I have to spray for Anthracnose up here, otherwise my small avos would just turn black and fall off :-(

Strong wind atm doesn't help either.

I'm sure the spray recipe is somewhere above.
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
18th November 2015 12:36pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Brendan,
If your Avo tree gets allot of wind, you can always get a piece of shade cloth or heshen and 2 star posts or wooden stakes and then erect it on the worst side which will be the North/west or Southerly these wind breaks work wonders.

I put up 4 star posts around my Fuerte tree after planting my second tree as my first Fuerte tree died.
Then attach the shade cloth to the star posts using wire and it works a treat, I think this is vital until they become established trees which is up until the tree is 3 to 4 years old, then remove the shade cloth once they have been in the ground for 3 to 4 years.
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Wheels1974
Melb
20th November 2015 7:52pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Brendan,
I forgot to ask what size are the Avo's at the moment?

Secondly if you have 40 odd Avo's that make it to maturity in the first year of the tree fruiting then you are doing exceptionally well mate.

If the Avo's are still tiny no larger then say a corn kernel or a pea in diameter then don't get upset if you only end up with only a hand full of Avo fruit making it to Harvest time this time next year it's totally normal mate.

I was lucky mine held onto 11 that made it to harvest because I went through the exact same scenario as you, having hundreds of tiny match head sized baby avo's and within 2 or 3 weeks lucky if I had 40 tiny match head sized avo's but apparently for a avo tree that was planted only 2 years and having 11 make it to maturity in it's first year of fruiting is way above average so I have been told by many people in the know so don't stress if more fall off mate.

Write back letting us know what size the avo's are currently or better still put a photo up if you can.
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Wheels1974
Melb
20th November 2015 8:13pm
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Wheels1974 says...
I went to pick off the remaining 6 ripened Avo's and when I got there most were off and as I cut the 6 ripe Avo's, with the slightest move even more fell off.

Lucky if there are 20 baby match head size avo's on my tree, by the time the week is over I will be lucky if I cut 1 Avo next year. lol

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Wheels1974
Melb
22nd November 2015 7:41pm
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Markmelb says...
My Bacon will hold more than Zero last year but wont know as 3mm ones still falling -- Lamb Hass in ground has more than the 5 last year about pea size and holding -- there must be a trick to having them hold or maybe not pollinated properly - lets come back in a few weeks and with a final count?
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
23rd November 2015 1:36pm
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Brendan says...
Hi Markmelb & Wheels,
Some pics of my Lamb Hass Pic3, Anthracnose, Pic2, & my over 40y o seed grown tree with heaps of small fruit. Pic 1.
The fruit on the Lamb Hass are about 30mm dia. Very hard to count, but they are still falling off due to anthracnose :-(, I'd say there's over 35 still on.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
25th November 2015 10:55am
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Original Post was last edited: 25th November 2015 11:00am
Wheels1974 says...
I know this is almost a year later mate but you done very well to harvest 6 Avo's in its first year.

As I stated when my Hass first fruited it had hundreds of match head sized Avo's and only 11 made it to Harvest.
This season again hundreds of match head sized baby Avo's but only 2 will make harvest around November and this is its second year of producing fruit.

How is your tree fruiting this season?
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Wheels1974
Melb
7th September 2016 8:08pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Hi all well another season has passed.

My Hass is flowering for its 3rd consecutive year, its only a young tree of 5 years old since we planted it in October of 2011.

In its first season of fruiting, which was around September of (2014) we were lucky enough to have harvested 11 delicious ripe Avo's in November of Last year (2015)
Its quite amazing how you need to wait over a year from the time these Avo trees flower to the day of Harvest and consumption of its delicious fruit.

This year my Hass is in its second year of bearing fruit and its third year of flowering.
However unfortunately it only held onto the TWO Avo's, they will be ready to eat in November.
From my limited experience from growing Avo's, thus far I have noticed with the Hass variety. as that is all I have had regarding bearing fruit so far, I noticed once the Avo's reach the size of a golf ball or small lemon that is when they seem to stop falling from the tree, in between the match head size and olive size baby avo's they can fall any time, all it takes is a windy day and thats all it takes for 95+% of them to fall during that stage and once they become heavier they seem allot more sturdy and less likely to fall but as I said I have only witnessed two seasons of fruiting just with the Hass variety.
Fingers crossed my Bacon holds onto at least a couple of dozen in its first year of flowering, we will know in the next 4 months or so no doubt.

I have attached some photo's of both my Hass and my Bacon Avo tree.
My Hass which appears healthy, however some of its leaves appear brown as you will see.

It's only been two years ago since I pulled out my Fuerte tree which you can see photo's on this post, I had to pull it out as it died.
However I replaced it with a Bacon Tree although I spread them out allot more as you will see.
It's only been two years since we planted My Bacon Avo and this year it has started to flower like CRAZY and it has huge clumps of flowers as the photo's show.
I cannot believe how lucky I have been as both my Hass & Bacon started flowering in their second year since planting.

I'm a little concerned about my Hass as it has those brown leaves although this has happened before and I think it wasn't getting enough water.
If any of you know what it needs please let me know after viewing the photo's.
We gave it a few hand fulls of gypsum yesterday as Avo's in Melbourne seem to love Gypsum and I will give it a combination of fertiliser, Gypsum & Pot Ash which I distribute over 4 months.
I give them 10% in early December and 40% in January and another 40% in February and the last 10% in March.

I'm in North/Western suburbs of Victoria (Keilor) which is't ideal for Avocado's however with a little love and care they can do quite well.

How is everyone's Avo's doing and have they started flowering this season?
If so share your photo's and any suggestions please.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4

Picture: 5

Picture: 6

Picture: 7

Picture: 8
 
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Wheels1974
Melb
7th September 2016 9:16pm
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J says...
Ive got various avo's on my various avo trees and I was wondering when the best time to harvest them is, esepcially in southern victoria/Melbourne.
I cant seem to find any solid info on the ripening seasons for various varieties.

I've got avos on my wurtz, gwen, bacon, hass, reed and ryan but when is the best time to harvest avos on each of these varieties in victoria?

I know Gwen is fine for august/September but I was wondering about those other varieties..
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J
upwey, victoria
8th September 2016 12:02pm
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J says...
Here's a pic of my wurtz tree bearing fruit.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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J
upwey, victoria
9th September 2016 11:17am
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J says...
and heres a pic of the wurtz tree itself and the 2nd pic is a wide shot of some of my avo trees,
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Picture: 1

Picture: 2
 
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J
upwey, victoria
9th September 2016 11:25am
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Wheels1974 says...
J firstly beautiful trees mate, your doing well.

I agree with you TOTALLY. All the news regarding when is the right time to harvest Avo's is very contradictory when researching via the internet.

From first hand experience regarding your Hass Avo's, first wait until the skin starts turning a purple or dark colour in spots, dont wait for the whole avo to turn purple or that dark colour that the Hass are renowned for, once they start showing spots or blotches of darker skin colouration then pic a couple off and put them in a paper bag with a banana and within 1 to 3 weeks they will be DELICIOUS.
If it helps I started harvesting my Hass in mid November.
Avocado's DO NOT ripen on the tree and this is the case with ALL Avo varieties.

Back to the Hass, you can leave them on the tree for several months and only pick what you need.
If you picked one of your Hass Avo's today chances are it will turn rubbery and shrivel meaning it has no oil content yet.
Now if you pick a few in November and notice within 1 to 3 weeks they are perfect then that means that whole tree will taste good literally from November right through to April/May or longer, so pick them as you need them and remember they need time to ripen out at room temperature.
The longer you wait within reason obviously the higher the oil content which means better tasting.
If you have a ton of Avocado's just experiment and pull one off now and see if it ripens within 2 or 3 weeks then you can start picking, if they go rubbery and shrivel then don't cut the next one until Mid November.

Regarding your other varieties I don't know from first hand experience but MarkMelb on this site has harvested his Bacon & Reed in May-June.

Take what you read from the internet and then just experiment by harvesting just one avocado and write the date down on the paper bag.
If it turns rubbery & wrinkly then wait another two months before harvesting your next Avo from that tree.

I'm sorry I don't have first hand experience with other varieties, but I can guarantee you the Hass will be ready to start harvesting in November although I think they will have a little more oil content around January & Feb but don't wait until January/Feb before you harvest your first few, first try in mid November.

Actually do any of your Hass Avo's have a couple of dark coloured patches on its skin?
If the answer is yes then pick just the one Avo that has the most dark discoloration and I bet it will taste delicious in a few weeks time, just remember to put it in a paper bag with a banana and leave it out at room temperature.

Let me know if any of your Hass have some dark coloured pigmentation on their skin now in September, keep me updated.

Look forward to hearing back from you.
Good luck mate.
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Wheels1974
Melb
12th September 2016 11:25pm
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Markmelb says...
Hi Wheels - was wondering what ferts you use as yours look great - the small amounts of gypsum have proved good - dont forget about teaspoon or 2 of zinc ever 2 years. Are you in the market garden soils of keilor or up near town or Taylors lakes? As the Nth winds are horrific in summer after once living in Sunbury.

Only avo ive picked is the only Bacon I ate last week - was very nice as i wanted to see if oil content better and it was. In fact ive read Bacon is the only Avo to self ripen on tree but had to pick after noticing some cracking.

Good test to see if ready to cut is push a wooden toothpick into it -- if it goes in reasonably easy its ready if not wait longer and try again near same hole and cut along dotted line later to eliminate eating that bit.
In fact even if you do cut too early just put cling film on it and leave on bench and will ripen still.

Will pick Reeds in coming months from about October one at a time -- then the Lamb Hass as those run out until end of January - i have about 9 Reed and 10 Lamb Hass.
Also the Bacon will almost defoliate during flowering to use up carbs in leaves that yellow now so dont worry if this occurs - totally normal.

I think I over ferted my Wurtz as have alot of burnt leaf tips so will only be gentle over next year with little or no ferts.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
13th September 2016 8:34am
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Original Post was last edited: 13th September 2016 11:36am
Grubs1 says...
My trees from Daleys were planted March 2012. I have 1 each of Bacon, Fuerte, Hass, Reed. Unfortunately the tags have come off so I'm no longer sure which is which. One (I think Bacon) gave me 3 avocados last year that were not the biggest you've seen but certainly the best tasting! Nothing at all this year but lots of flowers so fingers crossed. Healthy trees however two of them did get badly scorched in summer 2013 and this set them back.

Planted on mounds and I top up with alternating horse manure and well aged tree chipper mulch before every summer.
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Grubs1
Melbourne
13th September 2016 9:33am
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Original Post was last edited: 13th September 2016 9:33am
J says...
Wheels, thanks for the info on the hass, thats really useful as I've got about 3 fruits on my small hass tree and was wondering whether plucking them off the tree when they are green was ideal or not.

Last season I had about 20 bacons on my big bacon tree and i harvested most of them around this time. I thought they tasted good but my wife didnt like them. She said they had accentuated avocadoey flavour she didnt like at all. I didnt really notice this. Now I left about 3 bacons on that same tree for a month and half longer. So late october I harvested those 3 and when they ripened my wife thought they were delicious and notice any avocadoey unpleasant taste. I definitely thought those laste three were more buttery than the ones harvested in sept.
Also Ive got two gwen trees that have been producing for a few years now and september is usuallt when I harvest gwens with good results taste wise.
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J
upwey, victoria
13th September 2016 3:47pm
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Markmelb says...
Grubs you will be able to work out the Bacon as leaves are rounder and if you chew a bit of leaf you will get a hint of aniseed - most Mexican cVs have that distinction. Fuerte is a large tree and has Fruit like Bacon that doesnt go black to ripen - either does Reed that has round fruit so your Hass is then easy as fruit will go black :)
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
13th September 2016 5:21pm
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Grubs1 says...
Thanks Mark - I'll take a closer look and post a few pictures (soon).
I have also been referring to this Handy Avocado guide from QLD

http://era.daf.qld.gov.au/1642/9/08-HGavo.pdf

in particular the fertilising regime when NOT to apply and when a little phosphorus might be needed.

For those in the know, does this document ring any alarm bells in the Melbourne context or is it still relevant?
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Grubs1
Melbourne
14th September 2016 12:03pm
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J says...
some good reading on avocado pollination in Wa https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/spring/growing-avocados-flowering-pollination-and-fruit-set?page=0%2C2
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J
upwey, victoria
14th September 2016 4:13pm
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J says...
another article https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/spring/challenges-growing-hass-avocado-cool-regions
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Wheels1974 says...
J the longer you leave the avocado's on the tree the higher the oil content becomes (Within reason obviously)

So when you cut the majority of your Bacon in September they obviously didn't have enough oil in them, which is what gives the Avocado that buttery flavour & texture, so when you harvested you last 3 bacon avo's in Late October and tasted allot better means the oil content in the avocado increased significantly in order for your wife to taste such a difference, so I would recommend to start harvesting Mid/Late October seeing your wife noticed a distinct taste difference.
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark thanks mate.
I am very close to Taylors Lakes mate.
The fertilisers I use are just a general fertiliser used for citrus trees and at the same time I give them a few cups of gypsum and a cup of potash, mix these three all together and start giving it to them in early December I only start with 10% in December, January 40%, February 40% and lastly in March the last 10%.

I have yet to give them any zink but I will make a note of that.

Regarding the Bacon variety, I have also read the same thing, stating the Bacon avo’s fall from the tree when Ripe, however I’m not sure how reliable that actually is.
If my tree has a ton of them I will give that method a go.
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Wheels1974 says...
Has anyone noticed leaves falling from their Avo tree's, or is it just me?

Over the past 2 weeks, my avocado tree has dropped quite a lot of leaves and also appears a little droopy.
I have a feeling it's due to all this rain we have had.
Hope to hear from you all soon.
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Markmelb says...
Thats quite normal Wheels - the leaves that drop are basically yellow because all the carbs have been sucked out of them to provide energy for flowering as Avos don't store food in roots like apples and pears etc.
My Lamb Hass is basically naked and starting now to regrow all new leaves.
Some of my Reeds have dropped from winds and were ripe - bit watery verses one i bench ripened but ok to eat - will have to start harvesting the rest of them now week by week.

Heres some pics of mine today ---
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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Original Post was last edited: 11th October 2016 4:57pm
Wheels1974 says...
Thanks a lot for that reassurance Mark, much appreciated mate.
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Wheels1974 says...
Hi guys im quite concerned as my Hass & Bacon Avo's have lost practically ALL their leaves now.

They are flowering or producing a ton of tiny fruit though, this is the first year my Bacon has flowered as its only been 2 years since I planted the tree.
The Hass has never produced this many flowers or tiny fruit in the past two seasons, however it never lost its leaves either.

Now both my Hass & Bacon have practically no leaves what o ever, they just have a huge amount of flowers or tiny avos on them and I am concerned.

Is this normal? The reason I am concerned is because this has never happened and also if the tree does end up holding any fruit the Tree has no canopy to shelter the fruit and also the branches.

Advice greatly appreciated.

I have attached a few photo's.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Wheels1974 says...
I just found this video and am so much more relieved.

The guy basically is saying that when the Avo's are in full bloom, many will lose their leaves, yet some might hold them. However he said, if it has dropped ALL its leaves while in full bloom then no need to stress at all.

After watching the video I posted below.
Now im not sure if my Avo is about to start growing new leaves or if its about to start flowering/fruiting.
All I know is that I have never seen it totally without leaves and its never been so heavy with what ever its doing. Not sure if its about to sprout new leaves or flower or a combination of both.
Fingers crossed it another 8 weeks or so its full of leaves again and some fruit.

Here is the video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPnCKQkG2bw
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Markmelb says...
Yep -- dont stress - they will grow new leaves from centre of flower group so thats why you should never cut back any Avo flowers thinking your helping them.
In a few more weeks when it FINALLY warms up down here by the end of November the tree will look all new again.
My lamb Hass has half grown back and got hit by hail last week - some some leaves are torn but new growth will be fine.
I know its hard waiting but I reckon we will have a good harvest due to all the Hoverflies doing a great job.
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Grubs1 says...
It could be worse. Sheep knocked over one of my tree guards and ate every leaf of my small Fuerte ... and ate every growing tip too. I'm left with a stick 60cm high with a couple of bare twigs at the top I had to trim with secateurs just to clean up the rough ends. *fingers crossed*
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Markmelb says...
Here are some pics Wheels of how well the Hoverflies have done their work this year and the cooler temps have also helped.
Im interested to see how many drop or hang on to full size in 10 months time?

Left pic is Lamb Hass - other is Reed in 100lt grow bag
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Original Post was last edited: 6th December 2016 10:43pm
Brendan says...
Hi Markmelb, with the strife I've had with grafted trees, my seed-grown trees seem to improve every year!
This seed-grown type B is about 15 years old, and I guesstamate there's about 300 small avos on, around golf-ball size! They're fairly stringy, but I cut across the grain, then have them on toast :-)
Taste is 9 out of 10!
Try growing some avo seeds into a pot. Even Daleys say their seed-grown trees have a fairly small seed, that's the trick!
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1
  
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Original Post was last edited: 10th December 2016 4:44pm
Markmelb says...
Hi Brendan - they look pretty abundant on your tree up your way - what trunk Diameter now.Like to see how fibrous you mean too?
My Lamb Hass has quite a small seed but Im eating my last avo now which is a Reed and it tastes so much nicer really - about as good or better than Bacon.

My Gem seed is now forming leaves and have planted a seed in a group planting to see what happens.

Ive read on some sites that they say their seedling Avos will fruit in 3 to 5 years - only negative with Gem is very large seed.

I up potted a Gwen i grafted last Feb into a root pruning 10 gal Geopot bag that is growing extremely well on Reed rootstock - need a few acres for all my Avo seedlings and graftings now :)
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Brendan says...
Hi Markmelb, I meant to ask if you are on an acreage? I'm on 5, but cannot use all, some sandy type soil covers more than half, and it's pH is around 4! :-(
Yes, you can get fruit off a 5yo seed-grown tree, just over feed/mulch it.
Also, the garden guru tells me: "e;e;we can't make the seed smaller, BUT we can make the flesh thicker"e;e; :-)
Trunk diameter would be about 200mm (8"e;e;). Trouble is, it grows like a Christmas tree, very tall.
My email addy: bitquickeratbigpond.com
(Just decipher that)
BTW I'm fairly sure, this tree (seed) came from a large Shepard. Merry Christmas :-)
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Original Post was last edited: 15th December 2016 11:30am
Wheels1974 says...
Hi all on the 26th of October I posted my concern regarding my Hass & Bacon avo trees which lost their leaves around the same time and I posted photo's back then also.

Unfortunately my beautiful Hass still has no leaves on it, but it has about 30 small sized avo's on it about the size of a M&M.

My Bacon fully recovered and grew all its leaves back and is also bearing a few small size baby avo's also the size of a M&M.

I'm really concerned about my Hass avo tree as it still hasn't grown its leaves in TWO months since dropping them. Last week I gave them some fertiliser and potash with some gypsum and am hoping that will help my hass grow its leaves back.

It really has me concerned something chronic as I presume the fruit this year will have no chance of making it without any leaf canopy to stop them from getting sun burnt.
However I don't mind if the fruit don't make it if only my Hass ends up ok.

I will try get some photo's on here this week but it makes it quite hard as I have to rely on others as I am a quadriplegic and confined to a wheelchair.

Has this happened to any of you guys and if so what was the outcome?

All advice is appreciated.
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Wheels1974 says...
Brendan firstly thats a beautiful Avo tree mate. Are you in Melbourne or further North?

Having sandy soil is a huge bonus as it drains well, however its PH level of 4 is a problem for practically all plants.

Have you considered to dig up the soil at least 60cm deep or as deep as you can and add a considerate amount of Potassium Carbonate and also Lime (Calcium carbonate) and continue this every 3 months or so for ONE year then you should be fine to grow practically anything.

Or have you tried this mate?
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark cheers mate both your Lamb Hass and Reed look great, definitely more fruit this season thus far anyway.

Does your Reed have a good amount of leaf coverage?

It was hard to tell on the photo.

I'll try get some photo's of my Avo trees ASAP - Predominantly of my Hass as that's my favourite but im quite concerned about it as it hasn't grown its leaves back yet.
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Markmelb says...
Hi Brendan - I wish I had an Acre - I plant really close and if something not performing and its not a soil issue put a different CV in - Wheels - when Avos fruit and use up their leaf store carbs and drop alot so thay can then reflush a new lot - puts them under alot of stress - my plants in ground and huge pots going ok - Reed is a late flowerer and is just putting back new leaves now - see pics - Ive not had great success with Hass versus Lamb Hass going ok. Be patient as Hass should pickup with this warmer weather now.Alot of LH at BAAG now.

Pic1 is Reed in 100lt Grow Bag
Pic2 is Bacon in 230lt pot
Pic3 is Lamb hass in ground on left and Wurtz in 200lt grow bag and have put alot of nail holes on sides to make it into a root prune bag i hope?
Pictures - Click to enlarge

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Original Post was last edited: 14th December 2016 9:03am
Brendan says...
Hi Wheels, yes Mackay in Queensland, is a lot further north of Melbourne :-)

The trouble with my sandy soil in that section (apart from the very low pH), is there's large rocks about 600mm (2') below the surface! Yes, I've tried digging a large hole, adding Dolomite (Cal Mag) and Gypsum (Calcium Sulphate) etc, but the trees don't last long. I now plant them on a mound on good black soil. So far so good :-)

Just days ago, strong wind & rain dropped about 50 avos from that tree :-(
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Brendan says...
Good pics Markmelb. Yes, it certainly looks like you need a bigger block of land. None for sale out of town? I suppose the cost would be prohibitive?

That seed-grown avo of mine that's stringy, it seems to be on one side of the fruit only(?), so it's no problem really :-) I can send you down some seeds next year if you want? It's a type 'B'.
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Original Post was last edited: 15th December 2016 11:31am
Wheels1974 says...
Great photo's Mark and thanks for the extra info Brendan, yeah by building a huge mound is your best chance.
That's what I have done as the soil here in North/West suburbs of Melbourne is quite clayey.

I have attached a few photo's of my Hass to show you all what it looks like.
My Bacon Avo tree also lost all its leaves the same time as my Hass did.
However my Bacon tree now has a lovely thick cover of leaves, just concerned why my Hass hasn't as yet.

I will add photo's of Bacon tree also in another post.
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Original Post was last edited: 15th December 2016 5:41pm
Wheels1974 says...
Here are photo's of my Bacon tree which I thought was planted in 2014 but after reading my earlier posts on here we must have planted the Bacon in October last year (2015), it has a few baby avo's which I am wrapped about.


Pic 1 - This photo of my Bacon tree was taken in October, as you can see it has very little foliage while it was heavy in flowering, which I understand is quite common.


Pic 2 – Shows the Bacon and its lovely new foliage, yet two months ago it had very little foliage.
Behind the Bacon tree you can see my Hass tree which still has very little foliage.

Pic 3 – Shows just the Bacon tree on its own.

Pic 4 – Is just a close up of the Bacon, showing a few fruit but its quite hard to spot them.

Lastly and most importantly, do you think my Hass will be fine?
Pictures - Click to enlarge

Picture: 1

Picture: 2

Picture: 3

Picture: 4
  
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Original Post was last edited: 15th December 2016 6:04pm
Markmelb says...
Yes Wheels i think your Hass will start growing leaves soon - give it a month and maybe spray some weak eco seaweed on it -- Half teaspoon in 9lt
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Wheels1974 says...
Thanks Mark I will get some of that eco seaweed today or tomorrow.

Also as you can see in the photos I have a wooden frame up around my Avocado trees and on top of that I have shade cloth that I can roll out when ever the days get really hot.
I'm just wondering do you think it will be a good idea to roll the shade cloth over just the Hass Tree seeing it has no foliage canopy?
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Markmelb says...
Wheels you could as a nursing back to health thing but maybe due to our wet winter it has succumbed to root rot like mine have - check out this link and videos on site - these are professional growers discussing phytophera and is very interesting stuff.

Im getting some Metaxyl as Antirot or Phytoguard not defeating the problem either.

I read that this new Dusera phyto tolerant rootstock actually only grows roots faster than the Phyto can kill them - they do mention that Gypsum and Mulch can help too over a longer term to slow it down as in my case also - If you as they said can see thru your Avo you have a root rot problem.
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Brendan says...
Have youse seen this video from Daleys?
Some very good info!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_Vx86SCX4w
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23rd December 2016 9:41am
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Markmelb says...
Most of whats on Video good if you are able to read between lines - did you note there was no reason for using Gypsum - in fact it helps against Phytophera and also helps with clay and is a sort of fertilizer for avos. In Vicco they go backwards in winter due to our wet here and dont show damage till spring from wet feet - where you are up north is quite dry in winter - so roots get damaged and Phytophera can occur very easily even with perfect drainage - Avo farms up North use all the treatments but at present still using Phos Acid and have used Phytoguard for a year with fair results and some very good recoveries with a Daleys Pinkerton - now have treated all in various degrees with Metalaxyl Fungicide - and have already seen some pickup with less wilt with todays 35C - will keep you posted :)
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Original Post was last edited: 25th December 2016 9:30am
Brendan says...
Hi Markmelb, I followed that video, but as you said, reading between the lines, I did this. I made the mound with about 12 bags of bought compost & some gypsum, but I let the mound just sit there for 9 weeks! That IMO, is a good idea.
I bought a Reed from Masters at a very good price ($32), and placed it near the mound for the same amount of time, to get it 'acclimatized.' It's only been growing (in the mound), for 5˝ weeks, and has new shoots already! Most avos I've grown usually take about 6 months to sprout new shoots! It's raining here at the moment, so will take a pic later.
One more thing, this is the first time I've used Lucerne for mulch, but my friendly wallabies have taken a liking to eating it! :-(
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Markmelb says...
Brendan - put a Fence around that Reed or those Wallabies could devour it? or other critters?
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Brendan says...
Good idea Mark.
Some pics of the Reed yesterday between showers. Looking at my pics, I need to expand it a good bit, and add more lucerne and a fence!

Also, pic of ripe seed-grown type 'B' avo from last year. Taste 9 out of 10.
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Picture: 2

Picture: 3
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark cheers mate thanks for that info and I think you might be right.

I went down to Bunnings but they never heard of Metalaxyl so I purchased some Yates ANTI ROT which controls Root Rot, Collar Rot and Downy mildew.
It says on the bottle For Citrus, Avocados, Grapes & Ornamentals.

Also at the back of the bottle where it gives instructions.
Under Avocado's it states "e;Disease Phytophthora and states Apply as a foliar spray to run-off. Use 7.5 to 10 litres per adult tree. Apply every 3 weeks as a curative spray, or every 5-6 weeks as a preventative spray"e;

Mark would my Hass tree be classed as mature?
It has been in the ground for 4 years and is about 6 feet high.
Lastly when it states "e;Apply as a foliar"e; this means I need to spray it on the actual tree every 3 weeks as a curative. What do you thin mate?

Where did you get your Metalaxyl from?

Thanks for everyone's advice and help over the years.
Wishing you all a safe and above all a healthy New Year.
Will no doubt be back on here in the New Year, either with Good news or shocking news if my Hass does have Root Rot and dies, I'll be devastated but its not looking promising.

Cheers ALL!!!
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Markmelb says...
Hi Brenden - terrific mound - a tip - mix compost with mulch and roots will run thru faster - dont forget the gypsum - not a very round reed as is a cross with a hass i guess being a seedling.
is your Mound reed grafted?

Pic1 Gem Avo seedling looks to have nice leaves.

Pic2 Unusual baby Avo taking after its name - LOL
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Original Post was last edited: 29th December 2016 5:46pm
Markmelb says...
Wheels - try the Antirot for now - spray mornings or 7pm for better take up. Never when its hot.
The Avo Fungicide i got is from Elders but will let you know if it works first - for your tree not mature - 3ml per litre and spray about 5lt to run off - the run off goes into soil too at drip line where feeder roots are to act on roots as well as systemically.
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Brendan says...
Yes Markmelb, my Reed is grafted.

Are those avos in your latest pics, both seed-grown? Where did you get the Gem from? If it's from a grafted Gem, it won't be true, but could still be a great avo!

Don't like mixing mulch into the compost/mound, as it robs nitrogen and magnesium from the soil. I suppose I could have dug some lucerne in, as it contains some nitrogen. The worms will start pulling it down soon, I hope :)
The wallabies have left the lucerne alone lately, as the grass (they're eating), is growing like mad with all this rain.

We're in for a LOT more rain for the next week or more, so I won't touch the Reed until that's over. It should be ok, as it's growing on sloping ground.

Masters had 6 Reeds for sale when I bought mine, should've bought the LOT! They are no longer trading ;-(
Hindsight is a wonderful thing.
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Markmelb says...
Hi Brendan - the Gem is a seed experiment from fruit i got here from their first release trial maybe in Melb a few months ago I wrote in this thread above - but may be in a Gem thread? I think would still get a pretty good seedling as they would have large plantings of Gem and would be close -and is worth a go if they arnt releasing Gem Plants for home growers. The Ben Hur people and others arnt scared to release PBR plants.What peeves me is that you can buy a Gem in California for the home grower - ##### Hummf ##### in fact a few people have Gwen and Lamb Hass was a PBR and is widely available - I have too many fruit to count on it this year so may be about 50 or more and not dropping.
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Brendan says...
Good looking tree Mark. Is that white-wash or white water based paint on the branches?

We've had terrible seasons the last two years, and my Lamb Hass decided not to flower (or fruit) at all last year? Was planted in 2009! We've had 227mm rain since Monday (& it's still raining), and Lamb Hass has new shoots all over, which is good I suppose? I reckon it's just worked out it's growing in Mackay and not down south :)

The heavy rain, storms and wind, is still causing my seed-grown fruit to drop! Reckon I'd have 200 left out of 400, and my Shepard has about 20 on. :)
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark,
Firstly thanks for the great support and info.
Great news thankfully, my Hass Avo has now got a lot more leaves on it and is slowly looking better.

I have not used the Yates ANTI ROT as yet so not sure why it took so long before the leaves started growing back.

The only thing I can think of is maybe because it flowered so heavily this year and now that most of the fruit are falling its gaining its strength back slowly.

Attached is a photo of my Hass.

Lastly what is the best or a good root stock to use when grafting a Avo tree?
A mate of mine grafts many stone fruit such as Peaches, Nectarine, Apricots and the likes but he does all his grafts when the trees have lost their leaves and he asked me if Avo's drop their leaves and I said no not like stone fruit do each year so he wasn't sure as to what root stock to use and what time of year is best to do it.
Any advice would be appreciated.
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
5th January 2017 10:12pm
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Markmelb says...
Hi Wheels - I use Reed mainly for a rootstock - I believe its the alternative to Zutana and works well.

The grafting window down here is ok now till end of feb - timing the bud on scion is the key - checkout youtube for info too. Glad Hass has come back - Avos are not instant unless they are dying - results show in 2 or 3 months if you change something for good or even bad and then it may take a year to recover.
Yes Brendan - just dilute ceiling paint on branches getting sun to stop canker. You may need to start antirot with all that rain and waterlogged ground?
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
7th January 2017 10:16am
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Brendan says...
I would still spray the tree with the anti-rot Wheels as a preventative measure. (just follow the directions on the pack). Don't forget, the anti-rot is taken up quicker by spraying the leaves :)
Make sure you spray the whole tree, trunk and especially, where the trunk meets the soil.
Might also pay to move your mulch further away from the trunk itself.
Good luck!
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Brendan
Mackay, Q
8th January 2017 11:43am
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BJ11 says...
I've got a couple of avo seedlings that grew themselves out of the compost and survived the winter (with a nice fall of snow). I didn't think it was possible to grow avo in Trentham, but given their pluck I've potted them (where they are turning into little triffids) and have made a nice raised bed full of compost, mulch and poo that is on a slope where they will meet their 'forever home' in Spring 2017.
My problem is that I've no idea what type (A or B) these three troopers are and I would love some fruit. Is there a way I can tell, or should I just try and graft a branch of Hass and Bacon (due to snow in winter I think these are my best hope) when these guys are big enough.
(Seriously - they were poking out of the compost through the snow! These are some tough avo!)
Thanks in advance
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BJ11
TRENTHAM EAST,3458,VIC
12th January 2017 8:58pm
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Markmelb says...
Hi BJ - the compost was warm breaking down - thats why they survived.
Also if they more than likely were Hass from where you bought they will Hass seedlings but not true to type - Can take 7 to 15 years to get fruit if they survive - snow isnt an issue - its frost.
So if they have trees around for wind and sun protection have a go - if they survive grafted plants are available and have had those fruit in 2 years. But only left 1 or 2 on. The five year old lamb Hass now has 60 this year.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
13th January 2017 10:35am
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Original Post was last edited: 13th January 2017 10:35am
Wheels1974 says...
My Hass is looking a lot better by the week, however its dropped almost all of its fruit. I only have 4 avos on it now. I noticed this year there were tons more flowers and baby fruit compared to the previous 2 years of fruiting.

However I must be doing something wrong as they are not holding onto the fruit.

In the past I always fertilised my Avo trees in December, January, February & March usually giving them 10% in December, 40% January, 40% February and 10% in March but I think I should change my fertilising regime.

I fertilised my Avo's in early December, but I think I won't give them anymore now for a while.

Mark after I gave mine a half teaspoon of that eco seaweed with 9 litres of water it seemed to really pick up but I thought you meant poor the 9 litres of water it in the soil.
I just re-read some comments and just realised you stated to mix the half teaspoon of eco seaweed in 9 litres of water and spray it on it.
Is that what you do with the eco seaweed, spray it on the tree?

What ferts do you guys give your avo trees and what time of the year do you fertilise them?
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
18th January 2017 8:56pm
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Original Post was last edited: 18th January 2017 8:57pm
Markmelb says...
Wheels - Avos have been growing roots past month and you will notice a few leaves yellowing again? mine are and that means a bigger and better flush is about to happen again soon - My Reed has dropped nearly all as well as bacon too - the Lamb Hass in ground only a couple and maybe just under 60 left and is about to flush.
You can use Eco seaweed or powerfeed liquid etc at 1tsp or 40ml to 9lt every month no probs - as well as foliar weaker solution in between - I suggest just using slow release like troforte Citrus or green jacket etc as well just before summer and liquid feeds - if in ground could use that new powerfeed granular BEYOND DRIPLINE or pivot 400 - its pretty hot the last one but will work ok BDL
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
19th January 2017 11:35am
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Grubs1 says...
Here is a handy Avo calendar that I use as a reference: http://era.daf.qld.gov.au/1642/9/08-HGavo.pdf

(bearing in mind QLD and VIC may be a bit different so I look at the timing against the leaf growth).
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Grubs1
Melbourne
19th January 2017 2:33pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark thanks again for your feedback mate.

With the Eco seaweed is it fine to use 40ml with 9lt and just poor it in the ground or do you mean spray the tree with it?

Lastly when you say “foliar weaker solution in between” does this mean like 20ml of Eco seaweed with 9lt of water then spray it on the tree?
Sorry about all the questions but im still learning a lot Re: Avo trees.

Thanks for all your advice in advance mate.
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
25th January 2017 4:39pm
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Original Post was last edited: 25th January 2017 4:41pm
Markmelb says...
Wheels mate youve got your measurements twisted - confused with powerfeed liquid.
Eco-seaweed is a powder -- the spoon they give you is wrong -- it measures 2tsp -- (get a 1TSP measure) or use a half measure in a water can -- 1TSP -- also same as foliar or half weaker if you want - spray early morning or after 6pm etc - if you water in every 3 to 4 weeks ok too -- read the container -- is pretty safe stuff but as avos go you wont see anything for a few months - they are not instant as you are discovering - if you are getting leaf tip burn back off the nutrients for a while. If you have a Birwood Avo tag they have it all there and is good - The Mulching I worked out is not straight grass clippings but mixed with mulch - you could do same lucern or sugar cane mulch i guess as I do as i have a mulching mower and no grass clippings.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
27th January 2017 8:57am
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Original Post was last edited: 27th January 2017 9:17am
lockey2 says...
Hello all, I posted back in 2012 with pics of my bacon avacado tree. Here is an update in 2017 with pics of tree and fruit. Plant protected (frost,wind,hot sun)with shade cloth on top and sides when smaller for 4 years, fertilized with horse manure and slow release fertiliser. Plant on small slope in soil that drains well and water, water, water they love it. Prevents leaf burn and stress. Mulch under tree with leaves off other tree and avo leaves , the roots will thrive.
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lockey2
croydon
27th February 2017 8:07pm
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Original Post was last edited: 27th February 2017 9:02pm
Wheels1974 says...
Cheers Mark in my previous post I stuffed up as I have the Eco Seaweed which looks like a tub of black powder.
On the Eco Seaweed tub it says 2 teaspoons to 9 litres.

I will fill only half the spoon they provide with the Eco seaweed powder with 9 litres of water and pour the water under the canopy each month.

I also have endless amounts of Sheep and chicken manure.
The sheep manure is years old as I own a 180 acre hobby farm only 45 minutes from where I live and under the shearing shed I have ton's of old sheep manure.
I also have 6 chickens in my backyard for daily fresh eggs but im scared to use chicken manure coz it can be very strong I've read.

I gave my Hass Avo tree half a 9Lt bucket of dry sheep manure early Feb but my old man said it's not enough, however I said just a half bucket will do for now until I know for sure what is the correct amount.
How much sheep manure is a good amount and how often would you recommend giving it too your Avo trees? - keep in mind this is old dry sheep manure so its years old.

The Avo trees are looking great now and we are not watering it as much now only once or twice per week.
I was concerned the wet spring may have been the reason they lost all their leaves late Spring early Summer.
We put a couple of fingers in the dirt about 50mm deep and if its moist we don't water.
The only bummer is I have only 4 fruit on my Hass, but my Bacon lost all its fruit and both my Hass & Bacon trees had hundreds of baby fruit to start with, however my Bacon tree was planted in October 2015 so hopefully this year it'll hold some fruit.

Thanks again mate.
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
7th March 2017 8:05pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Lockey your Bacon Avo looks magnificent and its a lovely size for only a 4-5 year old tree.

I planted my Bacon in October 2015 and last Spring it had hundreds of baby fruit but they all fell off unfortunately.

My Avo trees aren't as big as your Bacon tree. Look at the photo's posted above to get a better idea.

I have ton's of dry old sheep manure, how much manure would you recommend giving your Avo trees and also how often?

Cheers
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
7th March 2017 8:18pm
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Original Post was last edited: 7th March 2017 8:19pm
Markmelb says...
Wheels - I wouldn't overdo the sheep manure as there are salts within thay dont like.

An italian friend killed his Avos by doing what he normally does around his fruit tree using it like mulch. He planted a Bacon I grafted for him and he followed my directions using lots of normal mulch etc and is going well in a different spot.

Im heading in the direction of liquid feeding to dripline and powerfeed granular beyond that.

Ive done my second application of medlar 50g and Avos are pushing nice new leaves in this current flush - it was definitly affected by Phytophera. Still has 30+ avos on it - alot have fallen.

This winter im laying plastic under tree to stop rain around roots as they are used to being dry during cool cycle - wont be easy to do but will try.

Lockeys Bacon is looking good - must have great drainage - well done.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
8th March 2017 9:13am
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Original Post was last edited: 9th March 2017 6:51pm
lockey2 says...
Hello wheels i use horse manure as its cheap, 2 dollars a bag near me and from what I've researched the best manure for avacadoes. Cow manure, chook manure, sheep manure can be too strong and need to composted and rested. This is from what ive read. I apply a few shovels , summer, winter and spring. Water through alot aswell. Cheers. Your tree might be dropping avacados due to lack of water. They love water especially in well drained soil. Theres a channel called grow quest on you tube and hes got great advice on avacadoe trees i learned alot from watching his videos, a no nonsense nuseryman. Cheers.
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lockey2
croydon
10th March 2017 11:06am
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Original Post was last edited: 10th March 2017 5:54pm
Linton says...
Pomsi - Take 2!

Since all of the Pomsis (Persea fructifera) I tried to grow last time suffered from sudden death syndrome and all died, I am having a second attempt at growing these Himalayan avocados. So far so good, as you can see from the pictures they are growing well but please tell me if I should do something to prevent them from dying again suddenly.

Looking at my previous posts for pomsis on this thread, I see that I tried to grow them in June/July last time, so the timing might be a bit better now with the warmer temperatures still around, even so, Pomsis should exhibit considerable cold hardiness as well.

Have also used some of Mark's special type of fungicide on the pomsi seedlings as he told me to use it for my other avocados. Cheers!
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
12th March 2017 2:39pm
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jakfruit etiquette says...
What pot mix are you using ?
It looks a bit too fine and dense.
Also Avocados are usually propagated in tall narrow pots/bags, ie as wide as your pots but 2 to 3 times taller.
This increases the drainage and aeration around the young seedling, while allowing frequent watering.
I'm sure other Persea spp would benefit.

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jakfruit etiquette
vic
13th March 2017 12:51pm
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Wheels1974 says...
Mark,
Cheers mate, I won't give it sheep manure again.
I will just stick with giving it a half teaspoon of that Eco Seaweed powder every month.

Would you recommend giving it any other fertiliser during the Spring and early summer while it flushes or will a half teaspoon of Eco Seaweed with 9Lt of water every month be suffice.
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Wheels1974
Melbourne
16th March 2017 11:28pm
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Markmelb says...
I am mixing it up with some liquid powerfeed too (inside dripline) and sometimes a sprinkle of chook pellets around dripline on top of freshly laid mulch so roots dont have a chance of burning. Take a look under mulch gently around dripline to see that surface roots a getting out that far. They can go several metres beyond if mulch is out that far. Troforte Citrus is good and safe to put under mulch.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
19th March 2017 12:02pm
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Linton says...
The pomsi seeds were started in coarse propagating mix and now growing with Debco potting mixed in.

Where can I get those tall pots you mentioned? I've been looking for deep narrow pots for ages but they don't have them in Bunnings or the nurseries around here. Thanks.
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Linton
NOBLE PARK,3174,VIC
19th March 2017 4:16pm
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tbcha1 says...
Hi all!
anyone know how i can tell if the avocado tree i bought is a type A or B?? i bought it from a garage sale and she said its a dwarf type and thinks its a wurtz.
Dont have room for more then 2 trees...even 2 trees is pushing it!
thanks
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tbcha1
Bayswater, VIC
28th March 2017 7:56pm
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Markmelb says...
A pic would have been handy? It doesnt matter in Melb - does it have a graft? Are leaves pointed or rounded - start reading all these threads and make sure you plant it in a 30cm+ well raised bed of mulch & compost and give wind protection for first couple years.
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Markmelb
MOUNT WAVERLEY,3149,VIC
29th March 2017 7:57am
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tbcha1 says...
hi MarkMelb
thanks for getting back
the leaves are pointed and it is a grafted tree. She bought it from another popular online site. This is a pic of the tree and the leaves close up. In a very small pot at the moment but plan to make a wickering pot out of a 220 water drum cut in half. Do you think that would be ok? i dont know how long ill be at this place so want to be able to take it with me.
thanks
regards
TC
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tbcha1
Bayswater, VIC
2nd April 2017 1:06pm
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Markmelb says...
Yes - looks like a Wurtz in good nick.

Im having success growing in root pruning Geopots (from Gardenworld Hydroponics or others maybe?)
If you search forum for Geopot you will find my pics as these are working well.

Start with a 10gallon - In Premium potting mix add 20% pearlite / Vermiculite - 3% peatmoss - handfull of rockdust and top last 5cm with course pine bark - then a hanful of gypsum over the top as helps agaimst root rot as does pine bark too. I have one in grafted only 2 years old in a 35gal with 10 Avos on it - so can be done but Wurtz are the slowest ive found to bear - have 2 after 5 years in a 200lt bag -- I suggest Lamb Hass or Pinkerton in Geopots as are semi and dwarf respectively - Lamb Hass is a good bearer - but give lots wind protection for success too.
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Markmelb
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2nd April 2017 6:06pm
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tbcha1 says...
thanks for the tips Mark.
Checked out those Geopots they look great and pretty cheap too.

You said it doesnt matter if i dont get the A and B type plants in Melbourne. But will i get more fruit if i had both types?

thanks
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tbcha1
Bayswater, VIC
18th April 2017 11:38pm
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